LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  May 2006

ARSCLIST May 2006

Subject:

Re: Triage, heroic efforts, and economics

From:

Karl Miller <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 23 May 2006 13:17:22 -0500

Content-Type:

TEXT/PLAIN

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (100 lines)

On Mon, 22 May 2006, Scott D. Smith wrote:

> And I must sadly agree that Peter is correct in his assessment of the
> situation regarding finding experienced engineers who have the knowledge
> and fortitude to take on some of the more challenging restoration and
> preservation tasks that come along in the course of dealing with old,
> damaged, and obsolete material.

I would wager that many of us doing this work grew up at time when reel to
reel tape machines and turntables were part of the normal process of
audio. When I was a kid I tinkered with my grandmother's wire recorder and
was used to playing 78s and recording discs. As long as we have materials
recorded in those older formats, knowledge of those formats will remain
important.

Unfortuately, this sort of knowledge is not considered worthwhile. The
other day I had a request for a quote (I maintain a business apart from my
University job) for some simple transfers of cassettes to CDs. Why this
could not be done in house seems odd to me.

Further, I work for a library director who sees no value in the skills
required to do such work, or in the need to pass along those skills to a
younger generation.

I wish I could be optimistic about things, but...yesterday a friend of
mine told me that the Philadelphia Orchestra cut the archivist position
out of their budget...is this true.

Then...a pianist on my label wrote the school where she got her graduate
degrees and asked for copies of the recitals. They sent her the master
tapes...no backups...it was as though they didn't care about the recorded
history of their school...aren't they required by law to keep
documentation of the degrees they grant...

> Despite that ready availability of information on the internet, I am
> astonished at the lack of knowledge displayed by some of those who are
> engaged in the field of "audio restoration". And I'm not talking about
> the "do it yourself" home enthusiast with a Teac tape deck and a Dell
> laptop. I mean staff who are engaged at commercial facilities and
> institutions.

While I don't think of myself as an engineer...I am reminded of some discs
brought to me...a "qualified" vendor couldn't get any sound out of the
discs. Turned out they were vertical cuts.

> These kinds of sad stories will continue unless there is a concerted
> effort on the part of institutions and archives to raise the funds
> necessary to train staff in the evaluation and processes involved in
> dealing with various recorded materials, as well as attracting some of
> the few people we still have left with us that understand the details of
> the many recorded mediums that we now have (I'm talking about those that
> don't exist on a hard drive) While there have been some great papers
> published on the subject, we have a long, long way to go in implementing
> the recommendations they contain.

Yes we do...and for me, not only is it the technical knowledge, but, when
dealing with the restoration of a music recording, the artistic knowledge
and abilities as well.

> Back to what Mike originally said, given the current state of affairs, I
> must say that I'm not holding my breath for any attention to be lavished
> on the problem at the federal or state funding level anytime soon.
> (Beyond what already is being done at NARA and the LOC)
>
> Sorry for the long post... 'nuff said.

As far as I am concerned, it wasn't a long post...while I know most of
mine are! I don't think enough has been said, nor do I believe enough has
been done, yet I wonder why...basically because there are not enough
economic incentives (lets face it, the law keeps there from being
any)...not a powerful enough lobby...not a good salesperson...not enough
visability...or, perhaps it is as I fear, not seen as being sufficiently relevant
to our society.

Why libraries see it important to digitize public domain published books
remains a mystery to me. Is it because they are public domain and scanning
a book is easier and seen as being less expensive and adds to their
"statistics"...well we scanned x number of books this year and it cost us
only $x when to save 100 hours of audio would require an equivalent
expenditure...plus libraries and archives don't have the expertise to do
the job right...and I am not saying libraries know what they are doing
when it comes to scanning either...is it because there is public domain
material they can host on the web to provide a demonstration of how many
"hits" they get in a year...

I guess one needs to start out by selling the notion that expertise is
necessary...can an automated tape duplicator tell us if signal loss was on
the tape, or the result of dropout produced by a buildup of oxide on the
tape head?

Then, as the cylinder project has done so very well...more projects which
tell people the treasures that there are...but then, with our
current laws, there is so little that archives can share...the Catch 22.

It is a rough road...unless we can find a significant benefactor...and if
we did, what would we do with the money...I know what I would do, but I
welcome your thoughts...

Karl

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager