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Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 09:30:30 -0500 (EST)
From: "Thomas H. Bramel" <[log in to unmask]>
To: Margaret Bulger <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Omaha Indian Music now online
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Hi Peggy - Please use the following press release for Omaha. Thanks -
Tom

-----------------------------------------------------

National Digital Library Program, Library of Congress

Omaha Indian Music from the American Folklife Center is now Available
on
American Memory.

The latest addition to the American Memory historical collections
documents the music of the Omaha Indian Tribe. Omaha Indian Music
includes
44 recordings made by Francis La Flesche and Alice Cunningham Fletcher
between 1895 and 1897, as well as recordings made by staff of the
American
Folklife Center at the 1983 Omaha harvest celebration pow-wow and the
1985
Hethu'shka Society Concert held at the Library of Congress. Also
included
with this collection are interviews with members of the Omaha tribe
that
provide background information about the songs performed, fieldnotes
and
tape logs made by Center staff during the 1983 pow-wow, and
photographs
and related publicity materials from the various performances. This
presentation was made possible by the generous support of the Texaco
Foundation.

The oldest recordings in the collection were made by Francis La
Flesche,
the second son of Omaha chief Joseph La Flesche, and Alice Cunningham
Fletcher, a student of Native American life and a champion in the
emerging
discipline of anthropology.  During the late 1800s and early 1900s,
the
two worked to collect materials to document the history of the Omaha
people and eventually published The Omaha Tribe in 1911. They were the
first to document Omaha music on the reservation.  In 1985, 44 of
their
recordings were published as an LP by the American Folklife Center.
The
liner notes and other documents related to this recording are included
with this online collection.

In the 1980s, staff from the American Folklife Center visited the
Omaha
tribe to return copies of the Fletcher and La Flesche recordings to
the
tribe.  During these visits staffers were able to record the music
from
pow-wows such as the one in 1983. Users of this collection can listen
to
that pow-wow from beginning to end.  Folklife staff were also able to
interview members of the tribe about their music. The interviews
provide
contextual information about the songs. Of special interest will be
segments from an interview with John Turner, an elder of the tribe who
was
a singer and flute player, and Rufus White, the lead singer of the
Host
Drum in 1983.  These recordings, which were made a few months before
John
Turner's death and shortly before the 1999 pow-wow, provide
translations
and interesting insight into the songs presented.

The Omaha Tribe presently has 4,950 members, with approximately half
living on the 261 mile Omaha reservation located in Macy, Walthill,
and
Rosalie, Nebraska.

This collection can be found at the following URL:
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/omhhtml/

Please direct any questions to [log in to unmask]