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What we forget is that not only was aluminum unavailable for use as the base
of lacquer records during the war, but so were many chemicals.  Thus the
makeup of the lacquer may well be different froim that used earlier.  I've
seem memos from RCA addressing this issue.

That means that cleaing and chemical restoration products may affect them in
unexpected ways, the most unexpected is that the old ways may not work at
all.

Answer to David's question re: use of glass in Canada in 1940.  Canada was
at war before the U.S. was and may have been getting blanks from elsewhere.
Were convoys coming back empty?  An interesting historical question.

Steve Smolian


----- Original Message -----
From: "Brandon Burke" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 6:45 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] identifying acetate substrates


> At 03:11 PM 7/21/2005, David Lennick wrote:
>>It's also been my experience that glass discs don't tend to show palmitic
>>acid,
>>but maybe I've just been lucky.
>
> Actually, we were talking about this very point earlier today.  I too have
> found that discs showing palmitic acid are more often aluminum.
>
> Brandon
>
>
> _______________________________________
> Brandon Burke
> Archival Specialist
> Hoover Institution Archives
> Stanford University
> Stanford, CA 94305-6010
> voice: 650.724.9711
> fax: 650.725.3445
> email: [log in to unmask]
>
>
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