LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for SF-LIT Archives


SF-LIT Archives

SF-LIT Archives


SF-LIT@C4VLPLISTSERV01.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SF-LIT Home

SF-LIT Home

SF-LIT  February 2003

SF-LIT February 2003

Subject:

Search for specific Alternative History Novel... (long)

From:

David Wright <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Science Fiction and Fantasy Listserv <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 8 Feb 2003 11:52:37 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (135 lines)

     My thanks to the patient members of this
list, and your kind assistance in my quest for
this patron's remembered book.  Nothing I've come
up with so far, nor anything the patron has seen
on Uchronia.com, is it.  I just got a lengthy
description of the book from the patron, and I'm
going to paste it below, just to have covered all
my bases.  What follows is very long (funny how
people remember every d--m thing about a book but
not its title or author), so please cut it out of
any answering posts.  Thanks for your indulgence,
I'm also going to post this on some alternative
history message boards...
David Wright
Seattle Public Library
"...not that's not it - I looked through the
entire list (below) and the only three titles
that sounded even vaguely famliar were Ben Bova's
Triumph, Arthur Rhodes' The Last Reich, and
Daniel Quinn's After Dachau.  This wasn't a short
story, but definitely a novel.  It wasn't by
Harry Turtledove, Brad Lineweaver, Dean Koontz,
or Philip K. Dick.  Both the novel and the title
were written in American English.  The setting
for the entire novel was in the United States,
which had become a semi-independent satrapy of
the Reich.  The central character is a cop, a
Joe-Friday-sans-conscience-sans-morality, who,
along with his partner, a younger man, has been
assigned to investigate a particularly strange
murder.  As I remember, the dates involved were
in the mid-1960s.  America's culture had become
completely Nazified.  The novel opens with a
scene in which the cop is asking a woman if he
can question her two sons concerning the incident
he's investigating -- apparently they witnessed
something pertinent to it.  She says yes, and
tells them to go into the back yard, where the
boys are playing.  When he goes out back, he
finds the two boys, who have nailed the paws of
their pet hamster (guinea-pig?) to a board.  As
he walks up to them, they are hammering a final
nail into the hamster's belly.  When the boys try
demanding money from their mother to buy another
hamster or other small creature so they can
torture it to death, she exhibits only annoyance
of the "honestly, do you think I'm made of
money?" variety, and tells them no.  The cop asks
if he can take the boys downtown to the
station-house to question them;  it's fine with
her.  So off they go in the cop-car, the cop's
partner driving.  The boys try demanding money
from the cop, who simply turns around in his seat
and belts them one.  After that, though sullen
and unhappy, they cooperate, telling him what
little they can of the matter.
     Later on, the cop and his partner pay a
visit to a young gay man whose lover has been
murdered, trying to get information on the matter
from him.  He is so distraught, however, that
they don't get anything useful.  At that point,
the author goes into great detail concerning the
bedroom in which the gay man is talking to the
cops;  Nazi banners and Hitler Youth posters are
everywhere, clearly fetish items.  It's an almost
sympathetic portrait -- except that the Nazi
regalia is extremely off-putting.
     That evening (or maybe the day after) the
cop and his partner go to a night-club, trying to
track down a witness.  The entertainment being
presented in the club at the time consists of a
man literally crucifying a blond, naked Slavic
woman, nailing her to a wooden cross right there
on stage.  Her tongue has been torn out, and she
can only make lugubrious gurgling noises.
     And so it goes.  At another point in the
novel, the cop goes to a local whorehouse run by
a woman whose name is, I think, Lottie or
something of the sort.  The "prostitutes" there
are all young girls, many of them six or seven,
kept there against their will, forced to service
the clients, generally men, who pay (the madame,
of course) to have sex with the little girls.
Some of the clients are murderous sadists;  the
madame doesn't give a damn, it's all the same to
her as long as she maximizes the profit out of
the girls before they're too old to appeal to the
perverts, or die as a result of the way they're
treated.  It's all perfectly legal.  The cop
doesn't seem to be particularly outraged over the
setup, but it is said at one point that the
madame reminded him of a snake -- clearly he was
repelled by her.  At any rate, he wants to talk
to a little girl there who had been visited by a
man who only wanted to talk to her.  Eventually
the cop and that man cross paths, and that's when
the cop learns that the man is from a parallel
world, our world, a world in which the Nazis were
defeated.
     Other things I remember are something about
a film of or story about a senile, deteriorated
Hitler screaming that he was betrayed, presumably
by his flunkies, who took over when Hitler
started going downhill;  that at the end of the
novel, the world was on the verge of all-out
nuclear war between the Reich and the Empire of
Japan, because the latter was refusing to turn
over to the Reich a last, pitifully small group
of Christians who had taken refuge there;  and
the fact that every Jew, Black-American, and
other "non-Aryan" in the US had been
systematically hunted down and murdered when the
US was defeated.  There was no resistance any
more, though at one point the cop talks to a top
American Army officer who mentions something
about "Pattonites," members of the American
Resistance who were slaughtered right along with
the "non-Aryans."
     There was even a scene in which a beggar,
probably a war veteran who'd lost a limb or
something, acosts the cop as the cop is walking
along a street in whatever city it is that serves
as the book's setting (New York?  I can't
remember), and pleas for alms "for Wodin's sake."
 When the cop hands him some coins, he thanks the
cop and says something like "may Wodin bless ye."
     If you want any more information, I'll be
happy to give what I can.  Thanks for going to
all this trouble for me.  :-)"

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager