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I had someone in my office do the following test just to give you some
feedback about your question regarding BWF and player capability.  All of
the listed files are native BWF:
--------------------
FILE TYPE           Windows Media Player 9.0        QuickTime 6.0
16 Bit 44.1 KHz         Plays OK                               Plays Ok
24 Bit 44.1 KHz         Does Not Play                       Plays OK
16 Bit 48 KHz           Plays OK                                Plays OK
24 Bit 48 KHz           Does Not Play                        Plays OK
16 Bit 96 KHz           Plays OK                               Does Not Play
24 Bit 96 KHz           Does Not Play                       Does Not Play

It seems that all the 16 Bit files play OK on WMP but not 24 Bit Files.
QuickTime plays everything that is not 96 KHz.  The "properties" of the
files that played did not show the expected sample rate, however they
sounded fine and loaded into the player quickly...
--------------------
FYI
--
John Spencer
http://www.bridgemediasolutions.com/

> From: "Steven C. Barr" <[log in to unmask]>
> Reply-To: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2004 18:52:04 -0500
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] ARSCLIST Digest - .BWF backward compatibility
>
> But...as an average, everyday home computer user...what am I likely to have
> that can open and play a .bwf file? In other words, what do I...or can I..
> use as the default association for *.bwf? *.wav will either open Windows
> Sound Recorder or one of the free sound-file players I have installed...and
> I will hear the contents of the sound file. *.mp3 does likewise...which is
> why I can click on "Hear the song" on many web sites and hear it. If *.bwf
> has no equivalent, readily-available default player, then it would be great
> for archiving sound files (if you have the program needed for playback)...
> but not so good for making an archive accessible (which, IMO, it should
> be!)...
> Steven C. Barr