LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  November 2009

ARSCLIST November 2009

Subject:

Re: Nordskog's Disc Lathe

From:

George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 24 Nov 2009 00:16:04 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (73 lines)

From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad

Hello,

Martin Fisher wrote about this disc lathe, but the message looks as if there 
had been preceding messages that I have not received. I shall comment anyway. 


My first impression from looking at the firstcask image is that this is a 
mock-up, not a real thing at all. The top plate, which looks as if it is the 
only solid piece of metal in the whole construction, does have the general 
proportions and/or measurements of top plates of lathes used by for instance 
VTMC.

But my impression is not good. The spring barrel-like structure below the top 
plate would be much too weak to be able to carry a 5" radius (half of a 10 
inch record) past a cutting stylus when cutting. For cutting records you need 
a lathe construction, and that was a well-known general mechanical 
construction when Mr. Nordskog Sen. presumedly constructed this. For 
cylinders you could essentially copy an ordinary lathe and for discs you 
would copy a vertical lathe. There is no reason why a feedscrew could not be 
built in and linked by cogwheels, chain drive, or belt drive like ordinary 
lathes to do the job: an ordinary threaded rod would do and either a nut sawn 
through, lubricated and weighted (so that the half-nut would not be lifted up 
by the threads) would not be beyond somebody who was already putting a 
turntable on a bearing. You would definitely be able to use a reproducing 
soundbox as a recording soundbox, but there would be heavy low frequency 
resonances. The big record companies had done a lot of experimenting before 
they got to where they were in the early 1920s.

According to Sutton and Nauck the quality of the records was not good, but 
from a research point of view they might be ideal. These records would be a 
much better source for evaluating the construction than this image, which I 
do not believe in. I am, obviously, open to any kind of evidence to the 
contrary.

Kind regards,


George


Martin Fisher wrote:
> So I'm stuck in the past and just can't get out.
> 
> A few observations and questions regarding Arne Nordskog's disc lathe. 
> The
> references I've found so far state that the lathe was "driven by hand"
> which
> would seem to indicate that the TURNTABLE PLATTER was turned manually by
> crank as the cutting was done.  The two pictures I've located only give a
> top view from the front and right side.  These are the low resolution
> picture on the First Cask website
> http://firstcask.blogspot.com/search?q=nordskog and the picture on page 18
> of Floyd Levin's "Classic Jazz" book, available on Google Books.
> 
> These photos lead me to believe that the only "hand driven" portion of the
> lathe is the feed screw.  There is clearly a front wound spring motor
> present which probably drives the turntable.  A rudimentary crank is
> cobbled
> up on the right side which is most likely a manulal drive for the feed
> screw.  Without bottom photos it's a guess as to the linkage but it's
> relatively easy to figure the possibilities.
> 
> Are there any other clear photos of the lathe that would offer other clues
> or allow one to see fine details.  Looks to me like the
> reproducer/recorder
> is a Cheney vertical that was fitted for lateral cutting at an almost or
> perfect 90 degree angle to the surface.  And check out the tracking angle!
> Must be at least a three inch overhang.  Was this common??
> 
> Martin Fisher 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager