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ARSCLIST  February 2012

ARSCLIST February 2012

Subject:

Re: Transcription discs and nitrate lacquer

From:

Andrew Hamilton <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:55:56 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (215 lines)

On Feb 29, 2012, at 4:27 PM, Jim Sam wrote:

> Except that dub the genre got its name from broadcasting and  
> recordist jargon.

(from Wackypedia) ...which got its name from a fabled session when an  
inadvertent muting of the vocals created a dub plate with only the  
orchestra. which (this dubbed dub plate) Tubby used in concert.


> [begin snob]
>
> Also note how one of dub's big three performers was more so playing
> instrumental reggae than dub; I wouldn't give up one of our words to
> the semantically-challenged without a fight.
>
> [end snob]


I believe that muting the vocals constitutes not only dub, but it can  
also be dubbed to a dub that way.    Are you saying that it has to  
have incongruous program superimposed?

(I was interested to learn that SNob is an abbreviation for "sine  
nobilitatus."   This allows a gentleman to add letters after his name  
when signing in at public school, just like noblemen do.  Only, in  
this case, it's Latin for "without nobility.")    (Respect)


>
> I actually find saying "lacquer" more aesthetically pleasing than
> saying "acetate."


...except that  "lacquer master" sounds as if the boss has gone  
missing.   0:


The best part about lacquer is how it reads - its spelling.   The  
string, "...cque...," does it for me.





Thanks and Praises,
      Andrew




>
> Jim
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 1:15 PM, Andrew Hamilton  
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> It's certainly more fun to say that one is going to cut an  
>> "acetate."    To
>> say, "...cut a dub," sounds like one is going to emulate King  
>> Tubby. since
>> the same word, Dub, implies a musical genre.
>>
>>
>>
>> - Andrew
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Feb 29, 2012, at 1:01 PM, Steve Greene wrote:
>>
>>> I think acetate was used "in parallel" mainly as an office dictation
>>> format, I've seen "Memovox" discs, Edison Voicewriter and Gray  
>>> Audograph
>>> discs in our collections.  All are very thin, the Memovox discs  
>>> tend to
>>> be warped and brittle.  Based on the "sample" I have access to,  
>>> lacquer
>>> discs took over in the mid 1930's, replacing solid metal discs of
>>> aluminum or zinc, or solid shellac discs.  Shellac continued to  
>>> be used
>>> for commercial pressings and some transcription discs through the
>>> 1950's, where it was replaced by vinyl.
>>>
>>> I too am under the impression that the lacquer used on laminated  
>>> discs
>>> was cellulose nitrate.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Steve Greene
>>> Archivist
>>> Office of Presidential Libraries
>>> National Archives and Records Administration
>>> (301) 837-1772
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Andrew Hamilton <[log in to unmask]> 2/29/2012 11:59 AM >>>
>>>
>>> I thought it was the other way around.   Acetate was replaced by
>>> nitrocellulose lacquer, but the name, acetate, lives on...
>>>
>>>
>>> From Wackypedia:
>>>
>>> "Despite their name, most acetate discs do not contain any acetate.
>>> Instead, most are an aluminum disc with a coating of nitrocellulose
>>> lacquer."
>>>
>>> Lacquer masters and dubs remain highly flammable - especially after
>>> near-vaporization by a heated stylus.   The swarf must be removed
>>> carefully from the chip jar (which also has some water in its
>>> bottom).    Then you take a huge clump outdoors and ignite it -  
>>> using
>>>
>>> a 10 foot match.    Weeeeeeeee!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Andrew
>>>
>>>
>>> (P.S., I visited the DDR in 1983.   Beautiful to see no
>>> advertisements or other vestige of decadent capitalism.   Sigh.)
>>>
>>>
>>> On Feb 29, 2012, at 9:53 AM, Dennis Rooney wrote:
>>>
>>>> Although the first instantaneous blanks were cellulose nitrate, the
>>>
>>>
>>>> formula
>>>> was later changed to cellulose acetate, hence the use of "acetate"
>>>> as a
>>>> cognomen for discs which are properly called "lacquer(s)". The
>>>> change was
>>>> prompted by some unfortunate accidents involving mastering
>>>> engineers who
>>>> smoked while cutting lacquers. The vast majority of surviving
>>>> lacquer discs
>>>> are cellulose acetate. No worries (at least not about
>>>
>>> combustibility).
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> DDR
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Steve Greene
>>>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hello,
>>>>> First time poster here.  How big a concern is the storage of
>>>>> transcription
>>>>> recordings, a majority of which are made of coated cellulose
>>>
>>> nitrate
>>>>>
>>>>> lacquer? Coming from a moving image background, the "n" word
>>>>> (NITRATE) is
>>>>> scary, though presumably the volume of nitrate in even a large
>>>>> collection
>>>>> of coated discs is tiny compared to even a small collection of
>>>>> nitrate
>>>>> film.  Were there components in the "recipe" for nitrate lacquer
>>>
>>> that
>>>>>
>>>>> tended to make them less combustible?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance for your advice, perspectives.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Steve Greene
>>>>> Archivist
>>>>> Office of Presidential Libraries
>>>>> National Archives and Records Administration
>>>>> (301) 837-1772
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Dennis D. Rooney
>>>> 303 W. 66th Street, 9HE
>>>> New York, NY 10023
>>>> 212.874.9626
>>>
>>>
>>> Serif Sound ♬ CD Premastering
>>> ➣ Dingbat Lacquer Sound Disc
>>> Andrew Hamilton, clerk
>>> 1 (513) 542-3555
>>> www.serifsound.com
>>
>>
>> Serif Sound ♬ CD Premastering
>> ➣ Dingbat Lacquer Sound Disc
>> Andrew Hamilton, clerk
>> 1 (513) 542-3555
>> www.serifsound.com

Serif Sound ♬ CD Premastering
➣ Dingbat Lacquer Sound Disc
Andrew Hamilton, clerk
1 (513) 542-3555
www.serifsound.com

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