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Few companies provide customer support on products that are 30-40 years old,
let
alone nearly 70.  The engineers who designed the 1939 Kodascope are probably
in
their 90s - I'm not sure how much they would remember if they are still
around.
This is almost like asking Ford to still provide parts and manuals for the
Model A and answer design questions.  It would certainly be nice if this
level
of support was available, but realistically it almost never happens.

I'd see if there is a Kodascope collectors club.  That would be my first
place
to look for info, and the most likely source of parts and other knowledge.

A quick surf turned up this site: http://www.robbiesreels.com/1930.htm whose
webmaster might be able to help you.

Next, I would get my hands on a home asbestos kit (usually used for testing
sprayed on ceilings and heating ducts), and place some belt flakes in the
kit
and ship it off for testing.  This should cost less than $50, and will give
you a definitive answer on the asbestos - which you really need.

Asbestos was generally used on rigid components (brake pads, insulation)
that
are exposed to high heat.  I'm not sure the belt, being flexible, would have
asbestos in it - but then again...

Eric Jacobs
The Audio Archive


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of RA Friedman
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2005 10:25 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [ARSCLIST] Somewhat off-topic: Corporate responsibility
concerning product safety of old equipment.


Recently, I picked up a fully working circa 1939 Kodascope 16mm projector on
e-Bay. I had some 16mm reels and I wanted to look at them.

I took a good look at the machine over the weekend and noticed the primary
motor drive belt was flaking. Upon closer examination, I could see fibrous
material that looked like woven cotton and immediately panicked: Asbestos!

I emailed Eastman Kodak to find out if they had any information in their
corporate archives. I was given a polite "no" and given the age of the
product, I should politely forget about it.
I wrote back and told them this was not acceptable. Since the company had
not changed hands and the product was still in use by me, I feel an answer
is in order. I requested that they direct me to the next level of
management.

I've received no answer. Any suggestions?


RA Friedman, Archivist
Freedman Jewish Music Archive
University Of Pennsylvania

Webmaster, Yiddish-American Digital Archive
(Not affiliated with University of Pennsylvania)
http://yiddishsong.org
Restored 78s in Real Audio

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