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Andy Moorer, the genius behind the original Sonic Solutions digital 
audio workstation (and many other tools of the trade), was last known 
to be working for Adobe and playing with what was Cool Edit Pro and 
became Audition.  A fader with settings from   1-999 sounds like his 
handiwork (based on many similar things in Sonic Solutions).  But I'm 
only speculating.  Further, I know he did NOT write the SRC code in the 
last 5.4b10 version of Sonic Classic (which I believe is the same 
algorithm in HD).

George

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Bradley <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent:         Tue, 4 Oct 2005 21:32:05 -0400
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Requiem for the DAT (redux, was Storage of 
audio CDs)

    >All the DATS I recorded (ten years worth) are at 44.1, and when a 
client >brings in a 48k DAT, I usually transfer analog to 44.1 because 
it seems to >come out just as well or better than a lengthy SRC in the 
digital realm. >Thought or comments? 
 
  If the analog transfer is coming out just as well or better than a 
lengthy SRC in the digital realm, you either have a: Really incredible 
DAC / ADC setups, or b: A really bad digital SRC setup, or C: both of 
the above. I use Adobe Audition to do my sample rate conversions, and 
despite having really high resolution and darn great sounding DACs and 
ADCs, the quality of the purely digital conversion still sounds better. 
Of course, there's a "quality" fader in Audition's conversion 
parameters screen that you can set from 1 to 999. When it's at 999 I 
get great conversions that take some time, but I wouldn't say they're 
"really lengthy" (they're still faster than real time in most cases). 
When it's at 1 I get a completed conversion in the blink of an eye, but 
it's not worth listening to. 
 
  >>One of the challenges is deciding what to do with 48 ks/s DATs. Do 
you >>save them as files or downsample to 44.1 ks/s for audio CDs. 
 
  Since the audio on a DVD can be done in PCM instead of compressed, and 
since DVDs accept 48 KHz PCM, those files will work nicely on a DVD.