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ARSCLIST  February 2013

ARSCLIST February 2013

Subject:

Re: Is there a proper term for audio fragments of previous generations found on 1/4" tape?

From:

"Richard L. Hess" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 26 Feb 2013 08:07:40 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (45 lines)

Hi, Tommy,

As to quarter-track 30 in/s playback, this is one of the reasons I have 
invested so much time and effort into the Sony APR line. They officially 
play 3.75 in/s to 30 in/s, although each head assembly is nominally only 
three speeds, but there is a DIP switch in the head assembly that allows 
you to select 3.75 to 15 or 7.5 to 30. That DIP switch also permits 
assignment to 12 different memories (some parameters are preset to 
certain memory locations, such as some are for half-inch tape, some are 
for timecode, some are for mono).

In any event, I could capture some of the 30 in/s material with either a 
quarter-track head if that was ideal or the 8-track, four-channel 
elevator head if we have to look for remaining swaths less than 43 mils 
in width.

As to B-wind, in instrumentation, the IRIG standard was written with 
tracks counting up from the baseplate with the heads essentially in a 
B-wind position due to a turn-around roller, although the tape is A-wind 
on the reels. That conveniently corresponds to the normal topology in 
audio of tracks being counted from the edge farthest from the baseplate 
and increasing as you get to the baseplate.

In both instances, track 1 is the same edge of the tape!

Cheers,

Richard

On 2013-02-26 3:12 AM, Tommy Sj÷berg wrote:
> Hi Henry (and Richard)
> I see a lot of re-used tapes that were never erased - just recorded over. Like Richard says, if the old recording is long enough to be intelligible, it can be saved. "Overwritten" and "Partially erased" would apply for the original program material, but I haven't heard any term for the material put "on top" of the original - perhaps "new recording"?
> I do come across half-track and full-track tapes that have been overwritten by quarter-track recordings. One of the worst cases, as far as playing back, are full-track 30 ips recordings overwritten by 1-7/8 ips quarter-track. That leaves, in essence, a 30 ips quarter-track recording, of which I know no suitable machines to play it with.
> Another thing I occasionally see are half-track recordings where the tracks are reversed, i.e. the left track is backwards and the right is forwards. I came across a possible clue the other day, where such a tape (from 1957) was wound oxide out. I suspect B-wind machines were "mirrored" as far as track placement goes?
>
> Regards,
> Tommy
>

-- 
Richard L. Hess                   email: [log in to unmask]
Aurora, Ontario, Canada                             647 479 2800
http://www.richardhess.com/tape/contact.htm
Quality tape transfers -- even from hard-to-play tapes.

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