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ARSCLIST  February 2013

ARSCLIST February 2013

Subject:

Red Vinyl

From:

Art Shifrin <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 25 Feb 2013 00:39:06 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (3647 lines)

Who did the pressing of the Franklin Mint's red vinyl, a large set of which
is still at my Mom's home in Florida.

Best,
Art (Shiffy) Shifrin

On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 12:00 AM, ARSCLIST automatic digest system <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> There are 29 messages totalling 2963 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts (10)
>   2. Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous lessons (8)
>   3. [GRAYMAIL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Digitizing 10,000+ audio cassettes
>   4. New York Chapter meeting notices (2)
>   5. RCA red vinyl for digital (8)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 08:21:58 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> One man's opinions ...
>
> It seemed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a reasonable
> percentage of presentations
> that were more about "making your bones in academia" than being relevant
> to ARSC members. Very
> obtuse subject matter, more appropriate for a doctoral thesis presentation
> in some cases. In other
> cases, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been interesting
> material. So you could cut out
> some fat and have longer presentations of substance. Number of
> presentations is not a good measure
> of anything, in my opinion.
>
> Maybe this would work -- first-timers get 35 minutes max. Let them prove
> themselves. It's then up to
> the presentation committee to decide if they are worthy of an invitation
> to present again at a
> future conference. Maybe let them know this going in, so they make it a
> point to make that a good 35
> minutes because their reputation is on the line with ARSC. Those who have
> been deemed interesting
> enough to be invited back should be told that there's a standing
> invitation but the invitation will
> be re-evaluated each time they present. This encourages people to stay on
> their A game. The
> returning veterans should be given up to 60 minutes, but should have to
> justify to the committee why
> they need more than 35 minutes. This will allow them to consider carefully
> if they really do have 60
> minutes of material or if they could condense it to 35 minutes.
>
> 20 minute slots should be eliminated unless they are mini-presentations as
> part of a panel
> discussion (i.e. setting out the parameters of the discussion, or
> presenting some audio before the
> discussion).
>
> There should probably be a separate discussion about if these rules would
> work equally well for
> history/discography and technical topics. The way ARSC is today, there
> needs to be a heavy technical
> emphasis in the programs, and some technical stuff is a very deep dive and
> may even take more than
> 60 minutes. That said, I thought some of the technical sessions I attended
> were overly long -- in
> other words a lot of jargon around very little action or accomplishment.
> Do you really need 35
> minutes to tell everyone how you "assess" a grooved record (i.e. look at
> it and see how scratched up
> it is)? On the other hand, if you're laying out a complex
> database/metadata structure -- which is
> likely to be of great interest to others tasked with that job -- you
> should have the amount of time
> you need to get enough information across to be of use to those in
> attendance, otherwise it's not
> worth any amount of their time, or yours.
>
> A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for historical/discographical
> presentations might be, if it's
> very specific (i.e. one artist's time on one label, one piece of music or
> one album, one little
> record label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something sweeping,
> like for instance the history
> of jazz in Kansas City, that deserves an hour but make sure the presenter
> is willing to do the work
> to fill the hour with interesting material.
>
> Another possibility to consider -- if someone is basically re-iterating
> something published in ARSC
> Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral thesis), perhaps
> they should be restricted to
> 35 minutes. If they are presenting new, interesting (as deemed by the
> presentations committee)
> material, give them more time because that will encourage them to develop
> enough material for a good
> ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous cycle.
>
> Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if short time slots
> lead to shallow, useless
> presentations. Very few things can be well-explained in 20 minutes. A few
> things need more than 35
> minutes, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt to
> longtime members." It
> should only go long if it's worth the extra time, possibly at the expense
> of someone else's
> opportunity to present. Not to be given lightly, but should be given when
> deserved.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Steve Ramm" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 11:03 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
>
> > In a message dated 2/23/2013 6:32:07 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> > [log in to unmask] writes:
> >
> > It is  not an easy job putting the
> > schedule together, and I sometimes wish the  Prog Chair would ask some of
> > us for advice.
> >
> >
> > I'll remind ALL on the ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get to
> > vote in the upcoming election that the decision is yours. There were be
> > candidates for Second Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots going
> out
> > next month. The winner of that office will be program chair for the 2014
> and
> > 2015 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to exercise your vote and
> decide who
> > would make the better Program Chair. It is that person's job to plan and
> > schedule and accept (or reject) program papers.  (I will remind you, of
> > course, that without concurrent sessions, there will be 40% less papers
> > presented. (and it they are 60 vs 35 minutes in length, there will be
> 65% less
> > papers than there were in 2012.
> >
> >
> > Steve
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 09:10:53 -0500
> From:    Steve Smolian <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> Some academics get travel funds only if they participate in a program.
>
> I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of many presentations and in
> the
> concurrent sessions issue.  When there is a conflict, I almost always go to
> the technical sessions and deeply resent not being able to attend those
> relating to recording history.  Grrrr!
>
> As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as much as I can
> into that time, and to heck with questions.  So do others.  Lots of bad
> info
> floats around unchallenged.
>
> On the other hand, I generally dislike the zombie panels where old stars
> reminisce.  I spend the $ 1,000 it costs to travel and register for
> information, not entertainment.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tom Fine
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:21 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
> One man's opinions ...
>
> It seemed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a reasonable
> percentage of presentations
> that were more about "making your bones in academia" than being relevant to
> ARSC members. Very
> obtuse subject matter, more appropriate for a doctoral thesis presentation
> in some cases. In other
> cases, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been interesting material.
> So you could cut out
> some fat and have longer presentations of substance. Number of
> presentations
> is not a good measure
> of anything, in my opinion.
>
> Maybe this would work -- first-timers get 35 minutes max. Let them prove
> themselves. It's then up to
> the presentation committee to decide if they are worthy of an invitation to
> present again at a
> future conference. Maybe let them know this going in, so they make it a
> point to make that a good 35
> minutes because their reputation is on the line with ARSC. Those who have
> been deemed interesting
> enough to be invited back should be told that there's a standing invitation
> but the invitation will
> be re-evaluated each time they present. This encourages people to stay on
> their A game. The
> returning veterans should be given up to 60 minutes, but should have to
> justify to the committee why
> they need more than 35 minutes. This will allow them to consider carefully
> if they really do have 60
> minutes of material or if they could condense it to 35 minutes.
>
> 20 minute slots should be eliminated unless they are mini-presentations as
> part of a panel
> discussion (i.e. setting out the parameters of the discussion, or
> presenting
> some audio before the
> discussion).
>
> There should probably be a separate discussion about if these rules would
> work equally well for
> history/discography and technical topics. The way ARSC is today, there
> needs
> to be a heavy technical
> emphasis in the programs, and some technical stuff is a very deep dive and
> may even take more than
> 60 minutes. That said, I thought some of the technical sessions I attended
> were overly long -- in
> other words a lot of jargon around very little action or accomplishment. Do
> you really need 35
> minutes to tell everyone how you "assess" a grooved record (i.e. look at it
> and see how scratched up
> it is)? On the other hand, if you're laying out a complex database/metadata
> structure -- which is
> likely to be of great interest to others tasked with that job -- you should
> have the amount of time
> you need to get enough information across to be of use to those in
> attendance, otherwise it's not
> worth any amount of their time, or yours.
>
> A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for historical/discographical
> presentations might be, if it's
> very specific (i.e. one artist's time on one label, one piece of music or
> one album, one little
> record label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something sweeping, like
> for instance the history
> of jazz in Kansas City, that deserves an hour but make sure the presenter
> is
> willing to do the work
> to fill the hour with interesting material.
>
> Another possibility to consider -- if someone is basically re-iterating
> something published in ARSC
> Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral thesis), perhaps they
> should be restricted to
> 35 minutes. If they are presenting new, interesting (as deemed by the
> presentations committee)
> material, give them more time because that will encourage them to develop
> enough material for a good
> ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous cycle.
>
> Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if short time slots
> lead to shallow, useless
> presentations. Very few things can be well-explained in 20 minutes. A few
> things need more than 35
> minutes, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt to
> longtime members." It
> should only go long if it's worth the extra time, possibly at the expense
> of
> someone else's
> opportunity to present. Not to be given lightly, but should be given when
> deserved.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Steve Ramm" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 11:03 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
>
> > In a message dated 2/23/2013 6:32:07 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> > [log in to unmask] writes:
> >
> > It is  not an easy job putting the
> > schedule together, and I sometimes wish the  Prog Chair would ask some of
> > us for advice.
> >
> >
> > I'll remind ALL on the ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get to
> > vote in the upcoming election that the decision is yours. There were be
> > candidates for Second Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots going
> > out
> > next month. The winner of that office will be program chair for the 2014
> > and
> > 2015 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to exercise your vote and decide
> > who
> > would make the better Program Chair. It is that person's job to plan and
> > schedule and accept (or reject) program papers.  (I will remind you, of
> > course, that without concurrent sessions, there will be 40% less papers
> > presented. (and it they are 60 vs 35 minutes in length, there will be 65%
> > less
> > papers than there were in 2012.
> >
> >
> > Steve
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 10:49:42 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> One solution might be to make Thursday all music/discography day and
> Saturday all
> technology/archiving day, with Friday being some sort of mix with a longer
> morning session for ARSC
> business. This could then help people like Steve and myself avoid being
> torn between something of
> curiosity to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a technical
> session that we know we should
> attend to justify the cost of travel (ie it will help our business, which
> funds the travel).
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 9:10 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
>
> > Some academics get travel funds only if they participate in a program.
> >
> > I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of many presentations and in
> the concurrent sessions
> > issue.  When there is a conflict, I almost always go to the technical
> sessions and deeply resent
> > not being able to attend those relating to recording history.  Grrrr!
> >
> > As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as much as I
> can into that time, and to
> > heck with questions.  So do others.  Lots of bad info floats around
> unchallenged.
> >
> > On the other hand, I generally dislike the zombie panels where old stars
> reminisce.  I spend the $
> > 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not entertainment.
> >
> > Steve Smolian
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Tom Fine
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:21 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
> >
> > One man's opinions ...
> >
> > It seemed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a reasonable
> percentage of presentations
> > that were more about "making your bones in academia" than being relevant
> to ARSC members. Very
> > obtuse subject matter, more appropriate for a doctoral thesis
> presentation in some cases. In other
> > cases, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been interesting
> material. So you could cut out
> > some fat and have longer presentations of substance. Number of
> presentations is not a good measure
> > of anything, in my opinion.
> >
> > Maybe this would work -- first-timers get 35 minutes max. Let them prove
> themselves. It's then up
> > to
> > the presentation committee to decide if they are worthy of an invitation
> to present again at a
> > future conference. Maybe let them know this going in, so they make it a
> point to make that a good
> > 35
> > minutes because their reputation is on the line with ARSC. Those who
> have been deemed interesting
> > enough to be invited back should be told that there's a standing
> invitation but the invitation
> > will
> > be re-evaluated each time they present. This encourages people to stay
> on their A game. The
> > returning veterans should be given up to 60 minutes, but should have to
> justify to the committee
> > why
> > they need more than 35 minutes. This will allow them to consider
> carefully if they really do have
> > 60
> > minutes of material or if they could condense it to 35 minutes.
> >
> > 20 minute slots should be eliminated unless they are mini-presentations
> as part of a panel
> > discussion (i.e. setting out the parameters of the discussion, or
> presenting some audio before the
> > discussion).
> >
> > There should probably be a separate discussion about if these rules
> would work equally well for
> > history/discography and technical topics. The way ARSC is today, there
> needs to be a heavy
> > technical
> > emphasis in the programs, and some technical stuff is a very deep dive
> and may even take more than
> > 60 minutes. That said, I thought some of the technical sessions I
> attended were overly long -- in
> > other words a lot of jargon around very little action or accomplishment.
> Do you really need 35
> > minutes to tell everyone how you "assess" a grooved record (i.e. look at
> it and see how scratched
> > up
> > it is)? On the other hand, if you're laying out a complex
> database/metadata structure -- which is
> > likely to be of great interest to others tasked with that job -- you
> should have the amount of
> > time
> > you need to get enough information across to be of use to those in
> attendance, otherwise it's not
> > worth any amount of their time, or yours.
> >
> > A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for historical/discographical
> presentations might be, if it's
> > very specific (i.e. one artist's time on one label, one piece of music
> or one album, one little
> > record label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something sweeping,
> like for instance the
> > history
> > of jazz in Kansas City, that deserves an hour but make sure the
> presenter is willing to do the
> > work
> > to fill the hour with interesting material.
> >
> > Another possibility to consider -- if someone is basically re-iterating
> something published in
> > ARSC
> > Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral thesis), perhaps
> they should be restricted
> > to
> > 35 minutes. If they are presenting new, interesting (as deemed by the
> presentations committee)
> > material, give them more time because that will encourage them to
> develop enough material for a
> > good
> > ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous cycle.
> >
> > Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if short time
> slots lead to shallow, useless
> > presentations. Very few things can be well-explained in 20 minutes. A
> few things need more than 35
> > minutes, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt
> to longtime members." It
> > should only go long if it's worth the extra time, possibly at the
> expense of someone else's
> > opportunity to present. Not to be given lightly, but should be given
> when deserved.
> >
> > -- Tom Fine
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Steve Ramm" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 11:03 PM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
> >
> >
> >> In a message dated 2/23/2013 6:32:07 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> >> [log in to unmask] writes:
> >>
> >> It is  not an easy job putting the
> >> schedule together, and I sometimes wish the  Prog Chair would ask some
> of
> >> us for advice.
> >>
> >>
> >> I'll remind ALL on the ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get to
> >> vote in the upcoming election that the decision is yours. There were be
> >> candidates for Second Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots
> going out
> >> next month. The winner of that office will be program chair for the
> 2014 and
> >> 2015 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to exercise your vote and
> decide who
> >> would make the better Program Chair. It is that person's job to plan and
> >> schedule and accept (or reject) program papers.  (I will remind you, of
> >> course, that without concurrent sessions, there will be 40% less papers
> >> presented. (and it they are 60 vs 35 minutes in length, there will be
> 65% less
> >> papers than there were in 2012.
> >>
> >>
> >> Steve
> >>
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 10:58:57 -0500
> From:    Doug Pomeroy <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> Before the conference in Los Angeles, Tim Brooks circulated an excellent
> advisory for presenters concerning a/v matters.  He urged us all to =
> check the
> playback of our CDs and visuals with the operator of the equipment the =
> night=20
> before the scheduled presentation.  I met the person running the =
> equipment on
> the night before my talk, we checked the playback level and I gave her =
> my CD=20
> and a clear listing of the track numbers.  =15Despite this, there were =
> problems
> finding the CD, with the playback level, and with track selection. =20
>
> I am told the hotel supplies these a/v people, and sometimes they are =
> good
> and often not.  But I would vote for spending whatever is necessary to =
> hire
> a profesional company.
>
> Mike Biel wrote:
>
> >  FINALLY we got the exec board to put some money out to hire
> > pros, but even those were not always good.
>
> Doug Pomeroy
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 09:07:23 -0700
> From:    Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> Tom -- I think you got it backwards.  We do not want similar
> sessions=0Aopp=
> osite each other, we need different sessions opposite.  Having
> two=0Adiscog=
> raphical/collecting sessions opposite each other is what the=0Aproblem is.
> =
>  Many in the group don't care about the technical and=0Aarchivist
> catalogin=
> g sessions, and some ONLY care about these and don't=0Acare about the
> music=
> al content or ancient performers.  =0A=0AMike Biel  [log in to unmask] =0A=0A=
> -------- Original Message --------=0A=0AFrom: Tom Fine <tflists@BEVERAGE-DI
> =
> GEST.COM>=0A=0A=0AOne solution might be to make Thursday all
> music/discogra=
> phy day and=0ASaturday all =0Atechnology/archiving day, with Friday being
> s=
> ome sort of mix with a=0Alonger morning session for ARSC =0Abusiness. This
> =
> could then help people like Steve and myself avoid being=0Atorn between
> som=
> ething of =0Acuriosity to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a
> tech=
> nical=0Asession that we know we should =0Aattend to justify the cost of
> tra=
> vel (ie it will help our business,=0Awhich funds the travel).=0A=0A-- Tom
> F=
> ine=0A=0A----- Original Message ----- =0AFrom: "Steve Smolian" <smolians@ER
> =
> OLS.COM>=0ATo: <[log in to unmask]>=0ASent: Sunday, February 24,
> 201=
> 3 9:10 AM=0ASubject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling-
> You=
> r vote=0Acounts=0A=0A=0A> Some academics get travel funds only if they
> part=
> icipate in a program.=0A>=0A> I agree with Mike both in the too shortness
> o=
> f many presentations and in the concurrent sessions =0A> issue. When there
> =
> is a conflict, I almost always go to the technical sessions and deeply
> rese=
> nt =0A> not being able to attend those relating to recording history.
> Grrrr=
> !=0A>=0A> As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as
> much=
>  as I can into that time, and to =0A> heck with questions. So do others.
> Lo=
> ts of bad info floats around unchallenged.=0A>=0A> On the other hand, I
> gen=
> erally dislike the zombie panels where old stars reminisce. I spend the $ =
> =0A> 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not
> entertainme=
> nt.=0A>=0A> Steve Smolian=0A>=0A>=0A>=0A>=0A> -----Original Message----- =
> =0A> From: Tom Fine=0A> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:21 AM=0A> To:
> ARS=
> [log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference
> Program =
> scheduling- Your vote counts=0A>=0A> One man's opinions ...=0A>=0A> It
> seem=
> ed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a reasonable percentage
> of=
>  presentations=0A> that were more about "making your bones in academia"
> tha=
> n being relevant to ARSC members. Very=0A> obtuse subject matter, more
> appr=
> opriate for a doctoral thesis presentation in some cases. In other=0A>
> case=
> s, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been interesting material. So
> =
> you could cut out=0A> some fat and have longer presentations of substance.
> =
> Number of presentations is not a good measure=0A> of anything, in my
> opinio=
> n.=0A>=0A> Maybe this would work -- first-timers get 35 minutes max. Let
> th=
> em prove themselves. It's then up =0A> to=0A> the presentation committee
> to=
>  decide if they are worthy of an invitation to present again at a=0A>
> futur=
> e conference. Maybe let them know this going in, so they make it a point
> to=
>  make that a good =0A> 35=0A> minutes because their reputation is on the
> li=
> ne with ARSC. Those who have been deemed interesting=0A> enough to be
> invit=
> ed back should be told that there's a standing invitation but the
> invitatio=
> n =0A> will=0A> be re-evaluated each time they present. This encourages
> peo=
> ple to stay on their A game. The=0A> returning veterans should be given up
> =
> to 60 minutes, but should have to justify to the committee =0A> why=0A>
> the=
> y need more than 35 minutes. This will allow them to consider carefully if
> =
> they really do have =0A> 60=0A> minutes of material or if they could
> conden=
> se it to 35 minutes.=0A>=0A> 20 minute slots should be eliminated unless
> th=
> ey are mini-presentations as part of a panel=0A> discussion (i.e. setting
> o=
> ut the parameters of the discussion, or presenting some audio before
> the=0A=
> > discussion).=0A>=0A> There should probably be a separate discussion
> about=
>  if these rules would work equally well for=0A> history/discography and
> tec=
> hnical topics. The way ARSC is today, there needs to be a heavy =0A>
> techni=
> cal=0A> emphasis in the programs, and some technical stuff is a very deep
> d=
> ive and may even take more than=0A> 60 minutes. That said, I thought some
> o=
> f the technical sessions I attended were overly long -- in=0A> other words
> =
> a lot of jargon around very little action or accomplishment. Do you really
> =
> need 35=0A> minutes to tell everyone how you "assess" a grooved record
> (i.e=
> . look at it and see how scratched =0A> up=0A> it is)? On the other hand,
> i=
> f you're laying out a complex database/metadata structure -- which is=0A>
> l=
> ikely to be of great interest to others tasked with that job -- you should
> =
> have the amount of =0A> time=0A> you need to get enough information across
> =
> to be of use to those in attendance, otherwise it's not=0A> worth any
> amoun=
> t of their time, or yours.=0A>=0A> A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for
> =
> historical/discographical presentations might be, if it's=0A> very
> specific=
>  (i.e. one artist's time on one label, one piece of music or one album,
> one=
>  little=0A> record label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something
> sw=
> eeping, like for instance the =0A> history=0A> of jazz in Kansas City,
> that=
>  deserves an hour but make sure the presenter is willing to do the =0A>
> wor=
> k=0A> to fill the hour with interesting material.=0A>=0A> Another
> possibili=
> ty to consider -- if someone is basically re-iterating something published
> =
> in =0A> ARSC=0A> Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral
> thes=
> is), perhaps they should be restricted =0A> to=0A> 35 minutes. If they are
> =
> presenting new, interesting (as deemed by the presentations committee)=0A>
> =
> material, give them more time because that will encourage them to develop
> e=
> nough material for a =0A> good=0A> ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous
> c=
> ycle.=0A>=0A> Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if
> shor=
> t time slots lead to shallow, useless=0A> presentations. Very few things
> ca=
> n be well-explained in 20 minutes. A few things need more than 35=0A>
> minut=
> es, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt to
> longti=
> me members." It=0A> should only go long if it's worth the extra time,
> possi=
> bly at the expense of someone else's=0A> opportunity to present. Not to be
> =
> given lightly, but should be given when deserved.=0A>=0A> -- Tom Fine=0A>=
> =0A> ----- Original Message ----- =0A> From: "Steve Ramm" <
> [log in to unmask]
> >=0A> To: <[log in to unmask]>=0A> Sent: Saturday, February 23,
> 2013=
>  11:03 PM=0A> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling-
> Y=
> our vote counts=0A>=0A>=0A>> In a message dated 2/23/2013 6:32:07 P.M.
> East=
> ern Standard Time,=0A>> [log in to unmask] writes:=0A>>=0A>> It is not an
> easy=
>  job putting the=0A>> schedule together, and I sometimes wish the Prog
> Chai=
> r would ask some of=0A>> us for advice.=0A>>=0A>>=0A>> I'll remind ALL on
> t=
> he ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get to=0A>> vote in the
> upcomi=
> ng election that the decision is yours. There were be=0A>> candidates for
> S=
> econd Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots going out=0A>> next
> mont=
> h. The winner of that office will be program chair for the 2014 and=0A>>
> 20=
> 15 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to exercise your vote and decide
> who=
> =0A>> would make the better Program Chair. It is that person's job to plan
> =
> and=0A>> schedule and accept (or reject) program papers. (I will remind
> you=
> , of=0A>> course, that without concurrent sessions, there will be 40% less
> =
> papers=0A>> presented. (and it they are 60 vs 35 minutes in length, there
> w=
> ill be 65% less=0A>> papers than there were in 2012.=0A>>=0A>>=0A>> Steve=
> =0A>>=0A>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 11:57:14 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> In that case, I do have it backwards. So then make sure a technical
> program group runs parallel to a
> history/music group as much as possible.
>
> Mike's got a good point also as far as general interest is concerned. Try
> and set it up so the panel
> on minute opera obscura isn't running opposite the panel on minute
> database obscura unless the
> expectation is that 90% of attendees will be elsewhere.
>
> I don't mean to short-shrift the cataloging/database field. It's very
> important as far as the macro
> topic of preservation and successful access by the public is concerned.
> But it's a very specialized
> area, with true experts involved. It therefore is inherently not of
> general interest, espcially to
> the contingent of hobbyist/collectors. The same can be said for the dark
> corners of music and
> discography obscura. All of it definitely as a place in ARSC, of all
> organizations. But at the
> conferences, care should be taken to have running parallel something of
> more general interest.
>
> It's helpful to post the audio and some slides after the conferneces. I
> wish this were done in a
> more timely manner. I'm able to get my companies conferences put to a
> CD-ROM with complete MP3 audio
> (carved from unedited WAV files) and PDF of slides, in a couple of work
> days (16-20 man hours,
> working at a relaxed pace). ARSC has three days, rather than one day, and
> parallel session, so
> reasonably speaking it's more like 40+ man-hours. But sometimes it takes
> nearly a half year for
> audio to show up online. And why so few slides? Providing slides online
> should be a requirement of
> being provided a presentation forum at ARSC. I'm OK with making conference
> content members-only
> access. Let more people pony up the meager membership cost, in fact if
> more people would join, the
> membership cost could be held steady for a long time or go down.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> PS -- I'd also like to see PDF of ALL ISSUES of the ARSC Journal provided
> online for members.
> Perhaps people who must have the printed version should pay a little
> extra? That's how AES works,
> and they have greatly reduced their printing costs.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 11:07 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
>
> Tom -- I think you got it backwards.  We do not want similar sessions
> opposite each other, we need different sessions opposite.  Having two
> discographical/collecting sessions opposite each other is what the
> problem is.  Many in the group don't care about the technical and
> archivist cataloging sessions, and some ONLY care about these and don't
> care about the musical content or ancient performers.
>
> Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
>
> -------- Original Message --------
>
> From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
>
>
> One solution might be to make Thursday all music/discography day and
> Saturday all
> technology/archiving day, with Friday being some sort of mix with a
> longer morning session for ARSC
> business. This could then help people like Steve and myself avoid being
> torn between something of
> curiosity to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a technical
> session that we know we should
> attend to justify the cost of travel (ie it will help our business,
> which funds the travel).
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 9:10 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
>
>
> > Some academics get travel funds only if they participate in a program.
> >
> > I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of many presentations and in
> the concurrent sessions
> > issue. When there is a conflict, I almost always go to the technical
> sessions and deeply resent
> > not being able to attend those relating to recording history. Grrrr!
> >
> > As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as much as I
> can into that time, and to
> > heck with questions. So do others. Lots of bad info floats around
> unchallenged.
> >
> > On the other hand, I generally dislike the zombie panels where old stars
> reminisce. I spend the $
> > 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not entertainment.
> >
> > Steve Smolian
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Tom Fine
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:21 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
> >
> > One man's opinions ...
> >
> > It seemed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a reasonable
> percentage of presentations
> > that were more about "making your bones in academia" than being relevant
> to ARSC members. Very
> > obtuse subject matter, more appropriate for a doctoral thesis
> presentation in some cases. In other
> > cases, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been interesting
> material. So you could cut out
> > some fat and have longer presentations of substance. Number of
> presentations is not a good measure
> > of anything, in my opinion.
> >
> > Maybe this would work -- first-timers get 35 minutes max. Let them prove
> themselves. It's then up
> > to
> > the presentation committee to decide if they are worthy of an invitation
> to present again at a
> > future conference. Maybe let them know this going in, so they make it a
> point to make that a good
> > 35
> > minutes because their reputation is on the line with ARSC. Those who
> have been deemed interesting
> > enough to be invited back should be told that there's a standing
> invitation but the invitation
> > will
> > be re-evaluated each time they present. This encourages people to stay
> on their A game. The
> > returning veterans should be given up to 60 minutes, but should have to
> justify to the committee
> > why
> > they need more than 35 minutes. This will allow them to consider
> carefully if they really do have
> > 60
> > minutes of material or if they could condense it to 35 minutes.
> >
> > 20 minute slots should be eliminated unless they are mini-presentations
> as part of a panel
> > discussion (i.e. setting out the parameters of the discussion, or
> presenting some audio before the
> > discussion).
> >
> > There should probably be a separate discussion about if these rules
> would work equally well for
> > history/discography and technical topics. The way ARSC is today, there
> needs to be a heavy
> > technical
> > emphasis in the programs, and some technical stuff is a very deep dive
> and may even take more than
> > 60 minutes. That said, I thought some of the technical sessions I
> attended were overly long -- in
> > other words a lot of jargon around very little action or accomplishment.
> Do you really need 35
> > minutes to tell everyone how you "assess" a grooved record (i.e. look at
> it and see how scratched
> > up
> > it is)? On the other hand, if you're laying out a complex
> database/metadata structure -- which is
> > likely to be of great interest to others tasked with that job -- you
> should have the amount of
> > time
> > you need to get enough information across to be of use to those in
> attendance, otherwise it's not
> > worth any amount of their time, or yours.
> >
> > A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for historical/discographical
> presentations might be, if it's
> > very specific (i.e. one artist's time on one label, one piece of music
> or one album, one little
> > record label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something sweeping,
> like for instance the
> > history
> > of jazz in Kansas City, that deserves an hour but make sure the
> presenter is willing to do the
> > work
> > to fill the hour with interesting material.
> >
> > Another possibility to consider -- if someone is basically re-iterating
> something published in
> > ARSC
> > Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral thesis), perhaps
> they should be restricted
> > to
> > 35 minutes. If they are presenting new, interesting (as deemed by the
> presentations committee)
> > material, give them more time because that will encourage them to
> develop enough material for a
> > good
> > ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous cycle.
> >
> > Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if short time
> slots lead to shallow, useless
> > presentations. Very few things can be well-explained in 20 minutes. A
> few things need more than 35
> > minutes, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt
> to longtime members." It
> > should only go long if it's worth the extra time, possibly at the
> expense of someone else's
> > opportunity to present. Not to be given lightly, but should be given
> when deserved.
> >
> > -- Tom Fine
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Steve Ramm" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 11:03 PM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
> >
> >
> >> In a message dated 2/23/2013 6:32:07 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> >> [log in to unmask] writes:
> >>
> >> It is not an easy job putting the
> >> schedule together, and I sometimes wish the Prog Chair would ask some of
> >> us for advice.
> >>
> >>
> >> I'll remind ALL on the ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get to
> >> vote in the upcoming election that the decision is yours. There were be
> >> candidates for Second Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots
> going out
> >> next month. The winner of that office will be program chair for the
> 2014 and
> >> 2015 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to exercise your vote and
> decide who
> >> would make the better Program Chair. It is that person's job to plan and
> >> schedule and accept (or reject) program papers. (I will remind you, of
> >> course, that without concurrent sessions, there will be 40% less papers
> >> presented. (and it they are 60 vs 35 minutes in length, there will be
> 65% less
> >> papers than there were in 2012.
> >>
> >>
> >> Steve
> >>
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 17:13:17 +0000
> From:    "Nelson-Strauss, Brenda" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> Just to clarify, we always hire a professional company, and never use the
> h=
> otel personnel (not to imply that hotel AV companies aren't competent, but
> =
> they are required to tack on excessive service charges). Of course we do
> al=
> l we can to vet the company in advance. Sometimes, as in Rochester, the
> ava=
> ilable pool is very small and even companies with excellent references can
> =
> disappoint. The bids from larger professional companies are typically
> twice=
>  the amount of our budget (are you willing to pay $75 more for
> registration=
> ?). So, as with all things concerning the management of a smallish
> conferen=
> ce, it's a bit of a balancing act. We are taking steps to prevent the
> probl=
> ems that occurred in Rochester.
>
> Finally, some issues could be circumvented if we had a larger pool of
> volun=
> teers within ARSC. Typically there is a flurry of interest on the list
> when=
>  something goes wrong, assistance is offered, but then it's difficult to
> ge=
> t people to follow through. Intentions are good, but we all have other
> jobs=
>  - I understand this. =20
>
> ARSC is run by volunteers - and we need more!
>
> Brenda
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:
> ARSCLIST@lists=
> erv.loc.gov] On Behalf Of Doug Pomeroy
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 10:59 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> les=
> sons
>
> Before the conference in Los Angeles, Tim Brooks circulated an excellent
> ad=
> visory for presenters concerning a/v matters.  He urged us all to check
> the=
>  playback of our CDs and visuals with the operator of the equipment the
> nig=
> ht before the scheduled presentation.  I met the person running the
> equipme=
> nt on the night before my talk, we checked the playback level and I gave
> he=
> r my CD and a clear listing of the track numbers.  =15Despite this, there
> w=
> ere problems finding the CD, with the playback level, and with track
> select=
> ion. =20
>
> I am told the hotel supplies these a/v people, and sometimes they are good
> =
> and often not.  But I would vote for spending whatever is necessary to
> hire=
>  a profesional company.
>
> Mike Biel wrote:
>
> >  FINALLY we got the exec board to put some money out to hire pros, but=20
> > even those were not always good.
>
> Doug Pomeroy
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 13:03:15 -0500
> From:    Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> In Rochester, there were decent sounding systems, but inconsistant
> operators. I try to put myself in their shoes (I've worn those =
> moccasins,
> and got a good sound from them, tapdancing in dirt). The smaller/cheaper
> companies can't carry a large staff, so they have people they can call.
> These guys are likely out till three the night before doing PA for a =
> band.
> They walk in to a long day with an unfamiliar, highly critical crowd =
> running
> stuff that may or may not be well documented, consistant in levels, or
> semi-improvised. It should be a rather engaging gig for sound people, =
> given
> the subject matter, so why don't they respond that way? Seeking an =
> answer
> might help with this problem.
>
> One approach could be to rent the equipement and installation locally, =
> but
> ARSC have its own operators. Hands?
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Nelson-Strauss, Brenda
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 12:13 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- =
> reinforcing
> previous lessons
>
> Just to clarify, we always hire a professional company, and never use =
> the
> hotel personnel (not to imply that hotel AV companies aren't competent, =
> but
> they are required to tack on excessive service charges). Of course we do =
> all
> we can to vet the company in advance. Sometimes, as in Rochester, the
> available pool is very small and even companies with excellent =
> references
> can disappoint. The bids from larger professional companies are =
> typically
> twice the amount of our budget (are you willing to pay $75 more for
> registration?). So, as with all things concerning the management of a
> smallish conference, it's a bit of a balancing act. We are taking steps =
> to
> prevent the problems that occurred in Rochester.
>
> Finally, some issues could be circumvented if we had a larger pool of
> volunteers within ARSC. Typically there is a flurry of interest on the =
> list
> when something goes wrong, assistance is offered, but then it's =
> difficult to
> get people to follow through. Intentions are good, but we all have other
> jobs - I understand this. =20
>
> ARSC is run by volunteers - and we need more!
>
> Brenda
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Doug Pomeroy
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 10:59 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> Before the conference in Los Angeles, Tim Brooks circulated an excellent
> advisory for presenters concerning a/v matters.  He urged us all to =
> check
> the playback of our CDs and visuals with the operator of the equipment =
> the
> night before the scheduled presentation.  I met the person running the
> equipment on the night before my talk, we checked the playback level and =
> I
> gave her my CD and a clear listing of the track numbers.  =15Despite =
> this,
> there were problems finding the CD, with the playback level, and with =
> track
> selection. =20
>
> I am told the hotel supplies these a/v people, and sometimes they are =
> good
> and often not.  But I would vote for spending whatever is necessary to =
> hire
> a profesional company.
>
> Mike Biel wrote:
>
> >  FINALLY we got the exec board to put some money out to hire pros, but =
>
> > even those were not always good.
>
> Doug Pomeroy
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 12:35:07 -0600
> From:    Joel Alperson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [GRAYMAIL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Digitizing 10,000+ audio cassettes
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> As I think I've received more than my share of great advice from all of
> you, I'm going to sign off of this email list in about 24 hours.
>
> If we don't exchange any more information in that time, once more I want
> to thank you all for helping me get started on what I know will be a
> very long-term and tedious project.
>
> I've learned a lot and enjoyed corresponding with all of you.
>
> Thanks again,
>
> Joel
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Don Cox
> Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 7:39 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [GRAYMAIL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Digitizing 10,000+ audio cassettes
>
> On 22/02/2013, Richard L. Hess wrote:
>
> > On 2013-02-22 2:51 PM, Paul Stamler wrote:
> >> I'll venture to disagree with Richard's recommendation of Samplitude.
> >> It's an extremely powerful and flexible program, loaded with features
>
> >> that you won't need for this project. I recommend a less fancy=20
> >> program, something like Adobe Audition, which is far more intuitive=20
> >> and has a less-steep learning curve. It won't do a lot of the things=20
> >> that Samplitude can do -- but you won't be doing those things.
> > I see that Audition now easily handles multiple stereo tracks. This is
>
> > good.
> >=20
> > Does Audition handle this in a virtual mode where the changes you make
>
> > on screen are not written to the original file?
> >=20
> > For example, the native way many/most photo editors work (such as the=20
> > normal / classic modes in PhotoShop and Paint.NET) if you merely save=20
> > the file, the changes are written back to the original. Whereas in=20
> > Adobe Lightroom, changes made in the Develop module are saved in the=20
> > database (and the sidecar file if desired) as the default.
> >=20
> > Samplitude works like Lightroom (and has since 1998 when I first=20
> > purchased it (the version I purchased was called Red Roaster back=20
> > then)). Except there is no central database but rather individual=20
> > sidecar files (called Virtual Projects or VIPs). If Audition works=20
> > this way natively and easily, then go for it. Samplitude/Sequoia is=20
> > one of the best-sounding DAWs--and yes even level changes can sound=20
> > differently among DAWs (though probably not important for your=20
> > project--it's most noticeable in high-end classical music). I have not
>
> > put Audition against Samplitude, so this is not a put-down of=20
> > Audition. I do know someone who abandonded ProTools for that very=20
> > reason.
> >=20
> > Cost: Audition $349 http://www.adobe.com/cart.html?marketSegment=3DCOM
> >         Samplitude ProX $499  http://www.magix.com/us/samplitude/
> >         Note, there is a consumer version of Samplitude now on sale=20
> > for $100
> >         http://www.magix.com/us/samplitude-music-studio/detail/
> >=20
> > It looks a lot like the ProX version I use. I do not know what the=20
> > differences are. I SUSPECT (your mileage may vary) that it will do all
>
> > you want. I'm not certain what limiters and equalizers come with it,=20
> > but you're not using those. For $100, it's worth a try to play with=20
> > it. I'll admit to not having used Audition since it was Cool Edit, so=20
> > I cannot say.
> >=20
> > I'm certain Audition would be fine for you. Tom Fine uses it, I think.
> > It's all what you get used to.
> >=20
> There is no need to be nervous of big programs with many features. One
> has only to learn to use the few features that are relevant to the job
> in hand.
>
> There is no law that the user has to master every facet of the software.
>
> Regards
> --
> Don Cox
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> The information in this email is confidential and may be legally
> privileged=
> . It
> is intended solely for the addressee. Access to this email by anyone else
> is
> unauthorized. Any review by others or distribution to others is strictly
> prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient please contact the
> sender=
>  and
> delete all copies. Thank You!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 11:11:49 -0800
> From:    DAVID BURNHAM <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> I think this is a situation where there is no solution that will satisfy
> ev=
> eryone. =A0No matter what is running up agains what, somebody is going to
> b=
> e interested in both presentations and if you eliminate concurrent
> presenta=
> tions, it is going to seriously reduce the number of events and many will
> b=
> e sitting around because they aren't interested in the current subject.
> =A0=
> I don't envy those who have to make these
> decisions.=0A=0Adb=0A=0A=0A=0A>__=
> ______________________________=0A> From: Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]
> >=0A>=
> To: [log in to unmask] =0A>Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013
> 11:07:23 =
> AM=0A>Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your
> vote=
>  counts=0A> =0A>Tom -- I think you got it backwards.=A0 We do not want
> simi=
> lar sessions=0A>opposite each other, we need different sessions opposite.=
> =A0 Having two=0A>discographical/collecting sessions opposite each other
> is=
>  what the=0A>problem is.=A0 Many in the group don't care about the
> technica=
> l and=0A>archivist cataloging sessions, and some ONLY care about these and
> =
> don't=0A>care about the musical content or ancient performers.=A0
> =0A>=0A>M=
> ike Biel=A0 [log in to unmask] =0A>=0A>-------- Original Message --------=
> =0A>=0A>From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>=0A>=0A>=0A>One
> solutio=
> n might be to make Thursday all music/discography day and=0A>Saturday all =
> =0A>technology/archiving day, with Friday being some sort of mix with
> a=0A>=
> longer morning session for ARSC =0A>business. This could then help people
> l=
> ike Steve and myself avoid being=0A>torn between something of
> =0A>curiosity=
>  to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a technical=0A>session that
> =
> we know we should =0A>attend to justify the cost of travel (ie it will
> help=
>  our business,=0A>which funds the travel).=0A>=0A>-- Tom Fine=0A>=0A>-----
> =
> Original Message ----- =0A>From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]
> >=0A>To=
> : <[log in to unmask]>=0A>Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 9:10
> AM=0A=
> >Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your
> vote=0A>c=
> ounts=0A>=0A>=0A>> Some academics get travel funds only if they
> participate=
>  in a program.=0A>>=0A>> I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of
> man=
> y presentations and in the concurrent sessions =0A>> issue. When there is
> a=
>  conflict, I almost always go to the technical sessions and deeply resent =
> =0A>> not being able to attend those relating to recording history. Grrrr!=
> =0A>>=0A>> As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as
> muc=
> h as I can into that time, and to =0A>> heck with questions. So do others.
> =
> Lots of bad info floats around unchallenged.=0A>>=0A>> On the other hand,
> I=
>  generally dislike the zombie panels where old stars reminisce. I spend
> the=
>  $ =0A>> 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not
> enterta=
> inment.=0A>>=0A>> Steve Smolian=0A>>=0A>>=0A>>=0A>>=0A>> -----Original
> Mess=
> age----- =0A>> From: Tom Fine=0A>> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:21 AM=
> =0A>> To: [log in to unmask]>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC
> Confe=
> rence Program scheduling- Your vote counts=0A>>=0A>> One man's opinions
> ...=
> =0A>>=0A>> It seemed to me, observing in Rochester, that there was a
> reason=
> able percentage of presentations=0A>> that were more about "making your
> bon=
> es in academia" than being relevant to ARSC members. Very=0A>> obtuse
> subje=
> ct matter, more appropriate for a doctoral thesis presentation in some
> case=
> s. In other=0A>> cases, ill preparation sabotaged what might have been
> inte=
> resting material. So you could cut out=0A>> some fat and have longer
> presen=
> tations of substance. Number of presentations is not a good measure=0A>>
> of=
>  anything, in my opinion.=0A>>=0A>> Maybe this would work -- first-timers
> g=
> et 35 minutes max. Let them prove themselves. It's then up =0A>> to=0A>>
> th=
> e presentation committee to decide if they are worthy of an invitation to
> p=
> resent again at a=0A>> future conference. Maybe let them know this going
> in=
> , so they make it a point to make that a good =0A>> 35=0A>> minutes
> because=
>  their reputation is on the line with ARSC. Those who have been deemed
> inte=
> resting=0A>> enough to be invited back should be told that there's a
> standi=
> ng invitation but the invitation =0A>> will=0A>> be re-evaluated each time
> =
> they present. This encourages people to stay on their A game. The=0A>>
> retu=
> rning veterans should be given up to 60 minutes, but should have to
> justify=
>  to the committee =0A>> why=0A>> they need more than 35 minutes. This will
> =
> allow them to consider carefully if they really do have =0A>> 60=0A>>
> minut=
> es of material or if they could condense it to 35 minutes.=0A>>=0A>> 20
> min=
> ute slots should be eliminated unless they are mini-presentations as part
> o=
> f a panel=0A>> discussion (i.e. setting out the parameters of the
> discussio=
> n, or presenting some audio before the=0A>> discussion).=0A>>=0A>> There
> sh=
> ould probably be a separate discussion about if these rules would work
> equa=
> lly well for=0A>> history/discography and technical topics. The way ARSC
> is=
>  today, there needs to be a heavy =0A>> technical=0A>> emphasis in the
> prog=
> rams, and some technical stuff is a very deep dive and may even take more
> t=
> han=0A>> 60 minutes. That said, I thought some of the technical sessions I
> =
> attended were overly long -- in=0A>> other words a lot of jargon around
> ver=
> y little action or accomplishment. Do you really need 35=0A>> minutes to
> te=
> ll everyone how you "assess" a grooved record (i.e. look at it and see how
> =
> scratched =0A>> up=0A>> it is)? On the other hand, if you're laying out a
> c=
> omplex database/metadata structure -- which is=0A>> likely to be of great
> i=
> nterest to others tasked with that job -- you should have the amount of
> =0A=
> >> time=0A>> you need to get enough information across to be of use to
> thos=
> e in attendance, otherwise it's not=0A>> worth any amount of their time,
> or=
>  yours.=0A>>=0A>> A somewhat simplistic rule of thumb for
> historical/discog=
> raphical presentations might be, if it's=0A>> very specific (i.e. one
> artis=
> t's time on one label, one piece of music or one album, one little=0A>>
> rec=
> ord label, etc), keep it to 35 minutes. If it's something sweeping, like
> fo=
> r instance the =0A>> history=0A>> of jazz in Kansas City, that deserves an
> =
> hour but make sure the presenter is willing to do the =0A>> work=0A>> to
> fi=
> ll the hour with interesting material.=0A>>=0A>> Another possibility to
> con=
> sider -- if someone is basically re-iterating something published in =0A>>
> =
> ARSC=0A>> Journal or some other printed outlet (like a doctoral thesis),
> pe=
> rhaps they should be restricted =0A>> to=0A>> 35 minutes. If they are
> prese=
> nting new, interesting (as deemed by the presentations committee)=0A>>
> mate=
> rial, give them more time because that will encourage them to develop
> enoug=
> h material for a =0A>> good=0A>> ARSC Journal article, hence a virtuous
> cyc=
> le.=0A>>=0A>> Bottom line -- number of presentations is meaningless if
> shor=
> t time slots lead to shallow, useless=0A>> presentations. Very few things
> c=
> an be well-explained in 20 minutes. A few things need more than 35=0A>>
> min=
> utes, but I think taste and discretion need to trump egos and "debt to
> long=
> time members." It=0A>> should only go long if it's worth the extra time,
> po=
> ssibly at the expense of someone else's=0A>> opportunity to present. Not
> to=
>  be given lightly, but should be given when deserved.=0A>>=0A>> -- Tom
> Fine=
> =0A>>=0A>> ----- Original Message ----- =0A>> From: "Steve Ramm" <Srsells1@
> =
> AOL.COM>=0A>> To: <[log in to unmask]>=0A>> Sent: Saturday,
> February=
>  23, 2013 11:03 PM=0A>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program
> sch=
> eduling- Your vote counts=0A>>=0A>>=0A>>> In a message dated 2/23/2013
> 6:32=
> :07 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,=0A>>> [log in to unmask] writes:=0A>>>=0A>>>
> I=
> t is not an easy job putting the=0A>>> schedule together, and I sometimes
> w=
> ish the Prog Chair would ask some of=0A>>> us for
> advice.=0A>>>=0A>>>=0A>>>=
>  I'll remind ALL on the ARSC list who are paid members - and thus get
> to=0A=
> >>> vote in the upcoming election that the decision is yours. There were
> be=
> =0A>>> candidates for Second Vice President/Program Chair. in the ballots
> g=
> oing out=0A>>> next month. The winner of that office will be program chair
> =
> for the 2014 and=0A>>> 2015 ARSC conferences. So it's up to you to
> exercise=
>  your vote and decide who=0A>>> would make the better Program Chair. It is
> =
> that person's job to plan and=0A>>> schedule and accept (or reject)
> program=
>  papers. (I will remind you, of=0A>>> course, that without concurrent
> sessi=
> ons, there will be 40% less papers=0A>>> presented. (and it they are 60 vs
> =
> 35 minutes in length, there will be 65% less=0A>>> papers than there were
> i=
> n 2012.=0A>>>=0A>>>=0A>>> Steve=0A>>>=0A>>=0A>=0A>=0A>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 14:45:20 -0500
> From:    Kim Peach <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: New York Chapter meeting notices
>
> Dear Bob,
>
> You can send an email to Karen Fishman, the DC Chapter's chair, at
> [log in to unmask]  Send your contact info and she'll add you to their
> email
> list.  The chapter usually meets at the Library of Congress and you can see
> what they've been up to recently on their web page at
> http://www.arsc-audio.org/chapters/wmac.html.
>
> Kind regards,
> Kim
>
> Kimberly Peach
> ARSC Web Editor
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 11:11 PM, Robert Cham <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I'm retired and never was officially an archivist, just a recording
> > engineer who did restoration work in the past.  I'm moving to Virginia,
> a=
> nd
> > wouyld like to attend meetings in DC when time permits.
> >
> > How do I find out about them?
> >
> > Bob Cham
> >
> >
> >
> >  Dear Doug,
> >>
> >> There are several ways to keep in the loop about ARSC's active New York
> >> Chapter.  I believe Dennis Rooney, NY Chapter Chair, can add you to his
> >> group list.  You can contact him at [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >> Other options are:
> >>
> >> 1. Check the list of forthcoming events on the NY Chapter's webpage at
> >> http://www.arsc-audio.org/**chapters/newyorkchapter.html<
> http://www.arsc=
> -audio.org/chapters/newyorkchapter.html>.
> >>  We'll post updates
> >> monthly.
> >>
> >> 2. Check ARSC's homepage under "News and Events":
> >> http://www.arsc-audio.org/**index.php<
> http://www.arsc-audio.org/index.ph=
> p>.
> >>  We try to post an announcement with
> >> details at least a week before the event date.
> >>
> >> 3. Watch for an announcment to be sent out on ARSCList a week before the
> >> event.
> >>
> >> Thanks for inquiring.  The NY Chapter has a great program this season!
> >>  The
> >> next meeting is this Thursday with a presentation by Tom Fine.   Here
> ar=
> e
> >> the details below.
> >>
> >> All the best,
> >> Kim
> >>
> >> Kimberly Peach
> >> ARSC Web Editor
> >>
> >>
> >>  ARSC New York Chapter
> >>
> >> FEBRUARY 2013 Meeting
> >>
> >> 7 P. M. Thursday, 2/21/13
> >> at the CUNY Sonic Arts Center
> >> West 140th Street & Convent Avenue, New York
> >> or enter at 138th Street off Convent Avenue
> >> Shepard Hall (the Gothic building) - Recital Hall (Room 95, Basement
> >> level) An
> >> elevator is located in the center of the building
> >>
> >> TOM FINE and "The Dawn of Digital"
> >>
> >> Tom Fine will summarize his research that led to his ARSC Journal
> articl=
> e,
> >> "The Dawn of Digital Recording," present some additional facts about
> >> "firsts" in the commercial digital recording field, and play some
> exampl=
> es
> >> of early digital recordings. We have now "lived digital" in the
> >> professional recording business for 40+ years. To put that in
> perspectiv=
> e,
> >> that's a greater number of years than from the dawn of electrical disk
> >> recording to stereo Lps. Since the 1970s, much of the early digital
> >> history
> >> has been lost or mythologized (the latest example being wrong "history"
> >> posted at the NARAS P&E Wing's website). The ARSC Journal article and
> th=
> is
> >> multi-media presentation aim to set the record straight, presenting
> >> first-hand accounts, recorded sound examples and discographical
> >> information.
> >>
> >> Tom Fine is a writer, editor and sound engineer based in Brewster NY. He
> >> is
> >> a member of ARSC and the AES. His analog-to-digital transfer business
> >> concentrates on large institutional/archival and private collections.
> Mo=
> st
> >> of the analog audio collection of Poets House, located in Battery Park
> >> City, was transferred by Fine. All of that audio is now available to
> >> patrons in a central, searchable digital multi-media database. Fine most
> >> recently worked on production and wrote booklet copy for the new Mercury
> >> Living Presence CD and Lp box sets to be released this spring from
> >> UMG/Decca Classics.
> >>   [image: page1image15728]
> >>
> >> OUR NEXT PROGRAM WILL BE ON MARCH 28, 2013
> >>
> >> "The Two Garys"
> >>
> >> A joint presentation on
> >> J=FCrgen Grundheber, ("Archivist/Pirate") and tenor Helge Roswaenge
> >>
> >>
> >> by Gary Thalheimer and Gary Galo, respectively
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
> >>
> >> Subway: Take the 1 train to 137th Street City College and walk north to
> >> 140th St. & Broadway, then go east to 140th St. & Convent Avenue. Take
> t=
> he
> >> A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St,
> >> (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue.
> >> and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
> >>
> >> Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West
> =
> of
> >> Convent A venue.)
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts
> degree=
> s
> >> in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their
> progr=
> am
> >> provides an in- depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a
> >> project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with
> >> emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history
> t=
> o
> >> help them compete in a field that today demands an ever- growing and
> >> highly
> >> diverse skill set.
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
> >>
> >> Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!
> >>
> >> To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org
> >>
> >> On Sun, Feb 17, 2013 at 11:09 AM, Doug Pomeroy <[log in to unmask]
> >> >wrote:
> >>
> >>   I used to receive notices of the New York Chapter meetings,
> >>>  but the notices seem to have stopped.
> >>>
> >>>  How does one get reinstated?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>  Doug Pomeroy
> >>>  Audio Restoration & Mastering Services
> >>>  193 Baltic St
> >>>  Brooklyn, NY 11201-6173
> >>>  (718) 855-2650
> >>>  [log in to unmask]
> >>>
> >>>
> >> !DSPAM:639,**5122f37f326382493849676!
> >>
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 14:49:07 -0500
> From:    Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> Having attended, I believe, four ARSC conferences and presented at
> one, I have just a few marginal comments to make.
>
> I think that, unless there is only one presentation going on at a
> time, there will be people who will be frustrated by having to miss
> ones that are of interest because they are in your area(s) of
> specialty or because they are not and you are missing the opportunity
> to widen your horizons. This has been stated already and I do not know
> if it is reasonable to cut back drastically on the number of
> presentations. Still, it doesn't hurt to state the obvious fact that
> you can't be two places at one time. I am making my possibly redundant
> point because I am one of those who come to the conferences because I
> am interested in all aspects of activity that ARSC encompasses. I
> enjoy presentations that are in areas that I am at least moderately
> experienced and qualified, like collecting, history of musical
> figures, trends in the recording industry and cataloging. Also, I
> equally make a point of attending the more technical presentations,
> specifically because my knowledge there is pretty sketchy and I just
> might learn from those much more expert than myself. I understand the
> pull that Tom F. and Steve S. have described between attending
> programs situated in your "power alley" to justify attending for
> professional reasons and sitting in on what sounds cool or might have
> charismatic presenters or guests, but is not related to what you do
> for a living. I do receive some financial support from my employer for
> attending ARSC conferences on some occasions, though not always and
> the amount nowadays does not cover even close to half of my expenses.
> This means that I don't feel a major compulsion to only go to
> presentations approved by them. I would be happiest with fewer events
> so that nothing is happening concurrently with something else, but
> that is only my personal take on things. I can see that a conference
> program that presents a larger menu is more likely to have something
> for everyone, though it does also open the door for those just taking
> a stab at presenting who have little to add to the common knowledge of
> ARSC.
>
> My experience presenting in Seattle (I believe I had half an hour) was
> pretty educational for me and hope at least a little for the audience.
> I echo the pleas that you prepare and run through your presentation as
> many times as you have to (who could disagree?). I was shocked to see
> that, what looked like a few hundred words on the page could take me
> so long to enunciate out loud. I cut and slashed and worked on
> developing a decent rhythm to the way I spoke. As it turned out, I
> read mostly, but also was able to inject comments as they came to mind
> or in response to audiences comments. I don't think I had to do any
> truncation on the fly, but I would have really appreciated 15 or 20
> more minutes, mostly so that there could have been a better Q & A at
> the end.
>
> Regarding the use of visuals. All I can say is that when I announced
> that there was no multi-media component, just monomedia me talking,
> the audience cheered. I have the recording of my presentation that
> documents how little the audience wanted to sit through another
> PowerPoint lecture. I have seen some good slide shows and obviously we
> in ARSC like to listen to things, but I have never liked it when I
> felt that the visual was either there to remind the speaker where he
> was. I don't mind looking at them afterwards if they are printed out,
> but I could do without them while I am trying to listen. As mentioned
> a few times, some presenters put the entire content of their talk,
> sometimes verbatim. This ought to be specifically forbidden by the
> program committee if they are at all interested in assuring a decent
> level of quality.
>
> I have trimmed out some of the previous comments in this thread simply
> to condense things. It is not that I wish to ignore them, since they
> all made pretty good points.
>
> Looking forward to seeing you in KC,
>
> Peter Hirsch
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > In that case, I do have it backwards. So then make sure a technical
> program
> > group runs parallel to a history/music group as much as possible.
> >
> > Mike's got a good point also as far as general interest is concerned. Try
> > and set it up so the panel on minute opera obscura isn't running opposite
> > the panel on minute database obscura unless the expectation is that 90%
> of
> > attendees will be elsewhere.
> >
> > I don't mean to short-shrift the cataloging/database field. It's very
> > important as far as the macro topic of preservation and successful
> access by
> > the public is concerned. But it's a very specialized area, with true
> experts
> > involved. It therefore is inherently not of general interest, espcially
> to
> > the contingent of hobbyist/collectors. The same can be said for the dark
> > corners of music and discography obscura. All of it definitely as a
> place in
> > ARSC, of all organizations. But at the conferences, care should be taken
> to
> > have running parallel something of more general interest.
> >
> > It's helpful to post the audio and some slides after the conferneces. I
> wish
> > this were done in a more timely manner. I'm able to get my companies
> > conferences put to a CD-ROM with complete MP3 audio (carved from unedited
> > WAV files) and PDF of slides, in a couple of work days (16-20 man hours,
> > working at a relaxed pace). ARSC has three days, rather than one day, and
> > parallel session, so reasonably speaking it's more like 40+ man-hours.
> But
> > sometimes it takes nearly a half year for audio to show up online. And
> why
> > so few slides? Providing slides online should be a requirement of being
> > provided a presentation forum at ARSC. I'm OK with making conference
> content
> > members-only access. Let more people pony up the meager membership cost,
> in
> > fact if more people would join, the membership cost could be held steady
> for
> > a long time or go down.
> >
> > -- Tom Fine
> >
> > PS -- I'd also like to see PDF of ALL ISSUES of the ARSC Journal provided
> > online for members. Perhaps people who must have the printed version
> should
> > pay a little extra? That's how AES works, and they have greatly reduced
> > their printing costs.
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 11:07 AM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> counts
> >
> >
> > Tom -- I think you got it backwards.  We do not want similar sessions
> > opposite each other, we need different sessions opposite.  Having two
> > discographical/collecting sessions opposite each other is what the
> > problem is.  Many in the group don't care about the technical and
> > archivist cataloging sessions, and some ONLY care about these and don't
> > care about the musical content or ancient performers.
> >
> > Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
> >
> > -------- Original Message --------
> >
> > From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> >
> >
> > One solution might be to make Thursday all music/discography day and
> > Saturday all
> > technology/archiving day, with Friday being some sort of mix with a
> > longer morning session for ARSC
> > business. This could then help people like Steve and myself avoid being
> > torn between something of
> > curiosity to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a technical
> > session that we know we should
> > attend to justify the cost of travel (ie it will help our business,
> > which funds the travel).
> >
> > -- Tom Fine
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 9:10 AM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> > counts
> >
> >
> >> Some academics get travel funds only if they participate in a program.
> >>
> >> I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of many presentations and in
> >> the concurrent sessions
> >> issue. When there is a conflict, I almost always go to the technical
> >> sessions and deeply resent
> >> not being able to attend those relating to recording history. Grrrr!
> >>
> >> As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as much as I
> can
> >> into that time, and to
> >> heck with questions. So do others. Lots of bad info floats around
> >> unchallenged.
> >>
> >> On the other hand, I generally dislike the zombie panels where old stars
> >> reminisce. I spend the $
> >> 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not
> entertainment.
> >>
> >> Steve Smolian
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 15:00:15 -0500
> From:    Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> Sorry, I did forget one other point.
>
> I know that it is not always possible to find institutions willing to
> provide space, but I do want to second the comments on how unsuited
> hotel facilities are for the sort of presentations that are the meat
> of the ARSC conferences. The Palo Alto conference showed that you can
> house the attendees in a location and even hold committee meetings
> there, but use first the rate lecture halls on the Stanford campus a
> few minutes away. I also do not recall there being a lack of competent
> AV operators, at least not at the sessions I attended.
>
> I realize that I must know just a small slice of what goes into
> managing a conference, putting together the program and all the local
> arrangements, so I mean no disrespect to any of those who have chosen
> to put the conferences on in hotel facilities. I just think this is
> one of the issues that are worth airing at this point in time when we
> seem to have a groundswell of sentiment for making some changes.
>
> My best,
>
> Peter Hirsch
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2013 at 2:49 PM, Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > Having attended, I believe, four ARSC conferences and presented at
> > one, I have just a few marginal comments to make.
> >
> > I think that, unless there is only one presentation going on at a
> > time, there will be people who will be frustrated by having to miss
> > ones that are of interest because they are in your area(s) of
> > specialty or because they are not and you are missing the opportunity
> > to widen your horizons. This has been stated already and I do not know
> > if it is reasonable to cut back drastically on the number of
> > presentations. Still, it doesn't hurt to state the obvious fact that
> > you can't be two places at one time. I am making my possibly redundant
> > point because I am one of those who come to the conferences because I
> > am interested in all aspects of activity that ARSC encompasses. I
> > enjoy presentations that are in areas that I am at least moderately
> > experienced and qualified, like collecting, history of musical
> > figures, trends in the recording industry and cataloging. Also, I
> > equally make a point of attending the more technical presentations,
> > specifically because my knowledge there is pretty sketchy and I just
> > might learn from those much more expert than myself. I understand the
> > pull that Tom F. and Steve S. have described between attending
> > programs situated in your "power alley" to justify attending for
> > professional reasons and sitting in on what sounds cool or might have
> > charismatic presenters or guests, but is not related to what you do
> > for a living. I do receive some financial support from my employer for
> > attending ARSC conferences on some occasions, though not always and
> > the amount nowadays does not cover even close to half of my expenses.
> > This means that I don't feel a major compulsion to only go to
> > presentations approved by them. I would be happiest with fewer events
> > so that nothing is happening concurrently with something else, but
> > that is only my personal take on things. I can see that a conference
> > program that presents a larger menu is more likely to have something
> > for everyone, though it does also open the door for those just taking
> > a stab at presenting who have little to add to the common knowledge of
> > ARSC.
> >
> > My experience presenting in Seattle (I believe I had half an hour) was
> > pretty educational for me and hope at least a little for the audience.
> > I echo the pleas that you prepare and run through your presentation as
> > many times as you have to (who could disagree?). I was shocked to see
> > that, what looked like a few hundred words on the page could take me
> > so long to enunciate out loud. I cut and slashed and worked on
> > developing a decent rhythm to the way I spoke. As it turned out, I
> > read mostly, but also was able to inject comments as they came to mind
> > or in response to audiences comments. I don't think I had to do any
> > truncation on the fly, but I would have really appreciated 15 or 20
> > more minutes, mostly so that there could have been a better Q & A at
> > the end.
> >
> > Regarding the use of visuals. All I can say is that when I announced
> > that there was no multi-media component, just monomedia me talking,
> > the audience cheered. I have the recording of my presentation that
> > documents how little the audience wanted to sit through another
> > PowerPoint lecture. I have seen some good slide shows and obviously we
> > in ARSC like to listen to things, but I have never liked it when I
> > felt that the visual was either there to remind the speaker where he
> > was. I don't mind looking at them afterwards if they are printed out,
> > but I could do without them while I am trying to listen. As mentioned
> > a few times, some presenters put the entire content of their talk,
> > sometimes verbatim. This ought to be specifically forbidden by the
> > program committee if they are at all interested in assuring a decent
> > level of quality.
> >
> > I have trimmed out some of the previous comments in this thread simply
> > to condense things. It is not that I wish to ignore them, since they
> > all made pretty good points.
> >
> > Looking forward to seeing you in KC,
> >
> > Peter Hirsch
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 15:12:21 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: New York Chapter meeting notices
>
> Hi Kim:
>
> Instead of keeping PDF of meeting notices on the website, could you post
> PDF of the presentation
> slides? I for one am happy to provide a PDF. Also audio recordings, when
> they're made? There are
> some great topics covered in the chapters. Members-only access would be
> fine with me, another
> incentive to get people to join.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Kim Peach" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 2:45 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] New York Chapter meeting notices
>
>
> Dear Bob,
>
> You can send an email to Karen Fishman, the DC Chapter's chair, at
> [log in to unmask]  Send your contact info and she'll add you to their
> email
> list.  The chapter usually meets at the Library of Congress and you can see
> what they've been up to recently on their web page at
> http://www.arsc-audio.org/chapters/wmac.html.
>
> Kind regards,
> Kim
>
> Kimberly Peach
> ARSC Web Editor
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 11:11 PM, Robert Cham <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I'm retired and never was officially an archivist, just a recording
> > engineer who did restoration work in the past.  I'm moving to Virginia,
> and
> > wouyld like to attend meetings in DC when time permits.
> >
> > How do I find out about them?
> >
> > Bob Cham
> >
> >
> >
> >  Dear Doug,
> >>
> >> There are several ways to keep in the loop about ARSC's active New York
> >> Chapter.  I believe Dennis Rooney, NY Chapter Chair, can add you to his
> >> group list.  You can contact him at [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >> Other options are:
> >>
> >> 1. Check the list of forthcoming events on the NY Chapter's webpage at
> >> http://www.arsc-audio.org/**chapters/newyorkchapter.html<
> http://www.arsc-audio.org/chapters/newyorkchapter.html>.
> >>  We'll post updates
> >> monthly.
> >>
> >> 2. Check ARSC's homepage under "News and Events":
> >> http://www.arsc-audio.org/**index.php<
> http://www.arsc-audio.org/index.php>.
> >>  We try to post an announcement with
> >> details at least a week before the event date.
> >>
> >> 3. Watch for an announcment to be sent out on ARSCList a week before the
> >> event.
> >>
> >> Thanks for inquiring.  The NY Chapter has a great program this season!
> >>  The
> >> next meeting is this Thursday with a presentation by Tom Fine.   Here
> are
> >> the details below.
> >>
> >> All the best,
> >> Kim
> >>
> >> Kimberly Peach
> >> ARSC Web Editor
> >>
> >>
> >>  ARSC New York Chapter
> >>
> >> FEBRUARY 2013 Meeting
> >>
> >> 7 P. M. Thursday, 2/21/13
> >> at the CUNY Sonic Arts Center
> >> West 140th Street & Convent Avenue, New York
> >> or enter at 138th Street off Convent Avenue
> >> Shepard Hall (the Gothic building) - Recital Hall (Room 95, Basement
> >> level) An
> >> elevator is located in the center of the building
> >>
> >> TOM FINE and "The Dawn of Digital"
> >>
> >> Tom Fine will summarize his research that led to his ARSC Journal
> article,
> >> "The Dawn of Digital Recording," present some additional facts about
> >> "firsts" in the commercial digital recording field, and play some
> examples
> >> of early digital recordings. We have now "lived digital" in the
> >> professional recording business for 40+ years. To put that in
> perspective,
> >> that's a greater number of years than from the dawn of electrical disk
> >> recording to stereo Lps. Since the 1970s, much of the early digital
> >> history
> >> has been lost or mythologized (the latest example being wrong "history"
> >> posted at the NARAS P&E Wing's website). The ARSC Journal article and
> this
> >> multi-media presentation aim to set the record straight, presenting
> >> first-hand accounts, recorded sound examples and discographical
> >> information.
> >>
> >> Tom Fine is a writer, editor and sound engineer based in Brewster NY. He
> >> is
> >> a member of ARSC and the AES. His analog-to-digital transfer business
> >> concentrates on large institutional/archival and private collections.
> Most
> >> of the analog audio collection of Poets House, located in Battery Park
> >> City, was transferred by Fine. All of that audio is now available to
> >> patrons in a central, searchable digital multi-media database. Fine most
> >> recently worked on production and wrote booklet copy for the new Mercury
> >> Living Presence CD and Lp box sets to be released this spring from
> >> UMG/Decca Classics.
> >>   [image: page1image15728]
> >>
> >> OUR NEXT PROGRAM WILL BE ON MARCH 28, 2013
> >>
> >> "The Two Garys"
> >>
> >> A joint presentation on
> >> Jürgen Grundheber, ("Archivist/Pirate") and tenor Helge Roswaenge
> >>
> >>
> >> by Gary Thalheimer and Gary Galo, respectively
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> DIRECTIONS TO THE SONIC ARTS CENTER
> >>
> >> Subway: Take the 1 train to 137th Street City College and walk north to
> >> 140th St. & Broadway, then go east to 140th St. & Convent Avenue. Take
> the
> >> A, B, C, or D trains to 145th St, go south on St. Nicholas to 141st St,
> >> (one long block), then west one block to Convent Avenue.
> >> and south one more block to 140th & Convent Avenue.
> >>
> >> Bus: M4 and M5 on Broadway; M 100, 101 on Amsterdam Ave (one block West
> of
> >> Convent A venue.)
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> The Sonic Arts Center at CCNY offers 4-year Bachelor of Fine Arts
> degrees
> >> in Music with a concentration in Music and Audio Technology. Their
> program
> >> provides an in- depth curriculum emphasizing real-world skills with a
> >> project-based approach. Students enjoy a well-rounded program, with
> >> emphasis on audio technology, music theory, orchestration, and history
> to
> >> help them compete in a field that today demands an ever- growing and
> >> highly
> >> diverse skill set.
> >>
> >> v?v?v?
> >>
> >>
> >> All ARSC NY Chapter meetings are free and open to the public.
> >>
> >> Voluntary contributions to help defray our expenses are welcome!
> >>
> >> To join ARSC, visit http://www.arsc-audio.org
> >>
> >> On Sun, Feb 17, 2013 at 11:09 AM, Doug Pomeroy <[log in to unmask]
> >> >wrote:
> >>
> >>   I used to receive notices of the New York Chapter meetings,
> >>>  but the notices seem to have stopped.
> >>>
> >>>  How does one get reinstated?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>  Doug Pomeroy
> >>>  Audio Restoration & Mastering Services
> >>>  193 Baltic St
> >>>  Brooklyn, NY 11201-6173
> >>>  (718) 855-2650
> >>>  [log in to unmask]
> >>>
> >>>
> >> !DSPAM:639,**5122f37f326382493849676!
> >>
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 20:28:38 +0000
> From:    "Gordon, Bruce" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> Not to rain on your institutional parade but I presented in Palo Alto. My
> m=
> ost vivd memory was having to deliver my boss's presentation in her stead
> a=
> nd having to do it without benefit of a microphone and PA system. There
> was=
>  a PA system--just no microphone. Otherwise it was a great conference and
> a=
>  great location. It's all in the planning, and once you are there it is
> all=
>  in the stars and the putting-out of fires.
>
> Best,
>
> -Bruce
>
> Bruce J. Gordon
> Audio Engineer
> Audio Preservation Services
> Harvard University
> Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
> U.S.A
> tel. +1(617) 495-1241
> fax +1(617) 496-4636
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 24, 2013, at 3:00 PM, Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]>
>  wrote:
>
> > Sorry, I did forget one other point.
> >=20
> > I know that it is not always possible to find institutions willing to
> > provide space, but I do want to second the comments on how unsuited
> > hotel facilities are for the sort of presentations that are the meat
> > of the ARSC conferences. The Palo Alto conference showed that you can
> > house the attendees in a location and even hold committee meetings
> > there, but use first the rate lecture halls on the Stanford campus a
> > few minutes away. I also do not recall there being a lack of competent
> > AV operators, at least not at the sessions I attended.
> >=20
> > I realize that I must know just a small slice of what goes into
> > managing a conference, putting together the program and all the local
> > arrangements, so I mean no disrespect to any of those who have chosen
> > to put the conferences on in hotel facilities. I just think this is
> > one of the issues that are worth airing at this point in time when we
> > seem to have a groundswell of sentiment for making some changes.
> >=20
> > My best,
> >=20
> > Peter Hirsch
> >=20
> > On Sun, Feb 24, 2013 at 2:49 PM, Peter Hirsch <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >> Having attended, I believe, four ARSC conferences and presented at
> >> one, I have just a few marginal comments to make.
> >>=20
> >> I think that, unless there is only one presentation going on at a
> >> time, there will be people who will be frustrated by having to miss
> >> ones that are of interest because they are in your area(s) of
> >> specialty or because they are not and you are missing the opportunity
> >> to widen your horizons. This has been stated already and I do not know
> >> if it is reasonable to cut back drastically on the number of
> >> presentations. Still, it doesn't hurt to state the obvious fact that
> >> you can't be two places at one time. I am making my possibly redundant
> >> point because I am one of those who come to the conferences because I
> >> am interested in all aspects of activity that ARSC encompasses. I
> >> enjoy presentations that are in areas that I am at least moderately
> >> experienced and qualified, like collecting, history of musical
> >> figures, trends in the recording industry and cataloging. Also, I
> >> equally make a point of attending the more technical presentations,
> >> specifically because my knowledge there is pretty sketchy and I just
> >> might learn from those much more expert than myself. I understand the
> >> pull that Tom F. and Steve S. have described between attending
> >> programs situated in your "power alley" to justify attending for
> >> professional reasons and sitting in on what sounds cool or might have
> >> charismatic presenters or guests, but is not related to what you do
> >> for a living. I do receive some financial support from my employer for
> >> attending ARSC conferences on some occasions, though not always and
> >> the amount nowadays does not cover even close to half of my expenses.
> >> This means that I don't feel a major compulsion to only go to
> >> presentations approved by them. I would be happiest with fewer events
> >> so that nothing is happening concurrently with something else, but
> >> that is only my personal take on things. I can see that a conference
> >> program that presents a larger menu is more likely to have something
> >> for everyone, though it does also open the door for those just taking
> >> a stab at presenting who have little to add to the common knowledge of
> >> ARSC.
> >>=20
> >> My experience presenting in Seattle (I believe I had half an hour) was
> >> pretty educational for me and hope at least a little for the audience.
> >> I echo the pleas that you prepare and run through your presentation as
> >> many times as you have to (who could disagree?). I was shocked to see
> >> that, what looked like a few hundred words on the page could take me
> >> so long to enunciate out loud. I cut and slashed and worked on
> >> developing a decent rhythm to the way I spoke. As it turned out, I
> >> read mostly, but also was able to inject comments as they came to mind
> >> or in response to audiences comments. I don't think I had to do any
> >> truncation on the fly, but I would have really appreciated 15 or 20
> >> more minutes, mostly so that there could have been a better Q & A at
> >> the end.
> >>=20
> >> Regarding the use of visuals. All I can say is that when I announced
> >> that there was no multi-media component, just monomedia me talking,
> >> the audience cheered. I have the recording of my presentation that
> >> documents how little the audience wanted to sit through another
> >> PowerPoint lecture. I have seen some good slide shows and obviously we
> >> in ARSC like to listen to things, but I have never liked it when I
> >> felt that the visual was either there to remind the speaker where he
> >> was. I don't mind looking at them afterwards if they are printed out,
> >> but I could do without them while I am trying to listen. As mentioned
> >> a few times, some presenters put the entire content of their talk,
> >> sometimes verbatim. This ought to be specifically forbidden by the
> >> program committee if they are at all interested in assuring a decent
> >> level of quality.
> >>=20
> >> I have trimmed out some of the previous comments in this thread simply
> >> to condense things. It is not that I wish to ignore them, since they
> >> all made pretty good points.
> >>=20
> >> Looking forward to seeing you in KC,
> >>=20
> >> Peter Hirsch
> >>=20
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 15:50:44 -0500
> From:    Frank Strauss <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> > One approach could be to rent the equipement and installation locally,
> but
> > ARSC have its own operators. Hands?
> >
> > I have been the AV boy for a local Rotary Club for many years, from back
> in the days of the Kodak Carousel, and I sometimes wish for the return of
> the Carousel, when the worst emergency was a blown bulb or a slide that
> wouldn't drop.  One of the most stressful situations you can have is when
> the speaker shows up, often a little late, and his/her laptop doesn't like
> our projector/sound system, or the speaker brings his/her presentation on
> non/semi compatible media.  MS has planted enough little time bombs in the
> different versions of Windows and PP, so that the 5 minutes before the
> presentation can be excruciating.  The worst case scenario is when the
> speaker shows up with a MAC, and doesn't realize we have a VGA projector,
> even though that information was sent to him/her prior to the meeting. They
> assume we have a converter/adapter and we assume they have done it before,
> and have the necessary equipment. There is no substitute for operator
> expertise and experience.  Also, a very valid point was raised about what
> is on your PP slide.  Way too many people put a slide up and then read it
> word for word. Another annoyance is the use of random slide transitions.
> Just because they are there, you don't need to use them. Maybe a good
> subject for a presentation at an ARSC convention would be how to put a
> presentation together, including how to make things work in the 5 minutes
> before show time.
>
>
> --
> Frank B Strauss, DMD
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 16:24:10 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> RCA Red Seal (classical front-line label) pressed its first digital record
> -- Ormandy/Philly Bartok
> Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl. Does anyone know for sure if they
> did any other first-issue
> digitals on red vinyl?
>
> Pablo also did their first series of digital records on red vinyl. I
> suspect RCA was doing the
> pressing, although by that time Pablo was saying "Manufactured by Pablo
> Records" on their LPs. The
> early Pablo records said on the label that they were manufactured by RCA.
> I suspect that Norman
> Granz got that changed once the label got established, but probably kept
> RCA doing the pressing
> until Pablo was bought by Fantasy Group.
>
> Anyway, was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in that time period --
> 1978-1980?
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 17:27:15 -0500
> From:    Steve Smolian <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> Many hotels have strict union rules forbidding this.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Frank Strauss
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 3:50 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing
> previous lessons
>
> > One approach could be to rent the equipement and installation locally,
> but
> > ARSC have its own operators. Hands?
> >
> > I have been the AV boy for a local Rotary Club for many years, from back
> in the days of the Kodak Carousel, and I sometimes wish for the return of
> the Carousel, when the worst emergency was a blown bulb or a slide that
> wouldn't drop.  One of the most stressful situations you can have is when
> the speaker shows up, often a little late, and his/her laptop doesn't like
> our projector/sound system, or the speaker brings his/her presentation on
> non/semi compatible media.  MS has planted enough little time bombs in the
> different versions of Windows and PP, so that the 5 minutes before the
> presentation can be excruciating.  The worst case scenario is when the
> speaker shows up with a MAC, and doesn't realize we have a VGA projector,
> even though that information was sent to him/her prior to the meeting. They
> assume we have a converter/adapter and we assume they have done it before,
> and have the necessary equipment. There is no substitute for operator
> expertise and experience.  Also, a very valid point was raised about what
> is on your PP slide.  Way too many people put a slide up and then read it
> word for word. Another annoyance is the use of random slide transitions.
> Just because they are there, you don't need to use them. Maybe a good
> subject for a presentation at an ARSC convention would be how to put a
> presentation together, including how to make things work in the 5 minutes
> before show time.
>
>
> --
> Frank B Strauss, DMD
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 15:41:07 -0700
> From:    Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> I have never seen a first pressing on red vinyl=2Conly the later issues on
> =
> black vinyl.It was a special thing=2Cbut no other label did it that I know
> =
> of. I do know that I have the first Deutsche Gramophon digital record.It
> wa=
> s a Mozart opera by von Karajan=2CZauberflote I think.It came with a
> specia=
> l bonus record=2Ca 12" 45 RPM single of HVK's first recording for Deutsche
> =
> Grammophon=2Canother Mozart overture=2Cbut I forget which one off hand.
> Tho=
> se late digital vinyl issues for classical=2Ccirca 1989-92=2Cgo for
> serious=
>  money nowadays. Did Columbia do anything special for their first digital
> r=
> ecord? I don't think Philips and Decca/London did. I have a few British
> Dec=
> ca rock records=2Canalogue=2Cfrom 1980-81=2Cand they were still pressed in
> =
> England=2Cunlike the digital classical titles that were pressed in Holland
> =
> by Polygram.But British Decca also pressed the first few digital London
> tit=
> les=2Cso they clearly could do it.It is kind of confusing. Roger > Date:
> Su=
> n=2C 24 Feb 2013 16:24:10 -0500> From: [log in to unmask]>
> Subject=
> : [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital> To: [log in to unmask]> >
> RC=
> A Red Seal (classical front-line label) pressed its first digital record
> --=
>  Ormandy/Philly Bartok > Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl. Does
> anyon=
> e know for sure if they did any other first-issue > digitals on red
> vinyl?>=
>  > Pablo also did their first series of digital records on red vinyl. I
> sus=
> pect RCA was doing the > pressing=2C although by that time Pablo was
> saying=
>  "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The > early Pablo records
> sa=
> id on the label that they were manufactured by RCA. I suspect that Norman
> >=
>  Granz got that changed once the label got established=2C but probably
> kept=
>  RCA doing the pressing > until Pablo was bought by Fantasy Group.> >
> Anywa=
> y=2C was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in that time period --
> 1978-=
> 1980?> > -- Tom Fine                                      =
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 16:37:47 -0600
> From:    "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> Tech rehearsals may be the answer. When to do them, that's the real
> question.
>
> joe salerno
>
> On 2/24/2013 12:03 PM, Carl Pultz wrote:
> > In Rochester, there were decent sounding systems, but inconsistant
> > operators. I try to put myself in their shoes (I've worn those moccasins,
> > and got a good sound from them, tapdancing in dirt). The smaller/cheaper
> > companies can't carry a large staff, so they have people they can call.
> > These guys are likely out till three the night before doing PA for a
> band.
> > They walk in to a long day with an unfamiliar, highly critical crowd
> running
> > stuff that may or may not be well documented, consistant in levels, or
> > semi-improvised. It should be a rather engaging gig for sound people,
> given
> > the subject matter, so why don't they respond that way? Seeking an answer
> > might help with this problem.
> >
> > One approach could be to rent the equipement and installation locally,
> but
> > ARSC have its own operators. Hands?
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> > [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Nelson-Strauss, Brenda
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 12:13 PM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing
> > previous lessons
> >
> > Just to clarify, we always hire a professional company, and never use the
> > hotel personnel (not to imply that hotel AV companies aren't competent,
> but
> > they are required to tack on excessive service charges). Of course we do
> all
> > we can to vet the company in advance. Sometimes, as in Rochester, the
> > available pool is very small and even companies with excellent references
> > can disappoint. The bids from larger professional companies are typically
> > twice the amount of our budget (are you willing to pay $75 more for
> > registration?). So, as with all things concerning the management of a
> > smallish conference, it's a bit of a balancing act. We are taking steps
> to
> > prevent the problems that occurred in Rochester.
> >
> > Finally, some issues could be circumvented if we had a larger pool of
> > volunteers within ARSC. Typically there is a flurry of interest on the
> list
> > when something goes wrong, assistance is offered, but then it's
> difficult to
> > get people to follow through. Intentions are good, but we all have other
> > jobs - I understand this.
> >
> > ARSC is run by volunteers - and we need more!
> >
> > Brenda
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> > [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Doug Pomeroy
> > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 10:59 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> > lessons
> >
> > Before the conference in Los Angeles, Tim Brooks circulated an excellent
> > advisory for presenters concerning a/v matters.  He urged us all to check
> > the playback of our CDs and visuals with the operator of the equipment
> the
> > night before the scheduled presentation.  I met the person running the
> > equipment on the night before my talk, we checked the playback level and
> I
> > gave her my CD and a clear listing of the track numbers.   Despite this,
> > there were problems finding the CD, with the playback level, and with
> track
> > selection.
> >
> > I am told the hotel supplies these a/v people, and sometimes they are
> good
> > and often not.  But I would vote for spending whatever is necessary to
> hire
> > a profesional company.
> >
> > Mike Biel wrote:
> >
> >>   FINALLY we got the exec board to put some money out to hire pros, but
> >> even those were not always good.
> >
> > Doug Pomeroy
> > [log in to unmask]
> >
>
> --
> Joe Salerno
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 18:20:11 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> Incorrect about DGG. The first digital record, as stated on their own
> website a few years ago (I
> think they took down that nice history/timeline they used to have), is
> Kremer, violin / Maazel /
> Berlin Philharmonic - Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. DGG used the 3M system
> in their early days (I
> finally found a British pro-audio magazine article confirming this).
>
> DGG was late to the party, but Philips was last. I incorrectly stated
> Philips' first digital
> recording in my ARSC Journal article, and the answer was hiding in plain
> sight! The first Philips
> digital record was "Pops In Space!" by John Williams and the Boston Pops.
> It was recorded on the
> Soundstream system and a Decca engineering crew handled the job. I don't
> think any other Philips
> records were made using the Soundstream system, and no Decca records that
> I know of were made with
> Soundstream. Decca had their own digital recorder by that time, but may
> not have had a machine
> available for Boston on the date of the session. Or, Philips may have
> opted for Soundstream in any
> case.
>
> When I did my ARSC-NYC presentation on Thursday, one of the highlights for
> me was being able to
> discuss Soundstream and RCA's extensive use of it with Jon Samuels, who
> had first-hand knowledge. I
> wish Jon would do a presentation summarizing RCA's entry into digital, and
> take it up through how
> they did the first Living Stereo reissues and then how the subsequent
> Living Stereo SACD's were
> done. The whole topic is interesting and I give RCA and BMG a lot of
> credit for experimenting with
> many different systems and methods.
>
> Regarding the Ormandy red LP, just buy a copy on eBay. They are plentiful.
> Pablo red LPs are also
> plentiful and non-valuable as collectables.
>
> I should submit and addendum to the ARSC Journal because I did uncover a
> few new facts and got
> corrections for two factual errors in my article. That said, it's a
> somewhat obscure topic. Final
> salient fact -- the music business has been digital more than half the
> timespan since the LP
> debuted.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Roger Kulp" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 5:41 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital
>
>
> I have never seen a first pressing on red vinyl,only the later issues on
> black vinyl.It was a
> special thing,but no other label did it that I know of. I do know that I
> have the first Deutsche
> Gramophon digital record.It was a Mozart opera by von Karajan,Zauberflote
> I think.It came with a
> special bonus record,a 12" 45 RPM single of HVK's first recording for
> Deutsche Grammophon,another
> Mozart overture,but I forget which one off hand. Those late digital vinyl
> issues for classical,circa
> 1989-92,go for serious money nowadays. Did Columbia do anything special
> for their first digital
> record? I don't think Philips and Decca/London did. I have a few British
> Decca rock
> records,analogue,from 1980-81,and they were still pressed in
> England,unlike the digital classical
> titles that were pressed in Holland by Polygram.But British Decca also
> pressed the first few digital
> London titles,so they clearly could do it.It is kind of confusing. Roger >
> Date: Sun, 24 Feb 2013
> 16:24:10 -0500> From: [log in to unmask]> Subject: [ARSCLIST]
> RCA red vinyl for digital>
> To: [log in to unmask]> > RCA Red Seal (classical front-line
> label) pressed its first digital
> record -- Ormandy/Philly Bartok > Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl.
> Does anyone know for sure
> if they did any other first-issue > digitals on red vinyl?> > Pablo also
> did their first series of
> digital records on red vinyl. I suspect RCA was doing the > pressing,
> although by that time Pablo
> was saying "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The > early Pablo
> records said on the label
> that they were manufactured by RCA. I suspect that Norman > Granz got that
> changed once the label
> got established, but probably kept RCA doing the pressing > until Pablo
> was bought by Fantasy
> Group.> > Anyway, was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in that time
> period -- 1978-1980?> > --
> Tom Fine
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 25 Feb 2013 00:57:19 +0100
> From:    George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote counts
>
> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
> I'm siding with Peter Hirsch, here. Also, although there are aspects of
> association life that I do not agree with Mike Biel on, his views on how a
> conference should be are absolutely spot on. Parallel tracks are an
> abomination, and I would phrase it very simply: you have to be present at
> those presentations where you might disagree with the speaker, and you get
> narrower and narrower in your perspective. A good friend believes that
> multiple tracks were invented in order that academics could get as many
> papers under their belt as possible, irrespective of length. I weep every
> time I have to choose, although if the chairpersons are on their toes and
> the
> technology does not play up, and if the venue has only running distance
> between halls, careful planning will permit me to tailormake a conference
> just for myself. No sitting down, no questions to the speaker, however,
> because it is unending last-in/first out in each hall/lecture room. Thank
> goodness for coffee breaks.
>
> As I get older I am slowly getting to the point where I want to be an
> invited
> speaker so that I can stipulate the time I need in a plenary session, if I
> am
> to speak at all.
>
> Keep up the good criticism,
>
> kind regards,
>
>
> George
>
>
> --------------------------------
>
>
>
> > Having attended, I believe, four ARSC conferences and presented at
> > one, I have just a few marginal comments to make.
> >
> > I think that, unless there is only one presentation going on at a
> > time, there will be people who will be frustrated by having to miss
> > ones that are of interest because they are in your area(s) of
> > specialty or because they are not and you are missing the opportunity
> > to widen your horizons. This has been stated already and I do not know
> > if it is reasonable to cut back drastically on the number of
> > presentations. Still, it doesn't hurt to state the obvious fact that
> > you can't be two places at one time. I am making my possibly redundant
> > point because I am one of those who come to the conferences because I
> > am interested in all aspects of activity that ARSC encompasses. I
> > enjoy presentations that are in areas that I am at least moderately
> > experienced and qualified, like collecting, history of musical
> > figures, trends in the recording industry and cataloging. Also, I
> > equally make a point of attending the more technical presentations,
> > specifically because my knowledge there is pretty sketchy and I just
> > might learn from those much more expert than myself. I understand the
> > pull that Tom F. and Steve S. have described between attending
> > programs situated in your "power alley" to justify attending for
> > professional reasons and sitting in on what sounds cool or might have
> > charismatic presenters or guests, but is not related to what you do
> > for a living. I do receive some financial support from my employer for
> > attending ARSC conferences on some occasions, though not always and
> > the amount nowadays does not cover even close to half of my expenses.
> > This means that I don't feel a major compulsion to only go to
> > presentations approved by them. I would be happiest with fewer events
> > so that nothing is happening concurrently with something else, but
> > that is only my personal take on things. I can see that a conference
> > program that presents a larger menu is more likely to have something
> > for everyone, though it does also open the door for those just taking
> > a stab at presenting who have little to add to the common knowledge of
> > ARSC.
> >
> > My experience presenting in Seattle (I believe I had half an hour) was
> > pretty educational for me and hope at least a little for the audience.
> > I echo the pleas that you prepare and run through your presentation as
> > many times as you have to (who could disagree?). I was shocked to see
> > that, what looked like a few hundred words on the page could take me
> > so long to enunciate out loud. I cut and slashed and worked on
> > developing a decent rhythm to the way I spoke. As it turned out, I
> > read mostly, but also was able to inject comments as they came to mind
> > or in response to audiences comments. I don't think I had to do any
> > truncation on the fly, but I would have really appreciated 15 or 20
> > more minutes, mostly so that there could have been a better Q & A at
> > the end.
> >
> > Regarding the use of visuals. All I can say is that when I announced
> > that there was no multi-media component, just monomedia me talking,
> > the audience cheered. I have the recording of my presentation that
> > documents how little the audience wanted to sit through another
> > PowerPoint lecture. I have seen some good slide shows and obviously we
> > in ARSC like to listen to things, but I have never liked it when I
> > felt that the visual was either there to remind the speaker where he
> > was. I don't mind looking at them afterwards if they are printed out,
> > but I could do without them while I am trying to listen. As mentioned
> > a few times, some presenters put the entire content of their talk,
> > sometimes verbatim. This ought to be specifically forbidden by the
> > program committee if they are at all interested in assuring a decent
> > level of quality.
> >
> > I have trimmed out some of the previous comments in this thread simply
> > to condense things. It is not that I wish to ignore them, since they
> > all made pretty good points.
> >
> > Looking forward to seeing you in KC,
> >
> > Peter Hirsch
> >
> > On Sun, Feb 24, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
> > > In that case, I do have it backwards. So then make sure a technical
> > program
> > > group runs parallel to a history/music group as much as possible.
> > >
> > > Mike's got a good point also as far as general interest is concerned.
> > Try
> > > and set it up so the panel on minute opera obscura isn't running
> > opposite
> > > the panel on minute database obscura unless the expectation is that 90%
> > of
> > > attendees will be elsewhere.
> > >
> > > I don't mean to short-shrift the cataloging/database field. It's very
> > > important as far as the macro topic of preservation and successful
> access
> > by
> > > the public is concerned. But it's a very specialized area, with true
> > experts
> > > involved. It therefore is inherently not of general interest, espcially
> > to
> > > the contingent of hobbyist/collectors. The same can be said for the
> dark
> > > corners of music and discography obscura. All of it definitely as a
> place
> > in
> > > ARSC, of all organizations. But at the conferences, care should be
> taken
> > to
> > > have running parallel something of more general interest.
> > >
> > > It's helpful to post the audio and some slides after the conferneces. I
> > wish
> > > this were done in a more timely manner. I'm able to get my companies
> > > conferences put to a CD-ROM with complete MP3 audio (carved from
> > unedited
> > > WAV files) and PDF of slides, in a couple of work days (16-20 man
> hours,
> > > working at a relaxed pace). ARSC has three days, rather than one day,
> > and
> > > parallel session, so reasonably speaking it's more like 40+ man-hours.
> > But
> > > sometimes it takes nearly a half year for audio to show up online. And
> > why
> > > so few slides? Providing slides online should be a requirement of being
> > > provided a presentation forum at ARSC. I'm OK with making conference
> > content
> > > members-only access. Let more people pony up the meager membership
> cost,
> > in
> > > fact if more people would join, the membership cost could be held
> steady
> > for
> > > a long time or go down.
> > >
> > > -- Tom Fine
> > >
> > > PS -- I'd also like to see PDF of ALL ISSUES of the ARSC Journal
> > provided
> > > online for members. Perhaps people who must have the printed version
> > should
> > > pay a little extra? That's how AES works, and they have greatly reduced
> > > their printing costs.
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
> > > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 11:07 AM
> > > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> > counts
> > >
> > >
> > > Tom -- I think you got it backwards.  We do not want similar sessions
> > > opposite each other, we need different sessions opposite.  Having two
> > > discographical/collecting sessions opposite each other is what the
> > > problem is.  Many in the group don't care about the technical and
> > > archivist cataloging sessions, and some ONLY care about these and don't
> > > care about the musical content or ancient performers.
> > >
> > > Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
> > >
> > > -------- Original Message --------
> > >
> > > From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> > >
> > >
> > > One solution might be to make Thursday all music/discography day and
> > > Saturday all
> > > technology/archiving day, with Friday being some sort of mix with a
> > > longer morning session for ARSC
> > > business. This could then help people like Steve and myself avoid being
> > > torn between something of
> > > curiosity to us (ie something historical or musical) vs a technical
> > > session that we know we should
> > > attend to justify the cost of travel (ie it will help our business,
> > > which funds the travel).
> > >
> > > -- Tom Fine
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Steve Smolian" <[log in to unmask]
> >
> > > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > > Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 9:10 AM
> > > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSC Conference Program scheduling- Your vote
> > > counts
> > >
> > >
> > >> Some academics get travel funds only if they participate in a program.
> > >>
> > >> I agree with Mike both in the too shortness of many presentations and
> > in
> > >> the concurrent sessions
> > >> issue. When there is a conflict, I almost always go to the technical
> > >> sessions and deeply resent
> > >> not being able to attend those relating to recording history. Grrrr!
> > >>
> > >> As an occasional presenter with a 35 minute limit, I cram as much as I
> > can
> > >> into that time, and to
> > >> heck with questions. So do others. Lots of bad info floats around
> > >> unchallenged.
> > >>
> > >> On the other hand, I generally dislike the zombie panels where old
> > stars
> > >> reminisce. I spend the $
> > >> 1,000 it costs to travel and register for information, not
> > entertainment.
> > >>
> > >> Steve Smolian
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 18:10:35 -0700
> From:    Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> =0A=0A=0A-------- Original Message --------=0ASubject: [ARSCLIST] RCA red
> v=
> inyl for digital=0AFrom: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>=0ADate:
> Sun=
> , February 24, 2013 4:24 pm=0ATo: [log in to unmask]> RCA
> Red =
> Seal (classical front-line label) pressed its first digital=0A> record --
> O=
> rmandy/Philly Bartok Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl.=0A> Does
> anyon=
> e know for sure if they did any other first-issue digitals=0A> on red
> vinyl=
> ? Anyway, was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in=0A> that time
> period=
>  -- 1978-1980?   -- Tom Fine=0A=0AThis was a prime time for novelty
> pressin=
> gs of all colors, shapes, etc.=0ARCA did the Ormandy/David Bowie "Peter
> and=
>  the Wolf" on green vinyl --=0Athe green with that particular red label
> was=
>  a rather ugly combination. =0AOnce on ebay I saw a listing for a black
> vin=
> yl copy, which the dealer=0Areminded us was a "common black copy" not a
> "ra=
> re green copy"!  I've=0Anever seen anything but green copies and there
> were=
>  about ten green=0Acopies on ebay at that moment!  Quickly buying that
> inex=
> pensive black=0Acopy I realized immediately when I got it that it was not
> r=
> eally=0A"black", it actually is a very dark brown that is slightly
> transluc=
> ent=0Awhen held up to the light.  This is a very high grade premium vinyl,
> =
> and=0AI think a lot of RCA Red Seals from those final LP years were on
> this=
> =0Avinyl.=0A=0AOf course we all remember the Elvis "Moody Blue" blue
> pressi=
> ngs.  Only=0Athe first half million or something like that were to be
> blue.=
>   They=0APLANNED to switch to black, which they did a week or two before
> he=
>  died.=0A The morning after he died I was in Sounds Good in Chicago where
> o=
> ur pal=0ARich Markow was a buyer.  He was unpacking a shipment which
> includ=
> ed the=0Afirst black copies of Moody Blue we had seen. He had ordered them
> =
> a few=0Adays ago when he ran out. "Damn, now I have to find a blue copy."
>  =
> Well,=0Ait turns out that RCA double-crossed us and resumed pressing in
> blu=
> e! =0AIt was those black copies I had in my hands but didn't want that
> ende=
> d=0Aup being the rare ones.  I finally found a black copy about 5 years
> ago=
> =0Aat a flea market dealer who had all his Elvis records marked at 50%
> off.=
> =0A Great!  After I bought it I called up Leah and just said "Moody
> black!"=
> =0A She knew what I meant.    =0A=0A> Pablo also did their first series of
> =
> digital records on red vinyl.=0A> I suspect RCA was doing the pressing,
> alt=
> hough by that time Pablo=0A> was saying "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on
> =
> their LPs. The early=0A> Pablo records said on the label that they were
> man=
> ufactured by RCA.=0A> I suspect that Norman Granz got that changed once
> the=
>  label got=0A> established, but probably kept RCA doing the pressing until
> =
> Pablo=0A> was bought by Fantasy Group.=0A=0A"Manufactured" does not always
> =
> mean factory pressing.  If you look at=0AHarry Belefonte RCA Victor LPs
> you=
>  see that they are manufactured by=0ABelefonte Enterprises, or something
> li=
> ke that.=0A=0AMike Biel   [log in to unmask]  =0A=0A=0A=0A
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 20:26:39 -0500
> From:    Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> Mike, once again your posting is educational! I bought one of those green
> Bowie/Ormandy records
> right away. Another one I didn't know about. Agree it's an ugly color
> combo. David Bowie and Eugene
> Ormandy might be an ugly combo as well!
>
> Here's a colored vinyl question -- the Crystal Clear D2D album by Laurindo
> Almeida, "Virtuoso
> Guitar." Was it ever NOT pressed as a 45RPM white-vinyl record? I've found
> several copies over the
> years and all of them are somewhat noisy. It must not have been very good
> white vinyl.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:10 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital
>
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital
> From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Sun, February 24, 2013 4:24 pm
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> > RCA Red Seal (classical front-line label) pressed its first digital
> > record -- Ormandy/Philly Bartok Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl.
> > Does anyone know for sure if they did any other first-issue digitals
> > on red vinyl? Anyway, was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in
> > that time period -- 1978-1980?   -- Tom Fine
>
> This was a prime time for novelty pressings of all colors, shapes, etc.
> RCA did the Ormandy/David Bowie "Peter and the Wolf" on green vinyl --
> the green with that particular red label was a rather ugly combination.
> Once on ebay I saw a listing for a black vinyl copy, which the dealer
> reminded us was a "common black copy" not a "rare green copy"!  I've
> never seen anything but green copies and there were about ten green
> copies on ebay at that moment!  Quickly buying that inexpensive black
> copy I realized immediately when I got it that it was not really
> "black", it actually is a very dark brown that is slightly translucent
> when held up to the light.  This is a very high grade premium vinyl, and
> I think a lot of RCA Red Seals from those final LP years were on this
> vinyl.
>
> Of course we all remember the Elvis "Moody Blue" blue pressings.  Only
> the first half million or something like that were to be blue.  They
> PLANNED to switch to black, which they did a week or two before he died.
>  The morning after he died I was in Sounds Good in Chicago where our pal
> Rich Markow was a buyer.  He was unpacking a shipment which included the
> first black copies of Moody Blue we had seen. He had ordered them a few
> days ago when he ran out. "Damn, now I have to find a blue copy."  Well,
> it turns out that RCA double-crossed us and resumed pressing in blue!
> It was those black copies I had in my hands but didn't want that ended
> up being the rare ones.  I finally found a black copy about 5 years ago
> at a flea market dealer who had all his Elvis records marked at 50% off.
>  Great!  After I bought it I called up Leah and just said "Moody black!"
>  She knew what I meant.
>
> > Pablo also did their first series of digital records on red vinyl.
> > I suspect RCA was doing the pressing, although by that time Pablo
> > was saying "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The early
> > Pablo records said on the label that they were manufactured by RCA.
> > I suspect that Norman Granz got that changed once the label got
> > established, but probably kept RCA doing the pressing until Pablo
> > was bought by Fantasy Group.
>
> "Manufactured" does not always mean factory pressing.  If you look at
> Harry Belefonte RCA Victor LPs you see that they are manufactured by
> Belefonte Enterprises, or something like that.
>
> Mike Biel   [log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 18:38:54 -0700
> From:    Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> 1980s US classical records=2Cespecially RCA and (non record club) Angel
> are=
>  unfairly maligned.They are good=2Chigh quality pressings.Angel records
> onl=
> y were really bad=2Cfrom about 1972-79. Roger > Date: Sun=2C 24 Feb 2013
> 18=
> :10:35 -0700> From: [log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] RCA red
> vinyl =
> for digital> To: [log in to unmask]> > > > > -------- Original
> Messa=
> ge --------> Subject: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital> From: Tom Fine
> =
> <[log in to unmask]>> Date: Sun=2C February 24=2C 2013 4:24 pm>
> To=
> : [log in to unmask]> > > RCA Red Seal (classical front-line
> label) =
> pressed its first digital> > record -- Ormandy/Philly Bartok Concerto for
> O=
> rchestra -- on red vinyl.> > Does anyone know for sure if they did any
> othe=
> r first-issue digitals> > on red vinyl? Anyway=2C was anyone else using
> red=
>  vinyl regularly in> > that time period -- 1978-1980?   -- Tom Fine> >
> This=
>  was a prime time for novelty pressings of all colors=2C shapes=2C etc.>
> RC=
> A did the Ormandy/David Bowie "Peter and the Wolf" on green vinyl --> the
> g=
> reen with that particular red label was a rather ugly combination. > Once
> o=
> n ebay I saw a listing for a black vinyl copy=2C which the dealer>
> reminded=
>  us was a "common black copy" not a "rare green copy"!  I've> never seen
> an=
> ything but green copies and there were about ten green> copies on ebay at
> t=
> hat moment!  Quickly buying that inexpensive black> copy I realized
> immedia=
> tely when I got it that it was not really> "black"=2C it actually is a
> very=
>  dark brown that is slightly translucent> when held up to the light.  This
> =
> is a very high grade premium vinyl=2C and> I think a lot of RCA Red Seals
> f=
> rom those final LP years were on this> vinyl.> > Of course we all remember
> =
> the Elvis "Moody Blue" blue pressings.  Only> the first half million or
> som=
> ething like that were to be blue.  They> PLANNED to switch to black=2C
> whic=
> h they did a week or two before he died.>  The morning after he died I was
> =
> in Sounds Good in Chicago where our pal> Rich Markow was a buyer.  He was
> u=
> npacking a shipment which included the> first black copies of Moody Blue
> we=
>  had seen. He had ordered them a few> days ago when he ran out. "Damn=2C
> no=
> w I have to find a blue copy."  Well=2C> it turns out that RCA
> double-cross=
> ed us and resumed pressing in blue! > It was those black copies I had in
> my=
>  hands but didn't want that ended> up being the rare ones.  I finally
> found=
>  a black copy about 5 years ago> at a flea market dealer who had all his
> El=
> vis records marked at 50% off.>  Great!  After I bought it I called up
> Leah=
>  and just said "Moody black!">  She knew what I meant.    > > > Pablo also
> =
> did their first series of digital records on red vinyl.> > I suspect RCA
> wa=
> s doing the pressing=2C although by that time Pablo> > was saying
> "Manufact=
> ured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The early> > Pablo records said on
> the=
>  label that they were manufactured by RCA.> > I suspect that Norman Granz
> g=
> ot that changed once the label got> > established=2C but probably kept RCA
> =
> doing the pressing until Pablo> > was bought by Fantasy Group.> >
> "Manufact=
> ured" does not always mean factory pressing.  If you look at> Harry
> Belefon=
> te RCA Victor LPs you see that they are manufactured by> Belefonte
> Enterpri=
> ses=2C or something like that.> > Mike Biel   [log in to unmask]  > > > >
>                 =
>                           =
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 21:27:21 -0500
> From:    "Richard A. Kaplan" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> Tom, you might be interested to know that Bowie overdubbed the narration
> two years after the orchestra recorded the piece. Bowie and Ormandy likely
> never  even met--not that they would have known what to make of each other!
>
> Rich Kaplan
>
>
> In a message dated 2/24/2013 7:37:27 P.M. Central Standard Time,
> [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> Mike,  once again your posting is educational! I bought one of those green
> Bowie/Ormandy records
> right away. Another one I didn't know about. Agree  it's an ugly color
> combo. David Bowie and Eugene
> Ormandy might be an ugly  combo as well!
>
> Here's a colored vinyl question -- the Crystal Clear D2D  album by Laurindo
> Almeida, "Virtuoso
> Guitar." Was it ever NOT pressed as a  45RPM white-vinyl record? I've found
> several copies over the
> years and all  of them are somewhat noisy. It must not have been very good
> white  vinyl.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From:  "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]>
> To:  <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:10  PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for  digital
>
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject:  [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital
> From: Tom Fine  <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Sun, February 24, 2013 4:24  pm
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> > RCA Red Seal (classical  front-line label) pressed its first digital
> > record -- Ormandy/Philly  Bartok Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl.
> > Does anyone know for  sure if they did any other first-issue digitals
> > on red vinyl? Anyway,  was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in
> > that time period --  1978-1980?   -- Tom Fine
>
> This was a prime time for novelty  pressings of all colors, shapes, etc.
> RCA did the Ormandy/David Bowie  "Peter and the Wolf" on green vinyl --
> the green with that particular red  label was a rather ugly combination.
> Once on ebay I saw a listing for a  black vinyl copy, which the dealer
> reminded us was a "common black copy"  not a "rare green copy"!  I've
> never seen anything but green copies  and there were about ten green
> copies on ebay at that moment!  Quickly  buying that inexpensive black
> copy I realized immediately when I got it  that it was not really
> "black", it actually is a very dark brown that is  slightly translucent
> when held up to the light.  This is a very high  grade premium vinyl, and
> I think a lot of RCA Red Seals from those final LP  years were on this
> vinyl.
>
> Of course we all remember the Elvis "Moody  Blue" blue pressings.  Only
> the first half million or something like  that were to be blue.  They
> PLANNED to switch to black, which they did  a week or two before he died.
> The morning after he died I was in Sounds  Good in Chicago where our pal
> Rich Markow was a buyer.  He was  unpacking a shipment which included the
> first black copies of Moody Blue we  had seen. He had ordered them a few
> days ago when he ran out. "Damn, now I  have to find a blue copy."  Well,
> it turns out that RCA double-crossed  us and resumed pressing in blue!
> It was those black copies I had in my  hands but didn't want that ended
> up being the rare ones.  I finally  found a black copy about 5 years ago
> at a flea market dealer who had all  his Elvis records marked at 50% off.
> Great!  After I bought it I  called up Leah and just said "Moody black!"
> She knew what I  meant.
>
> > Pablo also did their first series of digital records on red  vinyl.
> > I suspect RCA was doing the pressing, although by that time  Pablo
> > was saying "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The  early
> > Pablo records said on the label that they were manufactured by  RCA.
> > I suspect that Norman Granz got that changed once the label  got
> > established, but probably kept RCA doing the pressing until  Pablo
> > was bought by Fantasy Group.
>
> "Manufactured" does not  always mean factory pressing.  If you look at
> Harry Belefonte RCA  Victor LPs you see that they are manufactured by
> Belefonte Enterprises, or  something like that.
>
> Mike Biel    [log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 22:04:03 -0500
> From:    Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> In which case there is no substitute for consistancy. All the presentations
> should run the same way, from the same media, with the same visual
> formatting of documentation. Each one should be so simple a child could do
> it, because that's who you may be depending on.
>
> Is there one app you can specify to the contractor, or bring to the
> conference, that will play both visual and aural elements? You can then
> publish out to the presenters detailed info to meet that standard. I'd
> suggest everything come in on memory sticks, or, better, be pre-loaded on
> the systems; no CDs, no switching computers. Advantages include easy
> copying
> and sharing - a speaker could send it to the "Presentation Technical
> Standards Committee" for a test drive on the approved platform. Those
> platforms, ie laptops, could then be provided to the AV operators from
> which
> to run the day's shows.
>
> If I was running one of these things, after a night of rock-band PA-mixing
> and debauchery, possessing minimal comprehension and language skills, I'd
> love to open My Documents and see:
>
> ARSC Presentations\Thursday\Morning\Session 1 10:00am\Presentation 1\Uncle
> Dave Shocks.ppt
> ARSC Presentations\Thursday\Morning\Session 1 10:00am\Presentation 2\Steve
> Smolian Amazes.ppt
>
> Etc, etc.
>
> Don't know if PowerPoint will support embedded audio at CD quality, but
> treating all elements as slides seems like a slick solution. If there's a
> clicker at the podium, you are in control of everything but the volume.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Steve Smolian
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 5:27 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing
> previous lessons
>
> Many hotels have strict union rules forbidding this.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Frank Strauss
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 3:50 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing
> previous lessons
>
> > One approach could be to rent the equipement and installation locally,
> but
> > ARSC have its own operators. Hands?
> >
> > I have been the AV boy for a local Rotary Club for many years, from back
> in the days of the Kodak Carousel, and I sometimes wish for the return of
> the Carousel, when the worst emergency was a blown bulb or a slide that
> wouldn't drop.  One of the most stressful situations you can have is when
> the speaker shows up, often a little late, and his/her laptop doesn't like
> our projector/sound system, or the speaker brings his/her presentation on
> non/semi compatible media.  MS has planted enough little time bombs in the
> different versions of Windows and PP, so that the 5 minutes before the
> presentation can be excruciating.  The worst case scenario is when the
> speaker shows up with a MAC, and doesn't realize we have a VGA projector,
> even though that information was sent to him/her prior to the meeting. They
> assume we have a converter/adapter and we assume they have done it before,
> and have the necessary equipment. There is no substitute for operator
> expertise and experience.  Also, a very valid point was raised about what
> is on your PP slide.  Way too many people put a slide up and then read it
> word for word. Another annoyance is the use of random slide transitions.
> Just because they are there, you don't need to use them. Maybe a good
> subject for a presentation at an ARSC convention would be how to put a
> presentation together, including how to make things work in the 5 minutes
> before show time.
>
>
> --
> Frank B Strauss, DMD
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 20:26:33 -0800
> From:    Leo Gillis <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> While they were not digital, Franklin Mint pressed their 100 Greatest
> Recordings of All Time on red vinyl. I believe this series started in 1979.
>
>
> ________________________________
>  From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 4:24 PM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] RCA red vinyl for digital
>
> RCA Red Seal (classical front-line label) pressed its first digital record
> -- Ormandy/Philly Bartok Concerto for Orchestra -- on red vinyl. Does
> anyone know for sure if they did any other first-issue digitals on red
> vinyl?
>
> Pablo also did their first series of digital records on red vinyl. I
> suspect RCA was doing the pressing, although by that time Pablo was saying
> "Manufactured by Pablo Records" on their LPs. The early Pablo records said
> on the label that they were manufactured by RCA. I suspect that Norman
> Granz got that changed once the label got established, but probably kept
> RCA doing the pressing until Pablo was bought by Fantasy Group.
>
> Anyway, was anyone else using red vinyl regularly in that time period --
> 1978-1980?
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 24 Feb 2013 21:33:35 -0700
> From:    Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous
> lessons
>
> I do not understand a thing that Carl Pultz wrote.  Our presenters
> come=0Af=
> rom all over the country and all over the world.  We each have our
> own=0Ape=
> rsonal equipment.  Most of us are not computer experts.  You
> cannot=0Apossi=
> bly consider that there would be one standard that all the=0Apresenters
> mus=
> t meet.  You expect us to go out and get new equipment=0Ajust to make an
> un=
> paid presentation that WE end up having to pay for=0Abecause we have to
> tra=
> vel, pay for our rooms, AND conference=0Aregistration.  AND finish these
> th=
> ings far enough in advance that=0Asomeone --WHO????-- would pre-load onto
> e=
> quipment that the organization=0Adoes not have.  This seems to mean three
> t=
> imes the amount of work FOR NO=0AREASON AT ALL.  Just to make it easy for
> s=
> ome techie who nobody has met=0Aand would have different equipment every
> ye=
> ar at our different=0Alocations.  =0A=0AWhat is not understood is that the
> =
> techie is working an audio mixer and=0Aa video projector, and a CD/DVD
> play=
> er, and maybe a computer.  We give=0Ahim our CDs, DVDs, and maybe thumb
> dri=
> ves, or else plug in our own=0Acomputers.  We arrive the day before or the
> =
> day of our presentations. =0AWe are updating and editing our presentations
> =
> the day before or the day=0Aof.  =0A=0AConsistency????  Put the audio on a
> =
> CD.  Put the video on a DVD.  Put=0Athe powerpoint or graphics on a thumb
> d=
> rive.  What kind of an app are=0Ayou thinking of????=0A=0AMike Biel mbiel@m
> =
> biel.com  =0A=0A-------- Original Message --------=0ASubject: Re:
> [ARSCLIST=
> ] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters --=0Areinforcing previous
> lessons=0AFr=
> om: Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]>=0ADate: Sun, February 24, 2013
> 10:04 =
> pm=0ATo: [log in to unmask] which case there is no
> substitut=
> e for consistancy. All the=0Apresentations=0Ashould run the same way, from
> =
> the same media, with the same visual=0Aformatting of documentation. Each
> on=
> e should be so simple a child could=0Ado=0Ait, because that's who you may
> b=
> e depending on.=0A=0AIs there one app you can specify to the contractor,
> or=
>  bring to the=0Aconference, that will play both visual and aural elements?
> =
> You can then=0Apublish out to the presenters detailed info to meet that
> sta=
> ndard. I'd=0Asuggest everything come in on memory sticks, or, better, be
> pr=
> e-loaded=0Aon=0Athe systems; no CDs, no switching computers. Advantages
> inc=
> lude easy=0Acopying=0Aand sharing - a speaker could send it to the
> "Present=
> ation Technical=0AStandards Committee" for a test drive on the approved
> pla=
> tform. Those=0Aplatforms, ie laptops, could then be provided to the AV
> oper=
> ators from=0Awhich=0Ato run the day's shows.=0A=0AIf I was running one of
> t=
> hese things, after a night of rock-band=0APA-mixing=0Aand debauchery,
> posse=
> ssing minimal comprehension and language skills,=0AI'd=0Alove to open My
> Do=
> cuments and see:=0A=0AARSC Presentations\Thursday\Morning\Session 1
> 10:00am=
> \Presentation=0A1\Uncle=0ADave Shocks.ppt=0AARSC
> Presentations\Thursday\Mor=
> ning\Session 1 10:00am\Presentation=0A2\Steve=0ASmolian
> Amazes.ppt=0A=0AEtc=
> , etc.=0A=0ADon't know if PowerPoint will support embedded audio at CD
> qual=
> ity, but=0Atreating all elements as slides seems like a slick solution. If
> =
> there's=0Aa=0Aclicker at the podium, you are in control of everything but
> t=
> he volume.=0A=0A-----Original Message-----=0AFrom: Association for
> Recorded=
>  Sound Discussion List=0A[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of
> St=
> eve Smolian=0ASent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 5:27 PM=0ATo: ARSCLIST@LISTSE
> =
> RV.LOC.GOV=0ASubject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference presenters
> --=
> =0Areinforcing=0Aprevious lessons=0A=0AMany hotels have strict union rules
> =
> forbidding this.=0A=0ASteve Smolian=0A=0A-----Original Message-----
> =0AFrom=
> : Frank Strauss=0ASent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 3:50 PM=0ATo: ARSCLIST@LI
> =
> STSERV.LOC.GOV=0ASubject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Tip for ARSC Conference
> presenters=
>  --=0Areinforcing =0Aprevious lessons=0A=0A> One approach could be to rent
> =
> the equipement and installation locally, but=0A> ARSC have its own
> operator=
> s. Hands?=0A>=0A> I have been the AV boy for a local Rotary Club for many
> y=
> ears, from back=0Ain the days of the Kodak Carousel, and I sometimes wish
> f=
> or the return=0Aof=0Athe Carousel, when the worst emergency was a blown
> bul=
> b or a slide that=0Awouldn't drop. One of the most stressful situations
> you=
>  can have is when=0Athe speaker shows up, often a little late, and his/her
> =
> laptop doesn't=0Alike=0Aour projector/sound system, or the speaker brings
> h=
> is/her presentation=0Aon=0Anon/semi compatible media. MS has planted
> enough=
>  little time bombs in=0Athe=0Adifferent versions of Windows and PP, so
> that=
>  the 5 minutes before the=0Apresentation can be excruciating. The worst
> cas=
> e scenario is when the=0Aspeaker shows up with a MAC, and doesn't realize
> w=
> e have a VGA=0Aprojector,=0Aeven though that information was sent to
> him/he=
> r prior to the meeting.=0AThey=0Aassume we have a converter/adapter and we
> =
> assume they have done it=0Abefore,=0Aand have the necessary equipment.
> Ther=
> e is no substitute for operator=0Aexpertise and experience. Also, a very
> va=
> lid point was raised about what=0Ais on your PP slide. Way too many people
> =
> put a slide up and then read it=0Aword for word. Another annoyance is the
> u=
> se of random slide transitions.=0AJust because they are there, you don't
> ne=
> ed to use them. Maybe a good=0Asubject for a presentation at an ARSC
> conven=
> tion would be how to put a=0Apresentation together, including how to make
> t=
> hings work in the 5=0Aminutes=0Abefore show time.=0A=0A=0A-- =0AFrank B
> Str=
> auss, DMD
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ARSCLIST Digest - 23 Feb 2013 to 24 Feb 2013 (#2013-55)
> **************************************************************
>

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