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ARSCLIB  November 2017

ARSCLIB November 2017

Subject:

Re: 16rpm vinyl recording/playback curve

From:

Corey Bailey <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

ARSC Library and Archives Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 17:00:23 -0800

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (61 lines)

I agree with Richard Hess: “Recording disks at 16 2/3 rpm wasn't a good 
idea either”

What you’re doing seems OK faced with the situation of not being able to 
play the disc at the intended speed.

AFAIK, the discs were recorded flat. I haven’t found anything to the 
contrary.

What I do is make two simultaneous transfers from the same source (I’m 
setup to do that).

This way, I can make one transfer flat and one with bass boost so that I 
create some digital headroom one one of the transfers for post EQ, if 
added.

I do this with all customers so that the source material gets played as 
little as possible.

1/2 speed mastering aside, 16-2/3 RPM was mostly used for spoken word 
recordings and some radio transcriptions.

I have a Dual SK100 that I keep around because it has a speed setting 
for 16-2/3. Yes, I’m aware that the turntable is a puck drive but it 
really doesn’t matter because of the lack of low frequency information 
on those discs.

Of the 16-2/3 RPM discs that I have encountered, frequency analysis 
shows a steep drop beginning around 100 Hz. There were even specialty 
discs recorded at 8-1/3 RPM.

Many 16-2/3 RPM discs had large spindle holes and are/were thought to be 
45 RPM.

Should you encounter any of these discs, know that they were probably 
intended to be played as background music on a Seaburg 1000 which was 
built for this specific purpose.

There were 16-2/3 discs manufactured with standard spindle holes. Many 
16-2/3 RPM discs were designed to be played with a 0.25-mil stylus so, 
select your stylus carefully. Knowing the source and what the disc was 
intended for is really helpful for stylus selection.


Be wary of oddball discs listed on eBay. Many individuals don’t know 
what they have so “You pays your money and you takes your chances.” 
Obviously, there are plenty of knowledgeable sellers on eBay as well so 
know your source.


Cheers!


Corey

Corey Bailey Audio Engineering
www.baileyzone.net

On 11/19/2017 2:35 PM, Richard L. Hess wrote:
> Recording disks at 16 2/3 rpm wasn't a good idea either

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