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Konrad,

I followed your link and checked out your credits. Impressive! Sometime I'll
have to check them
against our data.

Hope to see you in Cleveland,

best wishes,

David N. Lewis
Assistant Classical Editor
All Media Guide 
301 E. Liberty Suite 400
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
[log in to unmask] 

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Konrad Strauss
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:55 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] CDR media longevity


on 1/20/04 5:02 PM, Jos Van Dyck at [log in to unmask] wrote:

.
>
> Which media would you recommend for real time (1x) recording, e.g. 
> with Sony CDR-W66?

Most CD-Rs are optimized for high speed recording and perform poorly at 1x.
However, music CD-Rs are optimized for 1x recording. The Verbatim perform
very well, however you will be limited to silver/cyanine discs which are not
considered to be archival quality. I would suggest that you upgrade your
burner to an Alesis Masterlink. This is a hard disc recorder with an
integrated CD burner which runs at 4x. The performance is excellent with
Mitsui gold and Tayio discs.

>
> What other digital storage media is more reliable than CDR (computer 
> tapes, hard disks)? What types of streamer tapes (AIT, DLT, SDLT, 
> LTO)?
>

I believe that the trend is to move away from CD-R as a carrier to a
file-based storage. Most archives cannot afford to put together an online
storage system, but if you have a digital audio workstation of some sort,
you could start recording to firewire drives and archiving the drives
themselves.

There are a number of advantages to this approach. Assuming you are
recording using standard file formats - AIFF/WAV, you are not locked
exclusively into the CD format and the files would be readable by any
workstation. Second, migration is very simple, simply a file copy from one
disc to another - a 120 gig hard drive (about 200 hours of stereo audio) can
be copied in about an hour. Finally, you can begin archiving at a higher
resolution.

--
Konrad Strauss
Director of Recording Arts
Associate Professor of Music
Indiana University School of Music http://php.indiana.edu/~kstrauss
http://www.music.indiana.edu/som/audio