LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  February 2012

ARSCLIST February 2012

Subject:

Re: Transcription discs and nitrate lacquer

From:

George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 18:26:53 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (184 lines)

From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad


Tom, 

thank you for this; ephemera like adverts have led a very hard life and very 
few actually survive. However, it is my distinct impression that professional 
lacquers were exclusively nitrate lacquer based. Anything that made recording 
noisier was avoided.

You mention Audio Devices; actually I was the person who wrote the 
introduction on the AES Historical Committee website to the link to Audio 
Record, which was their magazine. It is available from 1945-52, mostly 
complete, and I would consider browsing all of it a must for anybody 
seriously engaged in the recording and use of lacquer discs (or tape recorder 
history for that matter). It can be found, indeed on archive.org, at

http://www.archive.org/details/audiorecord4552newyrich

But I would definitely want others who have evidence to chime in; historical 
facts need to be correct, and we have seen too many instances of lore 
becoming fact by repetition.

Kind regards,


George

------------------------------------



> George and Dennis:
> 
> Some possible sources of information would be old newsletters and brochures
> put out by the 
> disk-recording manufacturers such as Presto, RCA and Western Electric. Also,
> old technical magazines 
> aimed at the broadcast business. I believe there are collections of such
> magazines at the LOC and 
> also at places like the Pavek Museum in Minnesota. I have no idea about
> analog sources in Europe and 
> elsewhere, I'm only speaking of the US business.
> 
> Basically, if the makers of recording blanks felt that removing nitrate from
> the recipe was a 
> selling point, there is marketing material about it somewhere. Never sell
> archive.org short for this 
> sort of thing, too. Their collection is not as well organized as some, but
> there is material up 
> there, for instance many old Audio Devices newsletters (I think Audio
> Devices entered the disk-blank 
> business long after nitrate wasn't used anymore).
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Dennis Rooney" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 11:00 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Transcription discs and nitrate lacquer
> 
> 
> > Dear George,
> >
> > Like so much concerning our area of interest, the information is not
> > documented. My knowledge comes from conversations over the years with
> > veteran studio engineers, who at various times individually corrobarated
> > the details posted earlier.
> >
> > DDR
> >
> > On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 10:34 AM, George Brock-Nannestad
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
> >
> >> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Hello Dennis [Rooney],
> >>
> >> you wrote
> >>
> >> > Although the first instantaneous blanks were cellulose nitrate, the
> >> > formula was later changed to cellulose acetate, hence the use of
> >> "acetate" as a
> >> > cognomen for discs which are properly called "lacquer(s)". The change
> was
> >> > prompted by some unfortunate accidents involving mastering engineers
> who
> >> > smoked while cutting lacquers. The vast majority of surviving lacquer
> >> > discs are cellulose acetate. No worries (at least not about
> >> combustibility).
> >> >
> >>
> >> ----- now, I have been chasing information like that for quite some
> time.
> >> Could you quote some sources, please? Newspaper reports are fine, but
> >> technical litereture would be better. The only reference to
> non-inflammable
> >> acetate lacquer discs I have been able to find concerns home recording
> >> discs
> >> from ca. 1938. All other sources, in particular for professional use,
> have
> >> referred to nitrate as the major constituent.
> >>
> >> The reason there is no need to worry about your lacquer discs in the
> >> archive
> >> is -- as Steve Greene surmised -- that the volume of nitrate to cooling
> >> carrier ratio is so small. Just like Blue Amberols. The reason
> mastering
> >> engineers sometimes had fires was 1) they were not using vacuum for
> >> removing
> >> the swarf and were careless, 2) if they used vacuum, as was the
> >> professional
> >> way, they deliberately set fire to the content in the can for swarf -
> wax
> >> was
> >> just as inflammable, and if you light steel wool it will continue to
> >> smolder
> >> until it is all iron oxide - it is the fine division that gives the
> >> problems.
> >>
> >> Best wishes,
> >>
> >>
> >> George
> >>
> >> -----------------------------------------------
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> >
> >> > On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Steve Greene <[log in to unmask]>
> >> > wrote:
> >> >
> >> > > Hello,
> >> > > First time poster here.  How big a concern is the storage of
> >> > transcription
> >> > > recordings, a majority of which are made of coated cellulose
> nitrate
> >> > > lacquer? Coming from a moving image background, the "n" word
> (NITRATE)
> >> > is
> >> > > scary, though presumably the volume of nitrate in even a large
> >> > collection
> >> > > of coated discs is tiny compared to even a small collection of
> nitrate
> >> > > film.  Were there components in the "recipe" for nitrate lacquer
> that
> >> > > tended to make them less combustible?
> >> > >
> >> > > Thanks in advance for your advice, perspectives.
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > > Steve Greene
> >> > > Archivist
> >> > > Office of Presidential Libraries
> >> > > National Archives and Records Administration
> >> > > (301) 837-1772
> >> > >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > Dennis D. Rooney
> >> > 303 W. 66th Street, 9HE
> >> > New York, NY 10023
> >> > 212.874.9626
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > -- 
> > Dennis D. Rooney
> > 303 W. 66th Street, 9HE
> > New York, NY 10023
> > 212.874.9626
> > 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager