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ARSCLIST  February 2013

ARSCLIST February 2013

Subject:

Re: Tip for ARSC Conference presenters -- reinforcing previous lessons

From:

Don Cox <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 23 Feb 2013 19:50:21 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (120 lines)

On 23/02/2013, Michael Biel wrote:

> As a public speaker and educator for fifty years, and a five-time
> program chair at ARSC conferences, I disagree with just about
> everything Don Cox said.

Feel free. I also have fifty years' experience of teaching and
lecturing.

> 
> From: Don Cox <[log in to unmask]>
>> NEVER read a lecture word for word from a text. Never, EVER.
> 
> Although I do weekly broadcasts without a script and never used a
> script in the classroom, to not use a text when giving a formal
> conference presentation, almost without exception, results in a
> rambling in-exact wandering around that tries peoples' patience as
> they think "get on with your point already".

Not if you know what your main points are.
> 
>> Usually, the slides are enough to remind you what you
>> are going to say next.
> 
> The sign of a poor public speaker is one who has everything they are
> going to say up there on the screen in bullet-points.  Who needs the
> speaker when it is on the screen???  The invention of power-point was
> the worst thing to happen to public speaking  -- it should be used for
> PICTURES and DIAGRAMS, never words. 

Oh, I totally agree with that. My slides are all visuals, except that if
the lecture has two distinct parts I may put up a title.
> 
>> If not, a simple list of topics in order may help.
> 
> That's what I used in class, but that is not a formal situation.  I
> often made the list of topics available afterwards as my study guides
> for exams.
> 
>> After all, you are talking about something you know and care about.
> 
> But your audience might not give a rat's patoot about it, and you have
> to keep LOGICALLY on your subject so they can understand it.  If you
> know your topic TOO WELL, you might not realize your audience doesn't
> know squat.
> 
I think one should always assume that the audience knows little. This is
why you have to make a clearly structured presentation of the main
points. But NOT read the thing.

>> If possible, avoid using a microphone. It distances you
>> from the audience. (It is like a jazz band using a PA setup.) 
> 
> A sure bet that you have not attended professional conferences. These
> are rarely held in "lecture theaters" or theaters of any kind. They
> are held in hotel ballrooms with thirty-foot high ceilings, square or
> rectangular boxes that have no sound carrying properties whatsoever.
> You cannot hear someone speaking normally fifteen feet away. This is
> why 47 different conversations can go on at the same time in these
> rooms.

Why are they not held in college premises? The only professional
conference I have attended in the USA was held at Rensselaer
Polytechnic, using good lecture theatres.

How can anyone demonstrate any audio if the acoustics are so bad? 
> 
>> Nor do you need to shout to be heard. If you talk, slowly and
>> with longish pauses, to the people in the back row, then
>> everyone will hear you, even in a large lecture theatre.
> 
> S.l.o.w.l.y . . . . . . . with longish . . . pauses. . . . . . so that
> every one can hear you? This is the worst technique to try to make
> your talk interesting in a three day conference where everybody has
> heard seventeen other talks
> already and are looking forward to the coffee break coming up. And
> the longish pauses are the invitation to check your email, twitter or
> text message, look thru the conference guidebook to decide what talk
> to go to next, or to check with your buddy two rows up for dinner
> plans.


Oh, come on. I don't mean so slow as to be absurd. Just not as fast as
in one-to-one chat.
> 
>> The whole point of a live lecture is that it is directly personal.
> 
> NO! That is NOT the point of a live lecture. That is the point of a
> personal conversation over lunch or during the coffee break. Or a
> group of four or five to have a discussion after the presentations.
> The live lecture is to IMPART INFORMATION EFFICIENTLY.
> 
But you can do that on YouTube. There is something about actually being
in the room with the lecturer that makes it worth while.

>> Otherwise the audience may as well stay at home with Wikipedia
>> and YouTube.
> 
> If your topic has already been covered by Wikipedia or YouTube
> correctly, we do not want your presentation at a conference.
> 
>> 45 minutes is long enough.  Regards  Don Cox [log in to unmask]
> 
> Our time slots at ARSC are now, unfortunately, a choice of 20 or 35
> minutes, which is why several have mentioned to carefully watch your
> time. Since a good ARSC presentation is giving information that has
> not yet been the subject of Wikipedia or YouTube -- or else is a
> CORRECTION of the drivel that has been posted and needs to cover
> details of why those jerks were wrong -- these time slots we have now
> are often way too short. This is why Tom on Thursday night gave a
> 2-hour version at NYC-ARSC of his 35 minute conference presentation.
> 
I can't imagine an audience concentrating for two hours. But then, this
is an audience of experts. My experience is mainly with students.

Regards
-- 
Don Cox
[log in to unmask]

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