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ARSCLIST  February 2006

ARSCLIST February 2006

Subject:

Re: Sound recordings in 2000 year old pottery...

From:

George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 24 Feb 2006 19:33:19 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (78 lines)

From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad


Jon Noring wrote
> Not sure if this is common knowledge among ARSCers. It's new to me.
>

----- alas, only too well known from a Belgian video clip. We only provided a 
leap second this change from 2005-2006, but it seems to have reversed 
terribly. It is not yet the season for this kind of information. If you use 
citation analysis, you will discover that it is Dr. I. Lirpa who is the real 
originator of this type of information. He has variously found the effect in 
Colombian pottery, Rembrandt paintings (vibrations in the tip of the brush as 
opposed to the bass response of the canvas), and apparently now in Pompei as 
well. I am not sure that you would really want to work in this type of 
phoneyrensic audio.

Kind regards,

George

----- my reply dated 20 February 2006:
From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad

Barbara Need distributed:


> I'm not sure how much I believe this, but it is certainly 
> interesting. (The pottery is from South America.)
> 
........................................> >
> >'Belgian researchers have been able to use computer scans of the grooves 
in
> >6,500-year-old pottery to extract sounds -- including talking and laughter 
--
> >made by the vibrations of the tools used to make the pottery.'
> >

----- this is a very surprising finding for two reasons: first of all, the 
making of pots is not a laughing matter.

Secondly, it is much too early in the year for information of this type - it
is not spring yet. Usually the scientist involved is Dr. I Lirpa.

Kind regards,


George



----------------------------------------------------
remainder of John Noring's mail of 24 February 2006: 
> Refer to: http://www.unknowncountry.com/news/?id=5153
> 
> "The video you can view by clicking on lier la video in this link
> contains sounds that have been derived by analyzing the grooves laid
> on a piece of pottery that was made at Pompeii over 2,000 years ago.
> There are words and, amazingly, human laughter. It's not a joke, but a
> serious archaeological effort. It seems that pottery all over the
> world contains sound in its groves, picked up naturally as the pots
> were made, in much the same way that an old wax recording was made."
> 
> 
> The short sound clip derived from the pottery groove is amazing.
> Not sure if anyone can make out the words spoken, but the laughter
> is clearly discernable.
> 
> I see a whole new field emerging of trying to recover sounds recorded
> into various types of objects, both man-made and even natural. (If
> anyone is interested here, let me know -- I'd be interested in working
> on such a project -- the ultimate audio forensics.)
> 
> 
> Enjoy!
> 
> Jon Noring

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