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Maybe so, but I hear differences sufficient to have made lazy old me take
time to investigate this.

Steve Smolian

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Steven Smolian    301-694-5134
Smolian Sound Studios
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CDs made from old recordings,
Five or one or lifetime hoardings,
Made at home or concert hall,
Text and pics explain it all.
at www.soundsaver.com
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Mike Richter" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2003 4:45 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] CD Burners


> At 03:38 PM 3/19/2003 -0500, Steven Smolian wrote:
> >Has anyone checked for differences in audio quality between the original
and
> >the copy?  I've notices recognizible changes caused by CD writing
software
> >that is often blamed on the writer.
> >
> >I'm now well convinced that Roxio 5, full version, whatever they call it,
> >"softens" some attacks and spreds some notes in lower frequencies.  I get
> >tighter sound that more accurately reflects what I hear when playing back
a
> >Sound Forge sound file from Magix Audio Cleaing Lab 3.0.
> >
> >What we hear is subjective and often does not show up in anything that
can
> >be measured.  Nevertheless, I've done serious a/b testing here enough to
> >convice me to change.
> >
> >I've not seen this issue addressed elsewhere.
>
> You may have convinced yourself of the difference, but it cannot occur. If
> you begin with a "redbook" WAV, the software merely rearranges the bits to
> make the data stream that is recorded. The software does not alter
> frequency response, dynamics, separation or anything else in the audio
> stream. There are issues when a non-redbook file (e.g., monaural or 22.05
> ksps) is written directly, but if you begin with a 44.1 ksps, two-channel,
> 16-bit, uncompressed PCM WAV, you will be able to retrieve it perfectly if
> the recorder writes perfectly to your chosen medium at your chosen speed.
>
> I have proved that a WAV file recorded with ECDC 5 (and other programs) to
> an audio disc can be extracted (using Exact Audio Copy to correct for
> offset) to a WAV file which matches the original in every bit.
>
>
> Mike
> [log in to unmask]
> http://www.mrichter.com/