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ARSCLIST  July 2007

ARSCLIST July 2007

Subject:

Re: Ana May Wong

From:

Alex Kogan <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 29 Jul 2007 09:05:33 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (201 lines)

I seem to recall that somebody was recently looking for footage of Ana May 
Wong; I had forgotten that one of our Producers' Showcase television 
programs included her in the cast.  If my recollection is correct, hopefully 
this response will get to that person.  The information is below.

Alex Kogan
Showcase Productions, Inc.
[log in to unmask]

"THE LETTER" (11/15/56) - drama by W. Somerset Maugham, adapted for 
television by Joseph Schrank, directed by William Wyler in his television 
debut (backed up by Kirk Browning); British southeast Asia plantation wife 
having an affair kills her lover before he can leave her for a Chinese 
woman, claiming self-defense, but the Chinese woman has the letter which the 
murderess wrote to her lover to set up the meeting; she steals her 
still-unaware husband's savings so that her lawyer can buy the letter back 
to protect the reputation of the husband, who is his friend; the wife is 
acquitted at the trial for lack of evidence, but when the husband learns the 
truth, he rejects her; stars Siobahn McKena, Michael Rennie, John Mills, 
Anna May Wong, John Irving.



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steven Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2007 12:18 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking


>I used to do this paint trick but with a grease pencil.  Of course you had 
>to clean the heads occassionally.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Doug Pomeroy" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2007 10:50 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking
>
>
>> Tom,
>>
>> Of course I would have worked with the source discs if they have been 
>> available to me. But sometimes you are given someone else's transfers and 
>> that's all you are going to get!
>>
>> I tried something similar years ago, using a plastic paint (Hyplar) which 
>> I would apply very carefully in a very thin line, using a very small 
>> paint brush, onto the oxide surface over the area of the click.  This 
>> actually worked - it wouldn't totally remove the click but would reduce 
>> its level dramatically since the paint would effectively lift the tape 
>> off the playback head by a microscopic amount.
>>
>> Of course, the computer allows us to isolate clicks with great accuracy 
>> and to lower them down to the level of the surrounding suface noise.  I 
>> do this all the time, but of course it doesn't always work, due to the 
>> nature of the underlying music at any given moment.  This is only one of 
>> several techniques which digital editing allows, especially when a stereo 
>> transfer is made of a mono recording.
>>
>> Doug Pomeroy
>> Pomeroy Audio
>> --------------------------------------
>>
>>>From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>>>Reply-To: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List 
>>><[log in to unmask]>
>>>To: [log in to unmask]
>>>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking
>>>Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2007 21:31:01 -0400
>>>
>>>Hi Doug:
>>>
>>>Thanks for the further info. I had never heard of this oxide-scraping 
>>>technique until today.
>>>
>>>Now you have me curious, so a followup. How come you'd be working with 
>>>old tapes from Davies and Towers instead of their source disks? Are there 
>>>cases where an old disk-to-tape transfer is preferable to going back to 
>>>the disk, or is it more likely the case that the original disk is lost or 
>>>destroyed?
>>>
>>>Finally, like I said I only did the tape method very little and have done 
>>>almost all of this kind of work in the computer. I learned from standing 
>>>over Art Shifrin's shoulder when he was working on some problematic disk 
>>>transfers. For loud ticks and pops in spoken word, it's usually OK to 
>>>just zoom in far enough to grab the microsecond of waveform and zap it. I 
>>>was surprised in one case that I zapped 50 such waveforms, spending a 
>>>solid 4 hours at it, and it eliminated all of ... 1.5 seconds from the 
>>>program time! In a half-hour spoken-word program, this is undetectable. 
>>>When it comes to music, it's not so simple. I've found that human beings' 
>>>own time-counting is "musical" (ie non-robotic, ie imprecise) enough that 
>>>some of these ticks and pops can be zapped, especially in pauses. Where 
>>>it doesn't work is in percussion notes or even a fast stacatto (sp?) of 
>>>any acoustic instrument. Back when I first got into computer-aided audio, 
>>>I would select the tick/pop waveform and reduce its level to something 
>>>lower than the surrounding music and that usually made it quiet enough to 
>>>not be detrimental to the listening experience. Then Art taught me how to 
>>>write out short ticks and pops by learning how to recognize what the 
>>>correct waveform SHOULD be and simply writing it in using the pencil tool 
>>>in Soundforge. This works great with what I call a linear disturbance --  
>>>ie when the needle doesn't jump the groove but merely rides over a 
>>>scratch or piece of crud or little vinyl zit. When the needle jumps the 
>>>groove like with a gouge or a big vinyl zit, all bets are off because 
>>>there is no underlying music to mimick. I try to avoid records in that 
>>>bad shape but sometimes you get 'em. After years of doing this, I've come 
>>>to the conclusion that the most natural-sounding solution is just reduce 
>>>the pop waveform to the level of the accompanying music. Any listener to 
>>>a disk transfer will know that the medium is mechanical and thus there 
>>>will be surface noises on even the best examples. That said, I'd love to 
>>>see the waveforms coming out of a laser turntable on similar surface 
>>>injuries. I would guess they'd be similar because a gouge or a big vinyl 
>>>zit is a manufacturing or handling error that actually destroys part of 
>>>the groove, so there can by fact be no underlying music to patch in. By 
>>>the way, I know a musician would cringe at this, but there have been a 
>>>few cases where the players so carefully replicate a phrase in its 
>>>repeated passage that I've been known to "loop" the undamaged phrase over 
>>>where there was a bad surface injury. The only time this has worked is 
>>>when the phrase is repeated so perfectly that there is no time-shift. 
>>>Some musicians are amazingly accurate with this, and yet don't sound 
>>>robotic like a synthesizer.
>>>
>>>-- Tom Fine
>>>
>>>----- Original Message ----- From: "Doug Pomeroy" 
>>><[log in to unmask]>
>>>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>>Sent: Friday, July 27, 2007 8:28 PM
>>>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking
>>>
>>>
>>>>Hi Tom,
>>>>
>>>>I assume the reference to "Jack" is a reference to Jack Towers.
>>>>He will tell you he got the oxide scraping technique from discussions
>>>>with the late John RT Davies. I have worked with some of John's tapes,
>>>>and I can report his scraping was VERY carefully done.  I have also 
>>>>worked
>>>>with some of Jack's tapes, and I have to say Jack usually took off too 
>>>>much
>>>>oxide, producing an obvious dropout; I had to fix lots of these, using
>>>>crossfades, or by careful deletion of part of the audible silence.
>>>>
>>>>doug pomeroy
>>>>
>>>>>From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>Reply-To: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List 
>>>>><[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>To: [log in to unmask]
>>>>>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking
>>>>>Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2007 19:52:44 -0400
>>>>>
>>>>>Hi Parker:
>>>>>
>>>>>I'm sorry, I misunderstood what you were describing. Now I understand. 
>>>>>That would absolutely work, but what an art form! Wow, I wonder what 
>>>>>Jack experimented on to learn the art.
>>>>>
>>>>>-- Tom Fine
>>>>>
>>>>>----- Original Message ----- From: "Parker Dinkins" 
>>>>><[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>Sent: Friday, July 27, 2007 8:14 AM
>>>>>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-clicking
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>on 7/26/07 8:06 PM US/Central, Tom Fine at [log in to unmask]
>>>>>>wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>But if you do Jack's method, you're left with the same problem as 
>>>>>>>Terry -- a
>>>>>>>microsecond of blank space, which is just as noticeable and annoying 
>>>>>>>as the
>>>>>>>click.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>By scraping off only the precise moment of the click, you're in effect
>>>>>>creating a high speed fadeout and fade-in. It's audible, but less 
>>>>>>annoying
>>>>>>than the click itself.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>There's an overview of analog and digital de-clicking at
>>>>>>http://www.cedaraudio.com/intro/declick_intro.html - but without a
>>>>>>description of manually scraping off the oxide.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>--
>>>>>>Parker Dinkins
>>>>>>MasterDigital Corporation
>>>>>>Audio Restoration + CD Mastering
>>>>>>http://masterdigital.com
>>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>_________________________________________________________________
>>>>http://liveearth.msn.com
>>>>
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> http://newlivehotmail.com 

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