LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for MARC Archives


MARC Archives

MARC Archives


MARC@LISTSERV.LOC.GOV


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MARC Home

MARC Home

MARC  July 1997

MARC July 1997

Subject:

Is Precision Too Precise?: 'Neo-Conventional' Functionality for User-Controlled Information Retrieval

From:

Gerry McKiernan <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

USMARC <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 12 Jul 1997 15:43:54 CDT

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (145 lines)

             _Is Precision Too Precise?:
    'Neo-Conventional' Functionality for User-Controlled
                 Information Retrieval_

   As part of my never-ending review of Data Mining and Knowledge
Discovery in Databases, I initially focused on technologies
or approaches that would explicitly enhance identification of
relevant records by increasing the precision of results.

   Implicit in my review is a complementary belief that there is
also a need to provide opportunities not only for systems and
algorithms to mine data and discover knowledge, but also a need
to enable users to mine and discover data and knowledge within
a 'structured Information Space'. That we need to recognize
the inherent desire [shall we say the Human Need to Browse]
to discover and therefore need to create information systems that
facilitate such discovery in a user's Information Quest.

   [For a great review on the topic of browsing, folk are
referred to the excellent work of Chang and Rice as well
as the bibliography by Kurth and Petters noted below:

   Shan-ju Chang and Ronald E. Rice, "Browsing: a multidimensional
     framework," Annual review of information science and technology
     28:231-276 (1993).

     Martin Kurth and Thomas A Peters, "Browsing in information
     systems: an extensive annotated bibliography of the
     literature," Library hi tech bibliography 10: x, 275 1995]

    Belkin (at Rutgers) as well as others have clearly documented
the users desire to truly _interact_ with information systems in
the Information Seeking process.

    My belief in the value of structured browsing for Knowledge
Discovery was the prime reason why I adopted a standard library
classification scheme for my CyberStacks(sm) collection. Likewise
recognition of the inherent limitations of the use of one
structured Information Space, led me to not only consider
the benefits of a search engine [still pending], but the benefits
of enhancing the search process by the use of appropriate
algorithms that would increase the identification of the most
relevant set of records, thereby alleviating the use of the
the associated tedium.

    My recognition of the nature and value of browsing so well
documented by Chang and Rice in their seminal review paper
noted above, has led me to create two 'neo-conventional' mechanisms
with CyberStacks(sm) that offer users a new ['neo'=new] type of
browsing that had not been available in conventional public information
public information systems at the time [Since creating these
function, the experimental online catalog of the Library
of Congress has in fact incorporated features that facilitate
enhanced structured browsing. For a test drive of this experimental
OPAC, users are invited to visit my Onion Patch(sm) project at:

    http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Onion.htm  ]

  Within CyberStacks(sm), I have created a Cross-Classification
Index. This index also users to browse resources classified
within an individual LC category from an alphabetical listing
of the Library of Congress topic headings associated with a
specific class number. It is an effort to provide an entry
vocabulary to a classification range in which users will
find related classification topics offered for their consideration.
This functionality has been provided in the belief that many
users do not know _exactly_ what they want, but they know it
when they see it [It's like when I go shopping with my wife
for a new shirt or pair of shoes - I can't always explain the
style or color of what I want, but when I find it, I (usually)
know it [and buy it] [:->]!]

   A second 'neo-conventional' functionality that has been greatly
expanded in CyberStacks(sm) is a Title Index icon-link that allows
users to enter the segment of the CyberStacks(sm) where an
individual resource has been described and classified along
with others of a similar classification. This feature allows
users to move from a possibly-relevant title into the subject
class where it has been classified and presents users with
resources that also may be relevant given their similar grouping.
It's the equivalent of allowing users to browse the shelves of
a library from a selected title, a feature found within the
Library of Congress experimental system, that appears to becoming
commonplace in more OPAC systems (e.g. Innovative Interfaces)

   My Cross-Classification Index is viewed as a precursor to
other kinds of browsing structures within CyberStacks(sm),
notably a 'hyper-thesaurus' that would allow users to browse
the syndectic structure (e.g. broader, narrower, and related)
terms, phrases and/or subject headings assigned to records
within a database (WWW, OPAC, etc.). I expect that the new
Scout Report Signpost that uses not only the Library of
Congress classification, but LC subject headings (LCSH)
and/or the ADAM project in the UK that uses the _Art and
Architecture Thesaurus_ will be among the first to provide
enhanced structured browsing to their respective collections
through the implementation of some form of 'hyper-thesaurus'.

    In addition to enhancing access to information through
the use of conventional structures, I believe that we will
also see the development of 'neo-conventional' vocabulary
structures that will allow users to browse through pathways
of linked subject headings derived from the associations
of subject headings and their associations with subject
headings of associated records [What?]. A precursor of
this functionality [and my inspiration] can be found
in the 'Related' subject heading option and the 'Sort'
option in the Lib of Congress experimental system. My
vision of such a function is still 'Under Construction'
[I hope that with the right inspiration  I will be able
to (more) fully articulate this functionality in the near
future]

    In the meantime, I would appreciate learning about
other inspired (or not-so-inspired) methods of structured
browsing in Web as well as OPAC databases. [Certainly,
the Information Visualization technologies in my _Big
Picture_ clearinghouse offer 'neo-conventional' forms
of structured browsing]. As always, any and all leads,
suggestions, recommendations, opinions, citations,etc.
would be most welcome!

    Regards,

Gerry McKiernan
Curator, CyberStacks(sm)
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50011

[log in to unmask]
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/

P.S. For an elaboration of the Cross-Classification Index
and Title Index icon-link feature, interested folk are
invited to review my article in the _Journal of Internet
Cataloging_

    "The New/Old World (Wide Web) Order: The Application
of 'Neo-Conventional' Functionality to Facilitate Access
and Use of a WWW Database of Science and Technology Internet
Resources". _Journal of Internet Cataloging 1(1): 47-55 (1997).

                 "The (Dis)Plays the Thing"
                     with apologies to WS

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

September 2022
August 2022
July 2022
June 2022
May 2022
April 2022
March 2022
February 2022
January 2022
December 2021
November 2021
October 2021
September 2021
August 2021
July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.LOC.GOV

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager