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DATETIME  January 2018

DATETIME January 2018

Subject:

Re: Division of Year codes

From:

"Byrd, Donald A." <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Discussion of the Developing Date/Time Standards <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 5 Jan 2018 02:13:52 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (127 lines)

Good point about the terminology for divisions in Sec. 4.7.2. But instead of "half" and "third", I suggest "halfyear" and "thirdyear". In the context of time, "quarter" is very clear, since it's in common use; "half" and "third" aren't.

--Don


On Jan 4, 2018, at 8:01 PM, Tony Benedetti <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I know I'm coming very late to the party, but I'd like to make some suggestions about the subject codification (perhaps for the "next" level -- if there will be one).
>
> The codes for the months (1 through 12) are well accepted and understood universally.
> The real problem is that the codes for the other divisions provide no mnemonic value to a human user while either constructing or deciphering a date "by hand".
> I believe that the codes for the remaining divisions (half, third, quarter and season) should suggest (as a mnemonic measure) the type of division to a human user.
> Omission of a "Northern/Southern" qualifier for the seasons can lead to confusion (or worse, inaccuracy). Although a case can be made that since ~90% of the world's population lives in the Northern Hemisphere, a reference to "Spring" probably (possibly?) indicates the season that begins at the March equinox. But it also remains possible that "Spring" means the season that begins in September. There is no way to accurately pin down the season without that pesky "Northern/Southern" qualifier.
> The terminology for the divisions in section 4.7.2 should also be revised. The currently used nomenclature is a mixture of both common and more "academic" terms. In addition, the terms are an inconsistent mix of nouns and adjectives.
> My suggestions are detailed in the tables below my signature.
>
> For what it is worth,
> Tony Benedetti
> Suggested
> (all common nouns)
> Current
> (mixed common & "academic"
> nouns & adjectives)
>
> month month (common noun)
> half semestral ("academic" adjective)
> third
>
> quadrimester ("academic" noun)
> quarter quarter (common noun)
> season
>
> season (common noun)
>
> Division Suggested Current Notes
> Month
>
> 1-12 1-12
> Half
> (Semestral) 1st
> 2nd
> 21
> 22
>
> 40
> 41 Beginning the code for halves with "2" will become recognizable as the "division where a year is cut into two pieces".
> Third
> (Quadrimester)
>
> 1st
> 2nd
> 3rd 31
> 32
> 33 37
> 38
> 39 The same could be said of "3" and "... into three pieces".
>
> Quarter
>
>
> 1st
> 2nd
> 3rd
> 4th 41
> 42
> 43
> 44 33
> 34
> 35
> 36 Look ... it works for "4" too!
>
>
> Sixth
>
> 1st
> ...
> 6th
>
> 61
> ...
> 66
>
> I've slipped in a 2 month division ... might be useful for bimonthly periodicals
> Season - Northern
> (default)
> Spring
> Summer
> Autumn
> Winter
> 81
> 82
> 83
> 84
>
> 21, 25
> 22, 26
> 23, 27
> 24, 28 Okay, so now we have to use an arbitrary first digit.
>
>
> Season - Southern
>
>
> Autumn
> Winter
> Spring
> Summer
> 91
> 92
> 93
> 94
> 29
> 30
> 31
> 32
> The Southern seasons have their own 1st digit. In that way, we preserve the notion that a second position of "1" means the first season of the year. The order of the season names is reversed for the folks who live South of the Equator. The first full season of the year is Autumn -- followed by Winter, Spring and Summer.
>
>
>

---
Donald Byrd
Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellow
Adjunct Associate Professor of Informatics
Visiting Scientist, Research Technologies
Indiana University Bloomington

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