LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  May 2014

ARSCLIST May 2014

Subject:

Re: Talking Books pre-1952

From:

Matthew Rubery <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 30 May 2014 13:14:08 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (81 lines)

Thanks for the helpful suggestions. My history of talking books is nearly
finished, and I wanted to make sure I hadn't overlooked any major examples.

While writing this book, I've worked extensively with archives held by
blindness organizations in both the US and UK. Anyone interested is welcome
to view my article "From Shell Shock to Shellac: The Great War, Blindness,
and Britain's Talking Book Library":
http://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/05/06/tcbh.hwu017.full?keytype=ref&ijkey=CgHeMMGJYDEqkal

Please feel free to contact me with any further tips.

Best wishes,
Matt


On Thu, May 29, 2014 at 7:47 PM, Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I hate to say it,but I have seen a lot of Talking Book records over the
> years at thrift stores that looked like standard 78 records.All
> shellac.Don't know what speed they were.Usually these were in plain brown
> sleeves,with blank labels in braille,with no accompanying information.I
> passed on them,and I am sure most people would.Had I known a few of these
> might contain material like Orson Welles broadcasts,I would have bought
> them.
>
> Roger
>
> > Date: Thu, 29 May 2014 13:45:41 -0400
> > From: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Talking Books pre-1952
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> >
> > Dear Dr. Rubery,
> >
> > Have you consulted THAT ALL MAY READ, a history of the American
> Foundation
> > for the Blind's Talking Book program, which began c1934? It has some
> > inaccuracies but may provide some useful information. The program
> continues
> > under the aegis of the Library of Congress, which I also suggest as a
> > useful source.
> >
> > With best wishes,
> >
> > D. Rooney
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu, May 29, 2014 at 8:04 AM, Matthew Rubery <
> [log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Hello, I’m looking for information about talking book records made
> before
> > > 1952. I’ve done some work with books recorded for blind people, radio
> > > broadcasts of Orson Welles, and Dickens recitations. Any other
> suggestions
> > > would be welcome.
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > >
> > > Matt
> > >
> > > Dr Matthew Rubery
> > > School of English and Drama
> > > Queen Mary University of London
> > >
> > > Web: http://www.sed.qmul.ac.uk/staff/ruberym.html
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > 1006 Langer Way
> > Delray Beach, FL 33483
> > 212.874.9626
>
>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Error during command authentication.

Error - unable to initiate communication with LISTSERV (errno=111). The server is probably not started.

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager