LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  January 2011

ARSCLIST January 2011

Subject:

Re: How many 78s to the Matrix

From:

Stewart Gooderman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Sat, 22 Jan 2011 14:13:38 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (59 lines)

Actually this was very helpful. 400K disks is a sort of roundabout 
figure. Thank you!

With respect to White Christmas, I don't know even know the origin of 
the master. I know in 1943, when they recorded the Rodgers and Hart 
revival of "A Connecticut Yankee" they actually used glass.

DrG

On 1/22/11 4:36 AM, Jolyon Hudson wrote:
> The problem is really to do with how many stamper can be pulled from the
> metal master and mother. In theory, and with care, this could be almost
> limitless but in practice something often got damaged. It was feasible to
> pull second metal master form the wax or acetate master but by the 1940s,
> with improved processes for making duplicate stampers, the original wax was
> unlikely to be kept.
>
> With each cleaning of the mother and the subsequent plating process to
> produce a stamper some wear would eventually occur so duplicate mothers were
> often made for popular records so that you could continue the production of
> pressings. Even then the mother would only last this wear and tear so long
> and a new mother would have to be taken from the metal master.
>
> So for a normal production of a record the stages would be:-
>
> wax master>  metal master>  mother>  stamper>  pressing
>
> The number of records a stamper could supply was somewhere in the region of
> 500-1500, stampers could wear out or something that got into the pressing
> material would damaged a particular stamper. The abrasiveness and makeup of
> the shellac would eventually cause the the metal in the stamper that equated
> to the trough of the groove to flatten out and the different thermal
> expansion and contraction rates of the metal and shellac from each pressing
> would also contribute to further erosion of the stamper. Some groove
> distortion would occur and the pressing material could very well adhere to
> the stamper and ruin it.
>
> So for a hypothetical production run of a million records a 1,000 stampers
> could be required, clearly one mother could not supply this many stampers
> and several mothers would have to be drawn from the metal master. Each stage
> of this process had it's risks and even if no accidental damage was caused
> to the original metal master it would still start to degrade from washing,
> polishing and plating.
>
> So if 20 mothers each produced 20 stampers which in turn each managed 1,000
> pressings then that would equal 400,000 discs.
>
> When I was looking at the microfilm of UK Columbia production cards of the
> 1920s at the British Library with Nick Morgan last year I was struck by the
> failure rate of producing a stamper adequate enough to make pressings,
> sometimes it took 10 attempts to get a satisfactory result - I wonder
> sometimes how any records ever got to be manufactured.
>
> There are so many variables to the manufacturing process  there is no exact
> way to calculate what any stamper produced. Doesn’t really answer your
> question! I would asume that something happened to the metal master and such
> that no more mothers could be made
>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager