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We were using Retrospect software.

On Jun 9, 2005, at 9:10 PM, John Spencer wrote:

> Ken,
>
> were you using a specific software backup application, or using
> Windows generic backup utility, or a TAR archive?
>
> John
>
> John Spencer
> www.bridgemediasolutions.com
>
>
> On Jun 9, 2005, at 7:46 PM, Ken Hansen wrote:
>
>> I also would never trust DATA backup for longer than 5 years.
>> The past two places I worked I found this out the hard way.
>> Trying to restore 5 and 8 years old data respectively yielded horrible
>> results.
>> We then implemented a policy to have all Data tapes checked and re
>> backed up to new AIT tapes with the understanding that those tapes
>> would then be checked in 5 years time.
>>
>> -Ken
>>
>> On Jun 9, 2005, at 3:47 PM, John Spencer wrote:
>>
>>
>>> This is an incorrect statement.  There are various backup
>>> applications that will skip a bad block of data and continue the
>>> restore process, as well as applications that will report on the
>>> quality of the data archive as it is being written.  Error correction
>>> is not a function of the data storage tape itself.
>>>
>>> And I would never trust a data storage tape to be readable 25-30
>>> years from now.
>>>
>>> John
>>> John Spencer
>>> www.bridgemediasolutions.com
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jun 9, 2005, at 2:36 PM, Jeffrey Kane wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> I've seen the figure 25-30 years bandied about for data tape. Data
>>>> backups
>>>> are a double edge sword. They have better error correction so the
>>>> data is
>>>> more resilient. However, if there's an unrecoverable error it
>>>> renders ALL
>>>> data for that particular file (and if it's in the directory area,
>>>> all data
>>>> on the tape) unrecoverable. With digital audio tape the error only
>>>> affects
>>>> that portion of the recording.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>