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EAD  February 2012

EAD February 2012

Subject:

Re: Digitized objects provided in bulk from the finding aid (easy as 1, 2, 3?)

From:

Joyce Chapman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Encoded Archival Description List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 22 Feb 2012 15:23:01 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (209 lines)

In addition to Barbara's suggested resources, I would add the article
in a recent Archival Outlook by Laura Clark Brown titled "Give Fair
Use a Fair Shake" on copyright and providing equitable access to
digital records, as well as the Triangle Research Libraries Network's
"Intellectual Property Rights Strategy for Digitization of Modern
Manuscript Collections and Archival Records Groups," which came out in
January 2011. The document details our risk management practices for
large-scale digitization. You can read it online here:
http://www2.trln.org/ccc/ipstrategy.htm or download a PDF here:
http://www.trln.org/IPRights.pdf

Joyce


On Wed, Feb 22, 2012 at 1:01 PM, Aikens, Barbara <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> There was a session devoted to this topic at SAA last year, “Rights, Risks and Realities.”
>
>
>
> Merrilee Proffitt was chair and referenced OCLC’s “Well Intentioned Practices” position paper which is about adopting a risk assessment approach to large scale digitization.  The paper can be accessed via a link found on this page http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/rights/.
>
> Jean Dryden presented the results of her studies about how Canadian and U.S. “archival repositories control further uses of their online holdings and their reasons for doing so.”  Dr. Dryden recently published these results in the latest issue of American Archivist.
>
> Peter Hirtle presented a paper entitled “75 Years of Archivists at Risk” wherein he advocated a risk assessment approach that might be more liberal than many archivists are comfortable with.  But he pointed out that archivists have always taken risks.  His closing slide states “We need to be respectful, but not afraid.”  and “We need to encourage others to use and build on our collections.”
>
> My presentation “Risqué Business: Digitizing the Papers of Artists” was presented from the case study perspective and represented the realities of the Archives of American Art’s large scale digitization initiative http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/online  – 110 fully digitized collections measuring over 1,000 linear feet, represented by 1.5 million digital images available online and accessed via an EAD finding aid.  Since starting our program six years ago, we’ve had only ONE complaint and we simply made the image thumbnail access only.
>
>
>
> Barbara D. Aikens
>
>
>
> Chief, Collections Processing
>
> Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
>
> Ph: 202-633-7941
>
> email:  [log in to unmask]
>
> website:  aaa.si.edu
>
> Mailing Address
>
> Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
>
> PO Box 37012
>
> Victor Bldg., Suite 2200, MRC 937
>
> Washington, DC  20013-7012
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Kyle Rimkus
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2012 10:36 AM
>
>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Digitized objects provided in bulk from the finding aid (easy as 1, 2, 3?)
>
>
>
> Great thread!  If it isn't too late to chip in, I have a policy question related to Mark's initial post.  I also see making digital special collections content from finding aids available for off-line research as a virtue, but I wonder what criteria are in place at institutions that make such materials freely available for download in bulk.  While we would love to provide this level of functionality to our researchers at my institution, reservations have been expressed about the risk of too greatly facilitating the potential use and abuse of our digitized content outside of our own access systems.  I know that this topic has been discussed at length in the digital library world, but I'd appreciate it if anyone on this list has any insight to offer on whether the trend towards large scale digitization and the integration of digital content into finding aids has led to any new and interesting access policies.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Kyle
>
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 17, 2012 at 9:44 AM, Michele R Combs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Joyce – that is a VERY cool approach.  Thanks for all the detail!
>
>
>
> Michele
>
>
>
> From: Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Joyce Chapman
> Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:14 PM
>
>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Digitized objects provided in bulk from the finding aid (easy as 1, 2, 3?)
>
>
>
> The Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has about 270,000 digital objects from 416 different collections linked directly from finding aids. These are not easily downloaded in bulk, but the system for digitization and linking digital content is low cost and simple. Content is linked at the folder level, and there is no additional item-level metadata created for digital objects, they simply inherit the folder-level metadata. This system was developed as part of a program called the "Digital Southern Historical Collection," which is a large-scale digitization program with no end date. The goal is the digitization of the entire holdings of the SHC.
>
>
>
> The two main components of the delivery system for the Digital SHC are the online finding aid and CONTENTdm Digital Collection Management Software. The HTML finding aid serves as the main discovery platform for digitized content, which resides in CONTENTdm. The decision to use finding aids as the main access point was made based on feedback from patrons who expect to be able to shift seamlessly between online description and digital content.
>
> In 2009 when the program was being planned, staff knew it would be monumentally time consuming to encode thousands of <dao> or hyperlinks into finding aids by hand, nor did it fit with the goal to begin a low-cost, programmatic approach to large-scale digitization that was not dependent on significant funding for staff. So the XSLT script that transforms finding aids was modified to add unique IDs to the HTML output for every EAD <container> (regardless of whether there might be digital content), and developers in library Systems created a lightweight application programming interface to CONTENTdm and authored a javascript that uses AJAX calls to the CONTENTdm API to dynamically create links to the digitized content in the HTML finding aid container lists. No extra EAD encoding or modification of finding aids is required in order for links to newly digitized content to appear. This client-side, real-time approach ensures that as new content from any collection is digitized and loaded into CONTENTdm, it becomes immediately available to users through the finding aid, without any further intervention from staff.
>
> Here's an example of a finding aid linked to digital content:
>
> http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/t/Trist,Nicholas_Philip.html
>
>
> In 2011 the Triangle Research Libraries Network (composed of the libraries of Duke, North Carolina Central University, UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University) received funding from the State Library of North Carolina for the grant "Content, Context, and Capacity: a Collaborative Large-Scale Digitization Project on the Long Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina" (www.trln.org/ccc). As part of this grant, the four libraries will work together to digitize 40 archival collections and to link the digital content for all of them directly from their finding aids. Additionally, digital content from all four university libraries will be linked from finding aids in the shared Search TRLN catalog (http://search.trln.org/).
>
>
>
> Joyce
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Custer, Mark <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> >
> >
> > I really like how the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago provides access to digitized content via their online finding aids.  It’s simple, it preserves context, and – perhaps most importantly – it’s available for off-line research.  For examples of how they provide access, see the “inventory” section within any of the finding aids on the following webpage:
> >
> > http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/findingaids/browse.php?browse=digital
> >
> >
> >
> > I also really, really, really like the University of North Texas Digital Library, http://digital.library.unt.edu/, which provides exemplary item-level webpages that push everything out (from metadata, use stats, and even the ability to download images, albeit one at a time, in this case) in a clean and clear user interface.
> >
> >
> >
> > So, my questions are:
> >
> >
> >
> > 1.       Can anyone point me to other examples, like the University of Chicago, which provide easy access, whether via bulk downloads or a single packaged file, to digitized (or born-digital) objects that have been arranged by an archives?
> >
> >
> >
> > For example, I just found another great example provided by the Portal de Archivos Espaoñles (http://pares.mcu.es/) by way of the awesome APEnet portal (http://www.archivesportaleurope.eu/).  So, I know that there must be many more examples out there!
> >
> >
> >
> > 2.       How about any other examples like the UNT Digital Library, especially if those are tied to EAD finding aids?
> >
> >
> >
> > 3.       What about an ideal combination of the above?
> >
> >
> >
> > Any and all examples are welcome,
> >
> >
> >
> > Mark
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
> --
> Joyce Chapman
> Triangle Research Libraries Network
> CB# 3926, Wilson Special Collections Library
> Chapel Hill, NC 27514-8890
> Phone: (919) 962-1345
> Email: [log in to unmask]
> Website: www.trln.org/ccc
>
>
>
>
> --
> Kyle R. Rimkus
>
> Head of Digital Scholarship and Programs
>
> University of Miami Libraries
>
>
>
>




--
Joyce Chapman
Triangle Research Libraries Network
CB# 3926, Wilson Special Collections Library
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-8890
Phone: (919) 962-1345
Email: [log in to unmask]
Website: www.trln.org/ccc

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