LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  March 2005

ARSCLIST March 2005

Subject:

Call for papers

From:

Bryan E Cornell <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 17 Mar 2005 12:38:00 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (154 lines)

The Art of Record Production Conference
London
17th & 18th September 2005

Call for Papers

You are cordially invited to submit proposals for paper, poster or 
round table presentations at the 2005 conference on The Art of Record 
Production. The event will be co-hosted by Music Tank, CHARM (the AHRB 
Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music), and 
the London College of Music & Media, Thames Valley University. The 
conference seeks to explore the interface between  the recording 
industry and musicology. It aims to facilitate the transfer of 
knowledge between academics and professionals and to study the theory 
and practice of record production with reference to the technical and 
business interests of the industry.

Conference Themes

Towards a musicology of production
As musicology becomes increasingly oriented to music as a performing 
art, so recordings are increasingly understood as vital historical 
documents. But they are not the snapshots of historical performance as 
which they are often treated. With the development of tape, 
multitracking, and hard disc recording, the role of the producer became 
increasingly more important in determining the nature of the final 
product, seen less as the reproduction of a real performance than as 
the construction of a virtual one: recording has became an art form 
increasingly distinct from live performance. To date, however, 
musicology has not given serious attention to this development. The aim 
of this conference strand, promoted by CHARM, is to focus on the 
producer as a key creative figure in musical culture, classical as well 
as pop, and to consider the analytical, critical, and historical 
dimensions of a musicology of production.

Transparency and Distortion
What do the terms transparency and distortion really mean when applied 
to recording? What are the aims of recording techniques? How close can 
we get to an accurate reproduction of a musical event? Is clarity more 
important than realism (e.g. multiple close microphone placements, 
track laying and editing)? Why do we like some forms of distortion? How 
have commercial pressures affected the technical processes of 
recording, mixing and mastering? This session invites papers from a 
variety of disciplines investigating any of the above questions or 
those that are closely related. Amongst others papers may address 
issues of aesthetics, psychoacoustics and the use of technology, 
historical and cultural studies and socio-economics.

Recording and Authenticity
What are the perceived types of authenticity in recording practice? How 
do the aesthetics of mixing relate to commercial pressures and the 
perception of authenticity? Do musicians, technicians and audiences 
have different ideas about authenticity in differing musical cultures? 
How important is the concept of 'a performance' in authenticity? Why do 
the goal posts seem to be continually moving in the argument about what 
constitutes intrusive record production? Do issues of authenticity 
cloud the judgement of the sonic qualities of vintage recording 
equipment? This session invites papers from a variety of disciplines 
investigating any of the above questions or those that are closely 
related. Amongst others papers may address issues of sociology and 
social psychology, ethnomusicology and performance based musicology, 
aesthetics, production as performance and psychoacoustics.

Production Techniques and Technology
What have been the milestone changes in production techniques and 
technology? How much have recording technology and professional 
practice determined the sound of particular genres or geographical 
music cultures? How do creative and financial interests interact in the 
stimulation of product development? How have particular technological 
innovations had an identifiable effect on the development of recorded 
sound? What are the dynamics between the availability of cheap new 
technology and independent production trends and what are the 
implications for the future of production practice (home studios vs. 
professional facilities)? What's the relationship between formal 
training and the creative use of technology? How much are the 
'innovation giants' of record production merely the first person to use 
a particular technique on a record that became famous? This session 
invites papers from a variety of disciplines investigating any of the 
above questions or those that are closely related. Amongst others 
papers may address issues of historical and cultural analysis, 
socio-economics and the sociology of research culture, applied 
technology and musicology.

Recording Practice
Why are the norms of recording practice in various musical sectors so 
different? What goes on inside studios on a day to day level and how do 
the minutiae affect the final outcome? How do the social dynamics 
between musicians, sound engineers, producers and record company 
executives affect the recording process? How has scarcity of equipment 
been implemental in the development of particular generic 'sounds'? 
(e.g. Jamaican reggae, South African kwaito, garage rock etc). How have 
different modes of technical training in different musical cultures had 
an impact on the recorded output? How is the fact that different 
musical styles and cultures vary different textual parameters (e.g. 
melody and harmony in classical piano music, additive rhythmic patterns 
in west African Yoruba percussion music, vocal timbre in the Blues) 
significant in the different ways that recording practice has 
developed? This session invites papers from a variety of disciplines 
investigating any of the above questions or those that are closely 
related. Amongst others papers may address issues of historical and 
cultural analysis, ethnomusicology and performance based musicology, 
social psychology and education / training theory.

What is the product? What is the art object?
Is the analysis of recordings a worthwhile approach in the study of 
performance? What are the differences in the ways we analyse recordings 
and scores? How has the question of the intellectual ownership of music 
been undermined by the changing role of the record producer? How 
important have the commercial media of distribution and reproduction 
been in the shaping of musical form? How has remix culture affected the 
concept of a recording being the definitive artefact in Popular Music? 
What differences might the internet download system of music 
distribution be making to recording practice? How have the existence of 
multiple 'definitive' versions in western classical music recording 
affected the idea of the score as the art object? How has the recording 
industry affected musical cultures that are based on improvisation and 
variation? This session invites papers from a variety of disciplines 
investigating any of the above questions or those that are closely 
related. Amongst others papers may address issues of philosophy, 
aesthetics, performance based musicology, copyright law, cultural and 
media studies, ethnomusicology, jazz and popular music studies.

Production And Perception
In which ways can the perception of meaning in a sound be altered by 
technology? If musicologists are to analyse the contribution of both 
performers and producers to the creation of a recording, what tools are 
available to them and how can a common descriptive language be 
developed? In which ways do the creative uses of technology impact on 
our perception of a performance? How do gestalt grouping theories of 
music perception relate to audio processing techniques that alter the 
perceived clarity of a recording? How might theories of music as a 
metaphor for the embodied expression of emotions be borne out by the 
way certain audio treatments can emphasise or even alter the emotional 
content of a performance? This session invites papers from a variety of 
disciplines investigating any of the above questions or those that are 
closely related. Amongst others papers may address issues of music 
perception, psychoacoustics, audio product design, musicology.

Proposals for individual papers and poster presentations should not 
exceed 300 words.

Proposals for panels should include the names of all panel members and 
their individual contributions and should not exceed 1000 words.

The deadline for proposals is: 2nd May 2005

Proposals should be sent to: [log in to unmask] 
Or by post to:  Simon Zagorski-Thomas
                         London College of Music & Media
                         Thames Valley University
                         St. Mary's Road
                         London W5 5RF
                         U.K.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

September 2021
August 2021
July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager