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ARSCLIST  April 2021

ARSCLIST April 2021

Subject:

Re: ARSCLIST Digest - 5 Apr 2021 to 6 Apr 2021 (#2021-73)

From:

Doug Pomeroy <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Doug Pomeroy <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 9 Apr 2021 15:38:04 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (945 lines)

 

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:24:48 -0500
From:    "Andreas K. Meyer" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Hello Eric,

I receive original metal parts from Victor and Columbia catalog
regularly from their vault for remastering jobs.  Much of it still
exists, but condition varies from pristine to unplayable.  If you are
looking to press new 78's from them, the biggest issue is getting the
plates that fit their format.  Those were all destroyed at the
manufacturing plant and as far as my inquiries have gone, no one has the
knowledge how to make new ones for modern pressing facilities.  If you
wish to license, email me directly and I can get you in touch with the
correct people at Sony.

Best,

Andreas
 
Hi Andreas,You may have heard the name Harry Coster, the Dutch engineer whohas equipment which can play old metal stampers. I have heard he
has also done work on a technique for making new ones.

Between 2002 and 2004 I engineered twelve Bluebird CDs for BMG
(WHEN THE SUN GOES DOWN - THE SECRET HISTORY OF ROCK &
ROLL) and I transferred a great many of the tracks from the original
Victor stampers, as I had the equipment to play negatives. BMG sentme everything they had in their vault, and whenever a playable stamper
was available, I would use it instead of lacquers or vinyl test pressings,
since the clean metal generally provided the quietest surface.

Doug Pomeroy
193 Baltic St., Brooklyn, NY 11201-6173
718 [log in to unmask]
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ARSCLIST automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Wed, Apr 7, 2021 12:00 am
Subject: ARSCLIST Digest - 5 Apr 2021 to 6 Apr 2021 (#2021-73)

There are 16 messages totaling 857 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of
    the other companies? Could they still be used? (6)
  2. Allen Lowe's newest project
  3. Books about the acoustic era (3)
  4. [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era (2)
  5. Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era
  6. [EXTERNAL] [ARSCLIST] Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic
    era (2)
  7. [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST]acoustic era: Geo K. Spoor's Phoneidograph?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:43:53 -0400
From:    Jay Bruder <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.

https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/

Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.

Jay

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor demolishedits Camden warehouse.  Does anybody know what happened to Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies?  If these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings from them?


Take care,

Eric

 

 

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 11:57:09 +0000
From:    ERIC BYRON <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

 Jay,
Thank you.  I greatly appreciate your help.
Eric
    On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 07:47:49 AM EDT, Jay Bruder <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
 
 Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.

https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/

Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.

Jay

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor demolishedits Camden warehouse.  Does anybody know what happened to Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies?  If these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings from them?


Take care,

Eric

 

 
 

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:24:48 -0500
From:    "Andreas K. Meyer" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Hello Eric,

I receive original metal parts from Victor and Columbia catalog
regularly from their vault for remastering jobs.  Much of it still
exists, but condition varies from pristine to unplayable.  If you are
looking to press new 78's from them, the biggest issue is getting the
plates that fit their format.  Those were all destroyed at the
manufacturing plant and as far as my inquiries have gone, no one has the
knowledge how to make new ones for modern pressing facilities.  If you
wish to license, email me directly and I can get you in touch with the
correct people at Sony.

Best,

Andreas

On 2021-04-06 06:57, ERIC BYRON wrote:

> Jay,
> Thank you.  I greatly appreciate your help.
> Eric
> On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 07:47:49 AM EDT, Jay Bruder <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
>
> Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.
>
> https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/
>
> Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.
>
> Jay
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
> Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?
>
> I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor demolishedits Camden warehouse.  Does anybody know what happened to Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies?  If these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings from them?
>
> Take care,
>
> Eric

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 22:48:45 +1000
From:    Tim Gillett <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Hello Andreas,

I understood that from the metal parts a 78 RPM vinyl disc could be
pressed  from which a digital dub could be made. The vinyl would  be
quieter than the shellacs originally pressed. Is that so? Or is it
even difficult to press the 78 RPM vinyl because of the shortage of
suitable plates?

Rgds

Tim Gillett

----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask]
To:<[log in to unmask]>
Cc:
Sent:Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:24:48 -0500
Subject:Re: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and
the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be
used?

 Hello Eric,

 I receive original metal parts from Victor and Columbia catalog
 regularly from their vault for remastering jobs. Much of it still
 exists, but condition varies from pristine to unplayable. If you are
 looking to press new 78's from them, the biggest issue is getting the
 plates that fit their format. Those were all destroyed at the
 manufacturing plant and as far as my inquiries have gone, no one has
the
 knowledge how to make new ones for modern pressing facilities. If you
 wish to license, email me directly and I can get you in touch with
the
 correct people at Sony.

 Best,

 Andreas

 On 2021-04-06 06:57, ERIC BYRON wrote:

 > Jay,
 > Thank you. I greatly appreciate your help.
 > Eric
 > On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 07:47:49 AM EDT, Jay Bruder
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 >
 > Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.
 >
 >
https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/
 >
 > Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make
records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.
 >
 > Jay
 >
 > -----Original Message-----
 > From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
<[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
 > Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
 > To: [log in to unmask]
 > Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and
the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be
used?
 >
 > I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor
demolishedits Camden warehouse. Does anybody know what happened to
Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies? If
these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings
from them?
 >
 > Take care,
 >
 > Eric

-------------------------
Email sent using Optus Webmail

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:57:48 -0500
From:    "Andreas K. Meyer" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Hello Tim,

In the early 1950's, a number of 78 metal parts of Victor's was vinyl
pressed before the factory and machines were destroyed.  When we call up
the parts for reissue projects, sometimes we get them along with the
metal. That is usually a happy day as they sound much quieter than
positive metal and definitely shellac pressings.  I have inquired with a
number of current pressing plants if they could press from the original
negative masters, but no one has the correct plates to fit current vinyl
pressing machines.  Some didn't even know what to do with the 78 that
are still in there original shellac beds. 

I have a large project coming in next week that should include examples
of all 78 formats we receive from the vault. I will try to get pictures
to the membership through this list.  Perhaps someone here can suggest a
new pressing technique.  I would love to press vinyl for these projects.
 The metal can be a real pain in the a$sh to work from.  This big issue:
cost.

Best,

Andreas

On 2021-04-06 07:48, [log in to unmask] wrote:

> Hello Andreas,
>
> I understood that from the metal parts a 78 RPM vinyl disc could be pressed  from which a digital dub could be made. The vinyl would  be quieter than the shellacs originally pressed. Is that so? Or is it even difficult to press the 78 RPM vinyl because of the shortage of suitable plates?
>
> Rgds
>
> Tim Gillett
>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: [log in to unmask]
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:24:48 -0500
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?
>>
>> Hello Eric,
>>
>> I receive original metal parts from Victor and Columbia catalog
>> regularly from their vault for remastering jobs. Much of it still
>> exists, but condition varies from pristine to unplayable. If you are
>> looking to press new 78's from them, the biggest issue is getting the
>> plates that fit their format. Those were all destroyed at the
>> manufacturing plant and as far as my inquiries have gone, no one has the
>> knowledge how to make new ones for modern pressing facilities. If you
>> wish to license, email me directly and I can get you in touch with the
>> correct people at Sony.
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Andreas
>>
>> On 2021-04-06 06:57, ERIC BYRON wrote:
>>
>>> Jay,
>>> Thank you. I greatly appreciate your help.
>>> Eric
>>> On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 07:47:49 AM EDT, Jay Bruder <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.
>>>
>>> https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/
>>>
>>> Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.
>>>
>>> Jay
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
>>> Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?
>>>
>>> I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor demolishedits Camden warehouse. Does anybody know what happened to Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies? If these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings from them?
>>>
>>> Take care,
>>>
>>> Eric
>
> -------------------------
> Email sent using Optus Webmail

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 16:24:26 +0000
From:    Steve Ramm <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Allen Lowe's newest project

Here it is. Awaiting my copy:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/cep5il3km5yipxr/Allen%20Lowe%20new%20book.docx?dl=0   Steve In a message dated 4/5/2021 6:05:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, [log in to unmask] writes: 
Paywall  Get Outlook for iOS

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 21:11:03 +0000
From:    "Faranda, Matthew" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Books about the acoustic era

Hey folks,

I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this has been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music of the acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of recorded sound, the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to everything that came after it. For those who focus on that period, could you please recommend what your indispensable list of books about recording production and history during the acoustic era are?  (Meaning not straight discogs or catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for info more about the production side rather than the recording personalities (although there is of course overlap in many cases.) I am a classically trained musician with a background in music history (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!

P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by Allan Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to read it but can't seem to get my hands on a copy!

Kind Regards,
Matthew Faranda
Visual Arts Division
Office of Registration Policy & Practice
United States Copyright Office
101 Independence Avenue SE
Washington, DC  20559-6222

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 15:30:30 -0700
From:    "Paul T. Jackson" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Books about the acoustic era

There were a couple of books which came out in the 60s ...From Tin foil to
stereo. Welch and first one by Gallatt(?) Both useful. At one point I
created a bibliography of recorded sound  but since, lost it. There are
some useful items listed in Music and Reference MATERIALS by Duckles and
others with newer editions


Paul Jackson
Trescott Research
Steilacoom, WA

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 2:23 PM Faranda, Matthew <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hey folks,
>
> I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this has
> been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music of the
> acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of recorded sound,
> the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to everything that came
> after it. For those who focus on that period, could you please recommend
> what your indispensable list of books about recording production and
> history during the acoustic era are?  (Meaning not straight discogs or
> catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for info more about the production side
> rather than the recording personalities (although there is of course
> overlap in many cases.) I am a classically trained musician with a
> background in music history (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be
> afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!
>
> P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by Allan
> Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to read it but
> can't seem to get my hands on a copy!
>
> Kind Regards,
> Matthew Faranda
> Visual Arts Division
> Office of Registration Policy & Practice
> United States Copyright Office
> 101 Independence Avenue SE
> Washington, DC  20559-6222
>

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 22:47:47 +0000
From:    "Gary A. Galo" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

The authors of From Tin Foil to Stereo are Oliver Reed and Walter Welch, published by Howard W. Sams. Finding a copy of the paperback reprint that doesn’t have many pages falling out might be difficult - look for a hard-cover edition. Roland Gelatt's book is The Fabulous Phonograph, published by MacMillan (the original hard-cover edition was Cassell in London).

Some of the research in both books is now dated, but they are still worthwhile. Gelatt is more general and a good read. Reed and Welch is much more detailed and pretty dense. There are copies of both on eBay.

Best,
Gary



-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Paul T. Jackson
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 6:31 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

This message did not originate from SUNY Potsdam or one of its trusted senders. Do not open attachments, click on links, or provide your credentials if the source is suspicious.


There were a couple of books which came out in the 60s ...From Tin foil to stereo. Welch and first one by Gallatt(?) Both useful. At one point I created a bibliography of recorded sound  but since, lost it. There are some useful items listed in Music and Reference MATERIALS by Duckles and others with newer editions


Paul Jackson
Trescott Research
Steilacoom, WA

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 2:23 PM Faranda, Matthew <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hey folks,
>
> I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this
> has been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music
> of the acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of
> recorded sound, the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to
> everything that came after it. For those who focus on that period,
> could you please recommend what your indispensable list of books about
> recording production and history during the acoustic era are? 
> (Meaning not straight discogs or catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for
> info more about the production side rather than the recording
> personalities (although there is of course overlap in many cases.) I
> am a classically trained musician with a background in music history
> (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!
>
> P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by
> Allan Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to
> read it but can't seem to get my hands on a copy!
>
> Kind Regards,
> Matthew Faranda
> Visual Arts Division
> Office of Registration Policy & Practice United States Copyright
> Office
> 101 Independence Avenue SE
> Washington, DC  20559-6222
>

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 22:54:17 +0000
From:    "Gary A. Galo" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

PS. The last printing/edition of both books was 1977. Look for those. The Gelatt paperback with the red cover is the last one, as are the yellow-covered paperback and hard cover editions of Reed and Welch.

Gary




-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Gary A. Galo
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 6:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

The authors of From Tin Foil to Stereo are Oliver Reed and Walter Welch, published by Howard W. Sams. Finding a copy of the paperback reprint that doesn’t have many pages falling out might be difficult - look for a hard-cover edition. Roland Gelatt's book is The Fabulous Phonograph, published by MacMillan (the original hard-cover edition was Cassell in London).

Some of the research in both books is now dated, but they are still worthwhile. Gelatt is more general and a very enjoyable read. Reed and Welch is much more detailed and pretty dense. There are copies of both on eBay.

Best,
Gary



-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Paul T. Jackson
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 6:31 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

This message did not originate from SUNY Potsdam or one of its trusted senders. Do not open attachments, click on links, or provide your credentials if the source is suspicious.


There were a couple of books which came out in the 60s ...From Tin foil to stereo. Welch and first one by Gallatt(?) Both useful. At one point I created a bibliography of recorded sound  but since, lost it. There are some useful items listed in Music and Reference MATERIALS by Duckles and others with newer editions


Paul Jackson
Trescott Research
Steilacoom, WA

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 2:23 PM Faranda, Matthew <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hey folks,
>
> I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this
> has been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music
> of the acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of
> recorded sound, the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to
> everything that came after it. For those who focus on that period,
> could you please recommend what your indispensable list of books about
> recording production and history during the acoustic era are?
> (Meaning not straight discogs or catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for
> info more about the production side rather than the recording
> personalities (although there is of course overlap in many cases.) I
> am a classically trained musician with a background in music history
> (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!
>
> P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by
> Allan Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to
> read it but can't seem to get my hands on a copy!
>
> Kind Regards,
> Matthew Faranda
> Visual Arts Division
> Office of Registration Policy & Practice United States Copyright
> Office
> 101 Independence Avenue SE
> Washington, DC  20559-6222
>

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 18:55:08 -0500
From:    Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Books about the acoustic era

On 4/6/2021 4:11 PM, Faranda, Matthew wrote:
> I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this has been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music of the acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of recorded sound, the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to everything that came after it. For those who focus on that period, could you please recommend what your indispensable list of books about recording production and history during the acoustic era are?  (Meaning not straight discogs or catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for info more about the production side rather than the recording personalities (although there is of course overlap in many cases.) I am a classically trained musician with a background in music history (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!
>
> P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by Allan Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to read it but can't seem to get my hands on a copy!

Hi Matthew:

Once you've read /Recording the Twentie/s, see if you can find a copy of
Sutton's /A Phonograph in Every home /and his recent work on Race
Records. You might also look up Frederick Gaisberg's /The Music Goes
Round/; he was an A_&R rep for Victor in the early 1900s You should
probably take what he rites with several grains of salt, but it's still
invaluable. You might also check out the memoirs of Harry & Raymond Sooy:

https://digital.hagley.org/sooybros

Peace,
Paul




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 19:06:26 -0500
From:    Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

On 4/6/2021 6:55 PM, Paul Stamler wrote, with several typos creeping in
(they're corrected in this copy):
> Hi Matthew:
>
> Once you've read "Recording the Twenties", see if you can find a copy
> of Sutton's "A Phonograph in Every home" and his recent work on Race
> Records. You might also look up Frederick Gaisberg's "The Music Goes
> Round"; he was an A & R rep for Victor in the early 1900s. You should
> probably take what he writes with several grains of salt, but it's
> still invaluable. You might also check out the memoirs of Harry &
> Raymond Sooy:
>
> https://digital.hagley.org/sooybros
>
> Peace,
> Paul


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 7 Apr 2021 01:02:27 +0000
From:    "Gary A. Galo" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [ARSCLIST] Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

Gaisberg worked for G&T, not Victor.

Best,
Gary



-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Paul Stamler
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 8:06 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [ARSCLIST] Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

This message did not originate from SUNY Potsdam or one of its trusted senders. Do not open attachments, click on links, or provide your credentials if the source is suspicious.


On 4/6/2021 6:55 PM, Paul Stamler wrote, with several typos creeping in (they're corrected in this copy):
> Hi Matthew:
>
> Once you've read "Recording the Twenties", see if you can find a copy
> of Sutton's "A Phonograph in Every home" and his recent work on Race
> Records. You might also look up Frederick Gaisberg's "The Music Goes
> Round"; he was an A & R rep for Victor in the early 1900s. You should
> probably take what he writes with several grains of salt, but it's
> still invaluable. You might also check out the memoirs of Harry &
> Raymond Sooy:
>
> https://digital.hagley.org/sooybros
>
> Peace,
> Paul


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 7 Apr 2021 02:21:26 +0000
From:    Allen Koenigsberg <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST]acoustic era: Geo K. Spoor's Phoneidograph?

Does anyone know anything about Geo.K. Spoor's working on the "phoneidograph" ca 1905-1907?It was an early film/cylinder record system for "Talkies".
Allen

Allen Koenigsberg
[log in to unmask]

-----Original Message-----
From: Gary A. Galo <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tue, Apr 6, 2021 6:57 pm
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

PS. The last printing/edition of both books was 1977. Look for those. The Gelatt paperback with the red cover is the last one, as are the yellow-covered paperback and hard cover editions of Reed and Welch.

Gary




-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Gary A. Galo
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 6:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

The authors of From Tin Foil to Stereo are Oliver Reed and Walter Welch, published by Howard W. Sams. Finding a copy of the paperback reprint that doesn’t have many pages falling out might be difficult - look for a hard-cover edition. Roland Gelatt's book is The Fabulous Phonograph, published by MacMillan (the original hard-cover edition was Cassell in London).

Some of the research in both books is now dated, but they are still worthwhile. Gelatt is more general and a very enjoyable read. Reed and Welch is much more detailed and pretty dense. There are copies of both on eBay.

Best,
Gary



-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Paul T. Jackson
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 6:31 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

This message did not originate from SUNY Potsdam or one of its trusted senders. Do not open attachments, click on links, or provide your credentials if the source is suspicious.


There were a couple of books which came out in the 60s ...From Tin foil to stereo. Welch and first one by Gallatt(?) Both useful. At one point I created a bibliography of recorded sound  but since, lost it. There are some useful items listed in Music and Reference MATERIALS by Duckles and others with newer editions


Paul Jackson
Trescott Research
Steilacoom, WA

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 2:23 PM Faranda, Matthew <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hey folks,
>
> I'm still brand new to the list so apologies if something like this
> has been asked before. I am currently researching American pop music
> of the acoustic era and I've found that in general histories of
> recorded sound, the acoustic era is often treated as a footnote to
> everything that came after it. For those who focus on that period,
> could you please recommend what your indispensable list of books about
> recording production and history during the acoustic era are?
> (Meaning not straight discogs or catalogs, per se.) I'm looking for
> info more about the production side rather than the recording
> personalities (although there is of course overlap in many cases.) I
> am a classically trained musician with a background in music history
> (albeit medieval studies) so please don't be afraid to suggest more technical works. Thanks so much in advance!
>
> P.S. If there is anyone with a copy of "Recording the Twenties" by
> Allan Sutton they'd be willing to part with, I really would like to
> read it but can't seem to get my hands on a copy!
>
> Kind Regards,
> Matthew Faranda
> Visual Arts Division
> Office of Registration Policy & Practice United States Copyright
> Office
> 101 Independence Avenue SE
> Washington, DC  20559-6222
>

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 6 Apr 2021 22:25:02 -0400
From:    John Haley <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [ARSCLIST] Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the acoustic era

Check out Lost Sounds by Tim Brooks--you can see it on Amazon.  Very
important book about early recordings.
Best,
John Haley


On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 9:04 PM Gary A. Galo <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Gaisberg worked for G&T, not Victor.
>
> Best,
> Gary
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <
> [log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Paul Stamler
> Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 8:06 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [EXTERNAL] [ARSCLIST] Corrected Re: [ARSCLIST] Books about the
> acoustic era
>
> This message did not originate from SUNY Potsdam or one of its trusted
> senders. Do not open attachments, click on links, or provide your
> credentials if the source is suspicious.
>
>
> On 4/6/2021 6:55 PM, Paul Stamler wrote, with several typos creeping in
> (they're corrected in this copy):
> > Hi Matthew:
> >
> > Once you've read "Recording the Twenties", see if you can find a copy
> > of Sutton's "A Phonograph in Every home" and his recent work on Race
> > Records. You might also look up Frederick Gaisberg's "The Music Goes
> > Round"; he was an A & R rep for Victor in the early 1900s. You should
> > probably take what he writes with several grains of salt, but it's
> > still invaluable. You might also check out the memoirs of Harry &
> > Raymond Sooy:
> >
> > https://digital.hagley.org/sooybros
> >
> > Peace,
> > Paul
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 7 Apr 2021 12:42:27 +1000
From:    Tim Gillett <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be used?

Hello Andreas, 

Thanks for the information. Yes photos would be interesting. I'm still
not sure what function the plates serve. Are they adaptor plates to
allow for the different dimensions of the metal master? 

I remember the first time I hear a CD taken from a 78 vinyl pressing
from the metal master (Paul Robeson: Songs of Free Men, I think)  and
was impressed with the much lower noise floor than the shellac
pressing could have ever been.

Regards, Tim 

----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask]
To:<[log in to unmask]>
Cc:<[log in to unmask]>
Sent:Tue, 06 Apr 2021 07:57:48 -0500
Subject:Re: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and
the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be
used?

    Hello Tim,

    In the early 1950's, a number of 78 metal parts of Victor's was vinyl
pressed before the factory and machines were destroyed.  When we call
up the parts for reissue projects, sometimes we get them along with
the metal. That is usually a happy day as they sound much quieter than
positive metal and definitely shellac pressings.  I have inquired
with a number of current pressing plants if they could press from the
original negative masters, but no one has the correct plates to fit
current vinyl pressing machines.  Some didn't even know what to do
with the 78 that are still in there original shellac beds. 

    I have a large project coming in next week that should include
examples of all 78 formats we receive from the vault. I will try to
get pictures to the membership through this list.  Perhaps someone
here can suggest a new pressing technique.  I would love to press
vinyl for these projects.  The metal can be a real pain in the a$sh
to work from.  This big issue: cost.

    Best,

    Andreas

    On 2021-04-06 07:48, [log in to unmask] wrote: Hello
Andreas,
 
I understood that from the metal parts a 78 RPM vinyl disc could be
pressed  from which a digital dub could be made. The vinyl would  be
quieter than the shellacs originally pressed. Is that so? Or is it
even difficult to press the 78 RPM vinyl because of the shortage of
suitable plates?
 
Rgds
 
Tim Gillett

----- Original Message -----
 From: [log in to unmask]
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Cc:
Sent: Tue, 6 Apr 2021 07:24:48 -0500
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and
the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be
used?

 Hello Eric,

 I receive original metal parts from Victor and Columbia catalog
 regularly from their vault for remastering jobs. Much of it still
 exists, but condition varies from pristine to unplayable. If you are
 looking to press new 78's from them, the biggest issue is getting the
 plates that fit their format. Those were all destroyed at the
 manufacturing plant and as far as my inquiries have gone, no one has
the
 knowledge how to make new ones for modern pressing facilities. If you
 wish to license, email me directly and I can get you in touch with
the
 correct people at Sony.

 Best,

 Andreas

 On 2021-04-06 06:57, ERIC BYRON wrote:

 > Jay,
 > Thank you. I greatly appreciate your help.
 > Eric
 > On Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 07:47:49 AM EDT, Jay Bruder
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 >
 > Here is a part of the answer from Allan Sutton's blog post.
 >
 >
https://78records.wordpress.com/2020/12/02/tales-from-the-vault-the-unauthorized-columbia-vinyl-pressings-1960/
 >
 > Given the money and necessary permissions you can certainly make
records from old metal parts if they are still in decent condition.
 >
 > Jay
 >
 > -----Original Message-----
 > From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
<[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of ERIC BYRON
 > Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 6:29 PM
 > To: [log in to unmask]
 > Subject: [ARSCLIST] [78-L] What happened to Columbia's masters and
the masters from some of the other companies? Could they still be
used?
 >
 > I know many of Victor's masters were destroyed when Victor
demolishedits Camden warehouse. Does anybody know what happened to
Columbia'smasters and the masters from some of the other companies? If
these masterswere found, would it still be possible to make recordings
from them?
 >
 > Take care,
 >
 > Eric 
-------------------------
Email sent using Optus Webmail

------------------------------

End of ARSCLIST Digest - 5 Apr 2021 to 6 Apr 2021 (#2021-73)
************************************************************

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