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I will need to look back in my files, but I recall that when we harmonized
with UKMARC a few years ago they did an analysis of the language codes
that were in UKMARC and not in MARC 21 that were needed. This was not one
that they requested. I will see if I can find anything further.

Rebecca


On Thu, 23 Jun 2005, John Clews wrote:

> When will any part of ISO 639 list Ulster Scots? I couldn't find it today
> in any part. There was certainly a UKMARC code for Ulster Scots, I recall,
> but I can't find my UKMARC files at the moment.
> 
> Also I mislaid my files of British Library statistics (due to changing
> computers a couple of years ago) which listed British Library holdings by
> language code, so I don't have the possibility at the moment to identify
> the previously used UKMARC code, or the statistics.
> 
> Though a new alpha-3 code would be needed now, not the old one.
> 
> However, In Ulster Scots, there are now many documents - especially
> official ones, as indicated below - as well as many web documents in (and
> not just about) Ulster Scots (also known as Ullans) so it definitely fits
> the criteria for being used in ISO 639-2.
> 
> Given its official status, I propose that it is also suitable for
> inclusion in ISO 639-1 as well.
> 
> 
> I'm tied up full time in other projects next week, and don't have time to
> take the following forward, other than providing this initial information
> below, but might one one of the JAC members be in a position to take up
> progressing an entry for Ulster Scots in all three parts of ISO 639?
> 
> There is a convincing history of use.
> 
> There is a longstanding email list (ULLANS-L) and website for Ulster
> Scots, and now several more.
> 
> 
> Ulster Scots is defined in legislation (The North/South Co-operation
> (Implementation Bodies) Northern Ireland Order 1999) as
> 
> the variety of the Scots language which has traditionally been used in
> parts of Northern Ireland and in Donegal in Ireland [1]
> (http://www.coe.int/T/E/Legal_Affairs/Local_and_regional_Democracy/Regional_or_Minority_languages/Documentation/1_Periodical_reports/2002_5e_MIN-LANG_PR_UK.asp).
> Furthermore The United Kingdom declares, in accordance with Article 2,
> paragraph 1 of the Charter that it recognises that Scots and Ulster Scots
> meet the Charter's definition of a regional or minority language for the
> purposes of Part II of the Charter [2]
> (http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/Commun/ListeDeclarations.asp?NT=148&CV=1&NA=&PO=999&CN=999&VL=1&CM=9&CL=ENG).
> 
> 
> Relevant links include:
> 
> The Ulster-Scots Agency (Tha Boord o Ulstèr-Scotch)
> (http://www.ulsterscotsagency.com)
> (Language, Identity and Politics in Northern Ireland)
> (http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/learning/history/stateapart/agreement/culture/support/cul2_c011.shtml)
> Ulster-Scots voices (BBC site)
> (http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/learning/voices/ulsterscots/index.shtml)
> Pronunciation of Ulster Scots
> (http://www.scots-online.org/grammar/uscots.htm)
> Scots Online (http://www.scots-online.org/)
> 
> The above information was retrieved from
> <http://www.irelandinformationguide.com/Ulster_Scots_language>
> 
> 
> 
> John Clews
> 
> --
>