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METS  July 2002

METS July 2002

Subject:

Re: <par> element? / orientation

From:

Jerome McDonough <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 1 Jul 2002 17:25:05 +0100

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text/plain (91 lines)

At 12:46 PM 6/28/2002 +0100, Lyn Lewis Dafis wrote:
>Hello
>
>At the National Library of Wales we're just about to start using METS
>and we've come across somethings we just can't figure out so perhaps the
>list can help us.
>
>1. We're creating a digital object from a book page by page, but in some
>instances both pages are needed to make sense of a table which is spread
>across both. Would you use the <par> element to indicate this, and then
>how would the tagging work with the <div>?

Yes, I would definitely use a <par> element to indicate the use of two
page image files to represent a single logical object (the table).  As
for the <div> structure, the issue is not so much the table ( <div
TYPE='table'>
is straightforward enough), but what comes above it in the structural
hierarchy.  There are at least two different approaches you might take.

The first is what I'd call the 'pure logical structure' approach.  In this
case, you probably wouldn't have <div> elements representing any
individual pages.  Instead, you have something like the following:

<div TYPE="book">
         <div TYPE="chapter">
                 <fptr><seq>points to all page images for chapter</seq></fptr>
                 <div TYPE="table">
                         <fptr><par>points to 2 page images for
table</par></fptr>
                 </div>
         </div>
</div>

In this case, there is some overlap in the files included in the <fptr>s
for the
chapter level and for the table level; the structural map only identifies
logical structures within the text, and you don't worry about trying to
have subsidiary <div>s representing each subcomponent of a chapter; you
only have a single one to identify the table as a significant object of
interest,
and rely on the fact that the chapter <div> identifies all of the page image
files for the chapter to allow the user to navigate the chapter.  As an
alternative, you could go with a more mixed 'physical/logical structure'
approach, say,

<div TYPE="book">
         <div TYPE="chapter">
                 <div TYPE="subchapter text">
                         <fptr><seq>points to page images before
table</seq></fptr>
                 </div>
                 <div TYPE="table">
                         <fptr><par>points to 2 page images for
table</par></fptr>
                 </div>
                 <div TYPE="subchapter text">
                         <fptr><seq>points to page images after
table</seq></fptr>
                 </div>
         </div>
</div>

>2. With the same book, the pages are viewed as "portrait" but sometimes
>the tables should be viewd as landscape in order to read them, how would
>you indicate this in METS?

The operating philosophy of METS is that structure and display are separate
(if related) tasks, and so information on how a particular page image should
be viewed isn't strictly speaking structural metadata (and hence not part of
the defined elements in the METS schema).  There are two possible solutions
to the problem of how to include this type of rendering information in with
METS.
The most straightforward has already been provided by Laurent; use MIX to
record this technical metadata for the appropriate page image files.  The other
is that taken by the METAe metadata engine project in the EU, which developed
a separate document format (ALTO: Analyzed Layout & Text Object) to store
layout information.  To some degree, it's just a matter of what schema do you
want to use to record layout information, and do you want to store it
internally
in the METS document, or have a reference in the METS document to external
metadata.


Jerome McDonough
Digital Library Development Team Leader
Elmer Bobst Library, New York University
70 Washington Square South, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10012
[log in to unmask]
(212) 998-2425

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