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ARSCLIST  January 2012

ARSCLIST January 2012

Subject:

Re: Women in the record business

From:

David Lewis <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 22 Jan 2012 14:39:09 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (118 lines)

i have done my little bit through researching and writing my Wiki on Apollo:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Records_(1944)

Cary's book "Hot Jazz For Sale" goes into quite a bit of detail on Marili
Morden.

Dennis mentioned the Mary Howard Studio; Charles Ives was one of her
clients. He made his best recordings there, I suspect as she allowed him
take little catnaps
between takes.

UD

On Sun, Jan 22, 2012 at 1:49 PM, Aaron Levinson
<[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> I hope someone decides to undertake the task of writing a book, building a
> website or at least writing a comprehensive
> article about the contribution that women have made to the history of
> recording and independent record companies. Tom's mother is perhaps the
> most obvious example of someone with an extraordinary career but other like
> Helen Keane,
> Mae Axton and Florence Greenberg played a pivotal role as well and I think
> it is high time that what they, achieved against enormous odds, be
> rightfully acknowledged and indeed celebrated.
>
> AA
>
>
> On 1/22/12 1:19 PM, Bob Olhsson wrote:
>
>> There really is quite an untold story here that I only know little bits
>> and
>> pieces of.
>>
>> The patents on lots of the technology had expired during the 1940s. Tom
>> Dowd
>> told me this was what had really paved the way for there being an
>> independent record industry as we know it. Emory Cook came up with a
>> cutting
>> system that worked around the few remaining patents that would have
>> required
>> equipment leases only large companies could qualify for and royalties paid
>> on each record. Tom told me about weekly conference calls between himself,
>> Cook, Bill Putnam and a number of other well-known figures from the early
>> '50s because the majors still controlled most of the technical information
>> about record mastering and pressing. The only patents on magnetic
>> recording
>> were of somewhat questionable validity and Ampex never tried to patent
>> their
>> early technology.
>>
>> Armed Forces Radio had indeed trained a lot of personnel although this
>> created an almost totally male-dominated world of broadcast production and
>> engineering. I was fortunate to get my early audio production training in
>> Jr. and Sr. high school from two women who had been producers at NBC
>> during
>> the '30s and '40s only to get canned and replaced by veterans after the
>> war!
>>
>>
>> Bob Olhsson
>> 615.562.4346 http://www.bobolhsson.com http://audiomastery.com
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]**GOV <[log in to unmask]>] On
>> Behalf Of Steven Smolian
>> Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2012 9:18 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] LP period record business
>>
>> I agree there is a need for works covering the LP to CD era.
>>
>> There have been various articles and books that address pieces of this
>> era.
>> A good bibliography is the logical starting place- what do we already
>> know,
>> what else do se need to research, etc.
>>
>> I've been looking at a subset of the early LP classical record companies
>> as
>> I've become aware of how many were connected through their owners being
>> ex-patriot Hungarians.  Period, Vox, Stradavari, etc. Some issued only a
>> record or two and either failed pr morphed.   Many of the performers were
>> from the same part of the world and had the cultural and linguistic
>> comfort
>> that enabled them to go back to central Europe with scarce hard currency,
>> negotiate the complexities of the post-war political maze, and built
>> catalogs from Vienna, Stuttgart, Italy (Dario Soria), etc.
>>
>> Except for Soria, miost were Jewish.  This must have created some strong
>> personal conflicts when conducting business.
>>
>> Many of the labels of the earl 50s had personnel who arrived after WW II.
>> That included the outfits that cut records as well, and those who imported
>> the equipment used for high-quality recording.  Steve Temmer of Gotham was
>> one.
>>
>> These folks made up an important part of the industry that emerged as tape
>> replaced the lacquer disc.  This part of the story is still quite
>> incomplete.
>>
>> Another important thread is to trace the effect of the benefits of funding
>> for education and new businesses through various GI benefits. Many
>> servicemen were mustered out with significant nest egg accumulations, war
>> loot, etc.
>>
>> In short, a book drawn from the sources we already have would be a stopgap
>> awaiting further, well researched information.  So much of what we now
>> have
>> is history by press release. Cherchez le buck.
>>
>> Steve Smolian
>>
>>

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