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AMFELLOWS  October 1998

AMFELLOWS October 1998

Subject:

Gaining some momentum in the classroom

From:

doctrgus <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

American Memory Fellows <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 21 Oct 1998 18:25:15 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (255 lines)

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------564153367DDBA82676AA5764
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Frances:

Thanks for the note.  It is truly time, now in mid-October, to leave the
beginning-school blues
behind.  Howard and I have been giving much thought to the AMF project
and the work we did in
DC, and we are getting ready to move ahead with improving it and getting
it ready for use in our
classrooms.  In some of our conversations we discussed a few resources
from the LOC collection
that we could be using.  Howard is teaching a survey at a nearby
community college, titled "The
Social Reform Tradition in American History," and we collaborated on
posting a couple of
assignments using LOC material for that course.  To view these, go to
http://www.howhist.com, then
CCV, then assignments.

The first assignment is on "The Cult of True Womanhood," and uses the
LOC's collection of
19th-century daguerreotypes.  The kernel of the idea that we developed
during the summer in DC
revolved around the experience of closely and intimately engaging
documents.  We called it "Reading
photographs and looking at text."  The students really enjoyed the
entire lesson: searching the
collection, finding good photographs, and then engaging the material,
just as we had hoped.  You'll
notice some other related links down below; these complimented the LOC
collection very nicely.

For the second online assignment we used the LOC's
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/vfwhtml/vfwhome.html
which focuses on Votes for Women; Suffrage Pictures, 1850-1920, and
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html , which deals with
National American Woman
Suffrage Association, 1848-1921.    If you get a chance, take a look at
the lesson structure here,
and the questions we posed, and let us know what you think.  This class
was a hit among the
students, too, and we were pleased with the results.

For the 3rd assignment we used the "Votes for Women, Suffrage Pictures"
site from LOC again.  It
is such a rich resource; we could use this specific site over and over
again and still never exhaust its
potential for teaching and learning.  This time we challenged the
students to use the site more actively
-- helping to construct (key word, there) their own learning by
searching and finding and creating
conclusions on their own.  The right mouse button turned out the be the
students' favorite weapon, as
they copied and pasted images from the collection into Word.  We moved
from there into
PowerPoint after a quick tutorial which is online at my site
http://www.elfrank.com/doctorgus/main,
then follow the hover button to "Tutorials."  You should see the work
they produced: gorgeous
presentations, rich in content/research and impressive in the quick
mastery of the new tool of
PowerPoint.  I will post some of these projects to my web site.

Howard and I have collaborated before, most especially in a week-long
workshop that we led for
NMC/ASHP in Williamstown, MA, which took place just two weeks before the
AMF institute.
We are very much on the same page as far as using the new media in the
classroom goes: we both
believe that content drives the research and the learning.  We like the
tools, too, whether the
particular thing at hand is the internet, a CD-ROM such as "Who Built
America," or "Encarta," or a
presentation tool such as PowerPoint or web-page software such as
FrontPage98.  No content, no
grade: this is the message we bring to our students; this is what we
evangelized with our colleagues at
the workshop.  The tools, as flashy as they are, as fun to use as they
are, remain secondary.  We
find that both colleagues and students accept and assimilate this
message.

Sorry I've gone on so long.  I did want to show you what we've been up
to since we left DC.
Please take a look at the site if you get a chance.  We're very much
open to suggestions and
improvements.  As I mentioned above, the AMF lesson-plan material is
very much on our minds, as
well, and we will get cranking' on that pronto.

Arnold Pulda

--------------564153367DDBA82676AA5764
Content-Type: message/rfc822
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

Message-ID: <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 1998 17:17:24 -0400
From: doctrgus <[log in to unmask]>
X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.03 [en] (Win95; I)
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Update, Clinton, Halloween, etc.
References: <v03007806b24aa010bb74@[128.174.26.113]>
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------D38A54FDB3055C337220370D"


--------------D38A54FDB3055C337220370D
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Frances:

Thanks for the note.  It is truly time, now in mid-October, to leave the
beginning-school blues behind.  Howard and I have been giving much thought to the
AMF project and the work we did in DC, and we are getting ready to move ahead with
improving it and getting it ready for use in our classrooms.  In some of our
conversations we discussed a few resources from the LOC collection that we could
be using.  Howard is teaching a survey at a nearby community college, titled "The
Social Reform Tradition in American History," and we collaborated on posting a
couple of assignments using LOC material for that course.  To view these, go to
http://www.howhist.com, then CCV, then assignments.

The first assignment is on "The Cult of True Womanhood," and uses the LOC's
collection of 19th-century daguerreotypes.  The kernel of the idea that we
developed during the summer in DC revolved around the experience of closely and
intimately engaging documents.  We called it "Reading photographs and looking at
text."  The students really enjoyed the entire lesson: searching the collection,
finding good photographs, and then engaging the material, just as we had hoped.
You'll notice some other related links down below; these complimented the LOC
collection very nicely.

For the second online assignment we used the LOC's
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/vfwhtml/vfwhome.html
which focuses on Votes for Women; Suffrage Pictures, 1850-1920, and
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html , which deals with National American
Woman Suffrage Association, 1848-1921.    If you get a chance, take a look at the
lesson structure here, and the questions we posed, and let us know what you
think.  This class was a hit among the students, too, and we were pleased with the
results.

For the 3rd assignment we used the "Votes for Women, Suffrage Pictures" site from
LOC again.  It is such a rich resource; we could use this specific site over and
over again and still never exhaust its potential for teaching and learning.  This
time we challenged the students to use the site more actively -- helping to
construct (key word, there) their own learning by searching and finding and
creating conclusions on their own.  The right mouse button turned out the be the
students' favorite weapon, as they copied and pasted images from the collection
into Word.  We moved from there into PowerPoint after a quick tutorial which is
online at my site http://www.elfrank.com/doctorgus/main, then follow the hover
button to "Tutorials."  You should see the work they produced: gorgeous
presentations, rich in content/research and impressive in the quick mastery of the
new tool of PowerPoint.

Howard and I have collaborated before, most especially in a week-long workshop
that we led for NMC/ASHP in Williamstown, MA, which took place just two weeks
before the AMF institute.  We are very much on the same page as far as using the
new media in the classroom goes: we both believe that content drives the research
and the learning.  We like the tools, too, whether the particular thing at hand is
the internet, a CD-ROM such as "Who Built America," or "Encarta," or a
presentation tool such as PowerPoint or web-page software such as FrontPage98.  No
content, no grade: this is the message we bring to our students; this is what we
evangelized with our colleagues at the workshop.  The tools, as flashy as they
are, as fun to use as they are, remain secondary.  We find that both colleagues
and students accept and assimilate this message.

Sorry I've gone on so long.  I did want to show you what we've been up to since we
left DC.  Please take a look at the site if you get a chance.  We're very much
open to suggestions and improvements.  As I mentioned above, the AMF lesson-plan
material is very much on our minds, as well, and we will get cranking' on that
pronto.

Arnold Pulda

--------------D38A54FDB3055C337220370D
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>
Frances:

<P>Thanks for the note.&nbsp; It is truly time, now in mid-October, to
leave the beginning-school blues behind.&nbsp; Howard and I have been giving
much thought to the AMF project and the work we did in DC, and we are getting
ready to move ahead with improving it and getting it ready for use in our
classrooms.&nbsp; In some of our conversations we discussed a few resources
from the LOC collection that we could be using.&nbsp; Howard is teaching
a survey at a nearby community college, titled "The Social Reform Tradition
in American History," and we collaborated on posting a couple of assignments
using LOC material for that course.&nbsp; To view these, go to <A HREF="http://www.howhist.com">http://www.howhist.com</A>,
then CCV, then assignments.

<P>The first assignment is on "The Cult of True Womanhood," and uses the
LOC's collection of 19th-century daguerreotypes.&nbsp; The kernel of the
idea that we developed during the summer in DC revolved around the experience
of closely and intimately engaging documents.&nbsp; We called it "Reading
photographs and looking at text."&nbsp; The students really enjoyed the
entire lesson: searching the collection, finding good photographs, and
then engaging the material, just as we had hoped.&nbsp; You'll notice some
other related links down below; these complimented the LOC collection very
nicely.

<P>For the second online assignment we used the LOC's&nbsp; <A HREF="http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/vfwhtml/vfwhome.html">http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/vfwhtml/vfwhome.html</A>
<BR>which focuses on Votes for Women; Suffrage Pictures, 1850-1920, and&nbsp;
<A HREF="http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html">http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html</A>
, which deals with National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1848-1921.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
If you get a chance, take a look at the lesson structure here, and the
questions we posed, and let us know what you think.&nbsp; This class was
a hit among the students, too, and we were pleased with the results.

<P>For the 3rd assignment we used the "Votes for Women, Suffrage Pictures"
site from LOC again.&nbsp; It is such a rich resource; we could use this
specific site over and over again and still never exhaust its potential
for teaching and learning.&nbsp; This time we challenged the students to
use the site more actively -- helping to construct (key word, there) their
own learning by searching and finding and creating conclusions on their
own.&nbsp; The right mouse button turned out the be the students' favorite
weapon, as they copied and pasted images from the collection into Word.&nbsp;
We moved from there into PowerPoint after a quick tutorial which is online
at my site <A HREF="http://www.elfrank.com/doctorgus/main">http://www.elfrank.com/doctorgus/main</A>, then follow the hover
button to "Tutorials."&nbsp; You should see the work they produced: gorgeous
presentations, rich in content/research and impressive in the quick mastery
of the new tool of PowerPoint.

<P>Howard and I have collaborated before, most especially in a week-long
workshop that we led for NMC/ASHP in Williamstown, MA, which took place
just two weeks before the AMF institute.&nbsp; We are very much on the
same page as far as using the new media in the classroom goes: we both
believe that <I>content</I> drives the research and the learning.&nbsp;
We like the tools, too, whether the particular thing at hand is the internet,
a CD-ROM such as "Who Built America," or "Encarta," or a presentation tool
such as PowerPoint or web-page software such as FrontPage98.&nbsp; No content,
no grade: this is the message we bring to our students; this is what we
evangelized with our colleagues at the workshop.&nbsp; The tools, as flashy
as they are, as fun to use as they are, remain secondary.&nbsp; We find
that both colleagues and students accept and assimilate this message.

<P>Sorry I've gone on so long.&nbsp; I did want to show you what we've
been up to since we left DC.&nbsp; Please take a look at the site if you
get a chance.&nbsp; We're very much open to suggestions and improvements.&nbsp;
As I mentioned above, the AMF lesson-plan material is very much on our
minds, as well, and we will get cranking' on that pronto.
<BR>&nbsp;
<BR>Arnold Pulda</HTML>

--------------D38A54FDB3055C337220370D--


--------------564153367DDBA82676AA5764--

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