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Here's something new on the Library of Congress website,
in time for Black History Month:

African American Sites in the Digital Collections
http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/afam/afam-home.html

This guide highlights contributions by African Americans to the arts,
education, industry, literature, politics and much more as represented
in the vast online collections of the Library of Congress.

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And don't forget about all the American Memory collections,
particularly the ones with strong African-American emphasis:

The African-American Experience in Ohio: Selections from the
Ohio Historical Society
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award97/ohshtml/
African American Odyssey
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/
African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel
A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aap/
African-American Sheet Music, 1850-1920: Selected from the
Collections of Brown University
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award97/rpbhtml/
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers'
Project, 1936-1938
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/
By Popular Demand: Jackie Robinson and Other Baseball
Highlights, 1860s-1960s
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/jrhtml/
The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award99/ncuhtml/
The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/doughtml/
 From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet
Collection, 1824-1909
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aapchtml/
Maps of Liberia, 1830-1870 - The American Colonization
Society Collection
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/libhtml/
"Now What a Time": Blues, Gospel, and the Fort Valley
Music Festivals, 1938-1943
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ftvhtml/
Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/sthtml/
Voices from the Days of Slavery: Former Slaves Tell
Their Stories
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/vfshtml/
The Zora Neale Hurston plays at the Library of Congress
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/znhhtml/

There are many other collections with strong African-American
materials.  For example, photographers William Gottlieb (William P. Gottlieb:
Photographs from the Golden Age of Jazz) and Carl Van Vechten
(Creative Americans: Portraits by Carl Van Vechten, 1932-1964 )
took quite a few photos of African-American musicians, and most of the
folklife collections from the South include some African-American
materials.  (Tip: to get to a list of just the collections from the American
Folklife Center, choose "collection finder" and click the first link under
"Library Division.")

So please don't forget to search across the collections for names
of people or events.

And don't overlook these Online Exhibitions:

African American Mosaic
      http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/intro.html
African American Odyssey (also listed above)
      http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/
Creative Space: Fifty Years of Robert Blackburn's Printmaking Workshop
      http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/blackburn/

*****

Please share with the list some resources you've found in
American Memory and elsewhere.

Later,

Betty Brown
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