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The lacquer is simply a protective coating against physical and chemical
damage. If the metal layer is still present, then the disc should be
readable and the information should be transferred at once to a good
disc. If the metal layer came off as well, then it might be possible to
find a CD-ROM manufacturer willing to remetallize and recoat the disc
provided that the actual information is still present. This should be
achievable if the disc is a molded replica. If it is a CD-R, then the
dye layer may be damaged.

Best to qualify media in advance to ensure that this problem will not
occur. Media Sciences conducts such longevity tests, and rarely
encounters such a problem. Longevity issues are discussed on our web
site: http://www.mscience.com/pub.html

J. Hartke
Media Sciences, Inc.

Aaron Z Snyder wrote:
>
> I was disappointed to see on "Save Our Sounds" that the Library of Congress
> considers peeling and flaking lacquers irreparable. I have one such disk,
> and was hoping that the prognosis was more positive.
>
> I figure that if anyone knows the definitive answer(s), it must be one or
> more of the members of this group. Is a peeling/flaking lacquer disk truly
> irreparable? Are there any optical methods of retrieving the audio
> information from these disks?
>
> Any responses, including negative ones, will be *greatly* appreciated.
>
> Aaron Z Snyder
> 14 HEATHWOOD LN
> CHESTNUT HILL MA 02467-2685 US
> Tel: +1 617 232-6224   Fax +1 617 731-2272