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ARSCLIST  July 2007

ARSCLIST July 2007

Subject:

Re: New 1-bit recorders, was Re: SACD et al. sales figures

From:

Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 8 Jul 2007 20:13:26 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Parts/Attachments

text/plain (54 lines)

I'd like to know what is in the various archives of people on this list that can't be 
audibly-perfect transferred at either 96/24 or 192/24 PCM? I'd argue if you can find any measurable 
audio difference, there is something wrong in your digital conversion or PCM system, not in the 
format. There may be a slight argument that "something even better" is needed for commercial music 
recordings -- and only a very few of them are truly high fidelity. But for what I would guess is the 
vast, vast majority of what those of us on this list deal with, regular standard well-developed PCM 
should be the cat's whiskers.

-- Tom Fine


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John Ross" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, July 08, 2007 7:49 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] New 1-bit recorders, was Re: SACD et al. sales figures


> At  7/8/2007 03:31 PM, Doug Pomeroy wrote:
>>Well, SACD may yet have a life as a high-resolution capture format.
>>Korg (yes, Virginia, Korg!) has just announced their new, very portable
>>1-bit recorders: the MR-1 which records at 2.8 MHz ("260 minutes
>>in stereo"), and the M-1000 which records at 5.6 MHz ("520 minutes").
>>Prices are roughly $700 and $1200, respectively.  This is quite remarkable.
>>Archival transfers anyone?
>
> Let's hope not. The Korg or any other system that uses a proprietary file format is a poor choice 
> for long-term archival transfers and storage. All of the standards and best practices documents 
> recommend linear PCM over the various 1 bit alternatives for long-term preservation. More 
> importantly, any archival format must be based on commonly-accepted standard that do not depend 
> upon a single supplier's technology.
>
> Quoting IASA TC-04: "non-standard formats, resolutions and versions may not include
> preservation pathways that will enable long term access and future format migration." At this 
> point, the Korg uses a non-standard format as its only native storage option.
>
> The Library of Congress has published an analysis on the sustainability of digital formats at 
> http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/ Here are a few critical questions from this document:
>         Are the inner workings of the format disclosed publicly?
>         Has the format been widely adopted?
>         Is it transparent and open to analysis with basic tools?
>         Are there a range of tools available?
>         Can it facilitate self-documenting objects?
>         Does it depend on particular hardware or software or a limited number of  manufacturers?
>         Is it protected by a patent?
>
> At this point in time the Korg format fails in all of these areas.
>
> None of this is to argue that the Korg system does not produce very high-quality recordings. It 
> definitely does that. But for archival transfers, the best quality possible is still the wrong 
> choice if it depends on a single vendor and a proprietary format.
>
> John Ross 

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