LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  August 2008

ARSCLIST August 2008

Subject:

Re: The Hope of Audacity Was--Re: [ARSCLIST] Seeking recommendations for oral history digitization equipment (fwd)

From:

Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 16 Aug 2008 09:30:29 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (83 lines)

Hi Andy:

Again, hearing your concerns loud and clear, I suggest that any institution can gather up $50-100 
and buy the less-feature-rich version of a mainstream, supported program. Someone suggested Sony 
Soundforge Studio, for instance. $50 if you shop around. The added benefit is, if someone learns the 
interface on the "Lite" versions of these programs, they can then migrate to the full versions if 
more funding becomes available. Also note that most USB and Firewire A-D interfaces come with "Lite" 
versions of either Protools or a Steinberg or other program, but as I said earlier I'm not sure a 
program designed for multi-track music recording is ideal for archival audio transfer.

Also, here's a story that may lend some hope to the smaller/cash-starved institutions, although I 
certainly don't recommend this as a common practice. A friend of mine had some really nice off-air 
cassette recordings of some well-produced NPR programming from earlier this decade. He wanted this 
stuff in his digital library and his iPod. He still had the cassette deck it was recorded on (a 
Yamaha) and it worked well. The tapes had been stored properly and were not old anyway. Most of this 
audio is still available at NPR's website but in terrible RealAudio format, highly lossy and 
sounding terrible. This guy has a good FM tuner and his local NPR station in Albany has a very good 
signal. I suggested he try just plugging the cassette deck into his Mac and using Garage Band to 
capture the audio, perhaps needing to insert a level control in the line (turned out he didn't need 
to). He sent me some CD's of his transfers and the sound quality is superb, no worse than any FM 
reception I've heard. This was a an essentially no-cost solution for him since everything he used 
was included in equipment he already owned. As a followup, I think he's getting a little cocky here, 
but he wants to try LPs using the tape-out loop on his receiver. I said, you shouldn't get any worse 
results than you got with cassettes, but it's non-ideal. But I added, I will withold any conclusive 
judgement until I hear results because the FM recordings were excellent transfers.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Andy Kolovos" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2008 8:46 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] The Hope of Audacity Was--Re: [ARSCLIST] Seeking recommendations for oral 
history digitization equipment (fwd)


> Here here!
>
> I've been saying for several years now that, in addition to discussing best practices for large, 
> well-funded and well staffed institutions, ARSC should also be thinking about outlining "better 
> practices" for small organizations that lack staff and budgetary support to undertake "best 
> practices" audio preservation.  This is really critical because without scaled guidelines people 
> will continue to do one of two things: get overwhelmed by what the /can't do/ and therefore do 
> nothing or plow ahead and make some really bad choices.
>
> And I mean practices that range from storage of analog source material to transfer to storage of 
> digital files.  I field questions on this topic on an almost weekly basis from small historical 
> societies in VT, NE and from individual ethnographers and oral historians.
>
> andy
>
> Craig Breaden wrote:
>> I think it's important to understand that many small institutions --
>> such as county historical societies in my neck of the woods -- have
>> oral history holdings on tape, significant to the locale.  Archivists
>> at these institutions are routinely told their AV resources are at
>> risk and must be digitally transferred at the first opportunity.  What
>> does this opportunity look like for a budget-strapped institution, and
>> what is the risk of waiting versus using a capable, if rudimentary,
>> software? Better to let a patron hear a tape, or better to go ahead
>> and backup digitally and render a user copy, even given the
>> constraints? That's a real question for many folks. If they can get
>> together a volunteer (many of these archivists are virtually
>> volunteers themselves), a working playback deck, a PC, and a decent
>> audio interface, Audacity is their friend when they want to save a
>> tape and have to count, literally, every penny.  I've recommended it
>> before, and would again, as a reasonable option for generating a WAV
>> where budgets are tight or nonexistent.
>>
>> Craig
>>
>
> -- 
> Andy Kolovos
> Archivist/Folklorist
> Vermont Folklife Center
> 88 Main Street
> Middlebury, VT
> (802) 388-4964 [voice]
> (802) 388-1844 [fax]
> http://www.vermontfolklifecenter.org
> 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager