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METS  June 2002

METS June 2002

Subject:

Re: Text Tech Metadata

From:

Bartek Plichta <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 5 Jun 2002 12:36:32 -0400

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text/plain

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text/plain (93 lines)

Hello,

This is in response to the question about the languages listed in the Text
Tech Schema. While ISO 639-2 seems to be a good choice for a set of standard
language codes, I would like to alert the METS community to the possibility
of using the Ethnologue set of language codes (http://www.ethnologue.com),
not as a replacement, but rather as an alternative (via mapping) to ISO
693-2. The Ethnologue has more than 7000 unique language identifiers (ISO
has only 381). It is also based on good linguistic-typological research
whereby the languages and their descriptions are intended to correspond more
closely to the linguistic reality of a particular region. In addition, the
Ethnologue does a very good job of providing language family (again, with
good linguistics behind it) and country code information. The Ethnologue
language database is freely available for display by individual metadata
applications. The mapping between the Enthnologue and ISO 639-2 is fairly
straightforward (320 one-to-one equivalents), with the following exceptions:
27 have no Ethnologue equivalent and 42 ISO codes are mapped to multiple
Ethnologue equivalents). The Ethnologue has been accepted by the linguistic
community much in the same way as Unicode.

I also think it might be worthwhile adding another language element to the
schema. This would provide a way to capture the distinction between the
language of the resource (e.g., 'language') and the language that the
resource describes (e.g., 'subject.language'), unless, of course, the schema
can already handle that. An example of that could a Fulfulde-French
dictionary, where the alternative name "Pulaar" is preferred (using
Ethnologue codes):

<language code="FRN"/>
<subject.language code="FUL">Pulaar</subject.language>

or a Fulfulde dictionary, which is in, and about Fulfulde:

<language code="FUL"/>
<subject.language code="FUL"/>

Your comments are greatly appreciated.

Bartek Plichta

Matrix
Michigan State University
310 Auditorium Building
East Lansing, MI
48824-1120

Phone: 517.355.9300
Fax: 517.355.8363



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of Jerome McDonough
> Sent: Wednesday, June 05, 2002 10:35 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [METS] Text Tech Metadata
>
>
> Howdy,
>
> A long time ago at a METS meeting far, far away, I volunteered to
> try to come
> up with an extension schema for technical metadata for text that would
> incorporate
> some of the ideas from both the original MOA2 project and LC's
> text technical
> metadata.  I've finished a first pass at this, and would like some
> comments/feedback.
> You can find the schema at:
>
>          http://dlib.nyu.edu/METS/textmd.xsd
>
> and documentation for the schema at:
>
>          http://dlib.nyu.edu/METS/textmd.htm
>
> In particular, I'd be interested in knowing if people are trying
> to capture
> technical
> metadata regarding text that does not fit in the elements
> provided, and whether
> the choices made for enumeration of languages and character sets seem like
> good ones.
>
> Jerome McDonough
> Digital Library Development Team Leader
> Elmer Bobst Library, New York University
> 70 Washington Square South, 8th Floor
> New York, NY 10012
> [log in to unmask]
> (212) 998-2425

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