LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST Archives

ARSCLIST Archives


ARSCLIST@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST Home

ARSCLIST  July 2013

ARSCLIST July 2013

Subject:

Re: Radio

From:

Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 4 Jul 2013 10:03:23 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (132 lines)

If your tastes include R&B, Soul, and Blues, you'll find two excellent
programs Friday nights on WRUR. 6 to 9 EST is Rejuvenation, 9 to 12 is
Blacks and Blues. Both hosts are experts in their fields, disciplined
presenters, and fine programmers, able to structure interesting sets with
subtle threads of inner logic. Doug Curry, the rich-voiced blues host, also
brings a lyrical, poetic, and wry attitude to his commentary, which I
admire. These shows are local institutions. I think both have been on in one
form or another for 30 years. They are the jewels in our radio crown. Here
and there are other standouts.

For a small city, Rochester has been lucky in many cultural ways, radio
included. We have a full-time jazz station. My alma mater, WXXI-FM, still
does a pretty good job with a full-time non-diluted classical format. It was
best in the early 80s, before I got there, occasionally brilliant thanks to
me (ahem!), and has since carried on the tradition despite all the odds
against it. Not the least of which is its standing in the shadow of a TV
station within the same organization.

It is amazing how much high-culture there was on radio and TV back when. It
certainly did reflect the aspirations (or guilt) of Sarnoff and Paley, and a
NYC-centric POV. It set a standard that many local stations also tried to
emulate. It was also a defensive measure, justification for the public's
generosity in giving them licenses to print money. That chafed, however, so
once the political possibility came around to create a national educational
radio and TV system, the networks acceded to this opportunity to offload
that burdensome obligation. It also gave the industry a perfect,
tax-deductible dumping-ground for its old equipment. But, the public system
was intended to remain a step-child, never supposed to become competitive.
Whenever that seemed possible, there was some hell to pay. Now, it might be
the public radio system that saves radio in the US, like those Irish monks
did, once this Dark Age passes.

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Richard L. Hess
Sent: Wednesday, July 03, 2013 7:54 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Radio

On 2013-07-03 6:43 PM, Karl Miller wrote:
> One can argue as to what was the ultimate motivation for the
> Toscannini/NBC; Bernard Herrmann/CBS broadcasts, etc. Yet, classical
> music has rarely made money. So why was it broadcast with such
> frequency, even by the major networks, earlier in the days of radio?
> Why did early television offer such fine dramatic programs? Were more
> people interested in theater in those days? I think not.

Many of these decisions emanated from New York City which did have a 
strong arts segment and, I recall during the 1970s, the Metropolitan 
Opera ran a subscription campaign under the heading of "Strike a Blow 
for Civilization."

I think in NYC the thought was going to the opera, the art museum, the 
symphony was the culturally important thing to do. Many of these 
premiere houses played to full audiences most nights.

This culture was also important to Europeans and many of the residents 
of NYC were of recent European descent and took this seriously.

Certainly it was a small percentage of the total population, but it 
seemed to be a large percentage of the people I ran into. There were 
many of us from ABC-TV who would patronize the arts. It was fantastic 
working two blocks from Lincoln Center.

My local camera store owner would go to Carnegie Hall on a regular basis 
and enjoyed all the Heifetz recordings and had a cousin who was an 
aspiring violinist. He would tell everyone who entered his shop about 
hearing this or that double concerto last night.

Louis Teicher, for example, who was involved in Columbia Records and/or 
CBS Radio in music supervisory position, was also a major supporter and 
board member of the Great Neck Symphony Orchestra.

I went to (and stayed) at St. Thomas Church on Fifth Avenue for their 
superlative music and cut my teeth recording there. The preaching was 
good, too. This gorgeous structure helped kindle my increased desire to 
experience and understand gothic architecture.

All of this seemed to be a self-fulfilling loop in NYC and since all 
three networks were headquartered there, it seems that was also part of 
the culture that was driving the networks. How long did Texaco sponsor 
the Metropolitan Opera broadcasts? 40 years?

There is a similar lively music scene in Toronto, but I am out in the 
boonies of Aurora and don't participate. People who live in the city do. 
I did not grow up with the CBC, but it certainly was promoting what we 
in Toronto now call "Art Music" back in the 1980s when I first moved to 
Canada.

We have a local orchestra, The York Symphony, which does well and offers 
a mid-level place for young soloists to cut their teeth. I have been 
involved in that for a few years as their recording engineer. Here is 
one freely available example (sorry the soundtrack is mono'd).
http://vimeo.com/20177486

This woman, however, teaches in the NY/NJ area now. We've lost her.

I think prestige drove many of the decisions as presenting this type of 
music was important.

As today marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Battle of 
Gettysburg, I find it interesting that 50 years ago, David Diamond was 
commissioned to set the Gettysburg Address to music. It's premiere from 
Buffalo was broadcast on the CBS Radio Network and I have a full-track 
copy of that made off the Network line in St. Louis.

http://www.peermusicclassical.com/composer/composerdetail.cfm?detail=diamond
SacredGround

I don't see that kind of patriotic spirit in the American Networks other 
than PBS with, I assume, tomorrow nights Capitol Fourth which is always 
a great show. We were there last year.

As a note, the Gerard Schwarz recording (apparently made with Diamond 
present) cuts nicely with the CBS Radio copy to show the difference of 
what might have been vs. what was recorded. I suspect an almost-as-good 
copy of the performance COULD have been made in Buffalo, but it would 
never have survived the network.

It is now a different time.

Cheers,

Richard


-- 
Richard L. Hess                   email: [log in to unmask]
Aurora, Ontario, Canada                             647 479 2800
http://www.richardhess.com/tape/contact.htm
Quality tape transfers -- even from hard-to-play tapes.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager