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Thanks Sylvia.

I hope to update the study once I finish my dissertation in the spring and
find a tenure-track position teaching cataloging and organizing courses
for next fall. Once those pesky little things are done, I can think about
another bibliographic control education study. :) It might be fun to track
the trends every five years or so.

Danny

Daniel N. Joudrey
Doctoral Candidate and Teaching Fellow
School of Information Sciences
University of Pittsburgh



On Tue, 31 Aug 2004, Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis wrote:

> Daniel,
>
> Your CCQ article was a great contribution to the education of
> catalogers! I recall reading it and referred back to it last year when
> writing up the results of my work.
>
> Updating the article would be a real asset! How can we convince you?
>
> Sylvia
>
> Sylvia Hall-Ellis, Ph.D.
> Library and Information Science Program
> College of Education
> University of Denver
> Denver, Colorado 80208
> 303-871-7881
> 303-756-0424 - fax
> **********************
>
> Daniel N. Joudrey wrote:
>
>
> >Educat list,
> >
> >About four years ago, for my first research project I analyzed the
> >websites for US graduate LIS programs (in CCQ 34, no. 1/2). This content
> >analysis was supplemented, when the information was not available on the
> >web, by contacting the school by email and/or by phone. At that time, in
> >2000, I found that 19 LIS programs required at least one cataloging
> >course, while 22 required an organization of information course. My
> >distinction between the two labels was that "Cataloging" courses focused
> >on traditional library practices, while "Organizing" courses took a
> >broader approach by looking at a number of different environments. The
> >distinction, of course, is artificial and open to interpretation. As
> >Melanie points out, the names of the courses weren't always cooperative;
> >they didn't always reflect the course content displayed on the website
> in
> >syllabi and in course descriptions. Often a course called "Information
> >Organization" focused only on cataloging, whereas a course called
> >"Cataloging I" sometimes included content such as EAD and Dublin Core.
> As
> >I said, the information is 4 years old. I would love to go back and
> update
> >the study, but that pesky dissertation is keeping me busy.
> >
> >Danny
> >
> >Daniel N. Joudrey
> >Doctoral Candidate and Teaching Fellow
> >School of Information Sciences
> >University of Pittsburgh
> >
> >
> >
> >On Tue, 31 Aug 2004, Melanie A Kimball wrote:
> >
> >> I look forward to reading this report.  Clearly it's very improtant for
> >> all of us who teach cataloging. I am curious as to whether the six
> >> programs were self-identified or if you got the information in another
> >> way, say off the website for each program.  For instance, our program
> >> requires cataloging for all our students,
> >> but we call it "Organization and Control of Recorded Information I" so
> it
> >> might not be immediately apparant that it includes basic cataloging and
> >> classification.  I am very curious to know whether we were included in
> >> that list of six schools and also would love to know which schools (in
> >> addition to us) still require cataloging.  Could you list them or is
> that
> >> confidential?
> >>
> >> Thanks!
> >> Melanie
> >>
> >>
> ************************************************************************
> *******
> >> Melanie A. Kimball, Assistant Professor
> >> Department of Library and Information Studies
> >> School of Informatics
> >> University at Buffalo, State University of New York
> >> 534 Baldy Hall
> >> Buffalo, New York  14260-1020
> >> Phone: (716) 645-2412, Ext. 1221
> >
>