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I brought up the Hawaiian case with Darrow since it came later and, I 
assumed, any actor wishing to portray him and wanting to hear his voice and 
manner, may possibly find this one.  I know, I know, run-on sentence.


Steve Smolian



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michael Biel [log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2006 2:16 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Scopes Trial Sound Recordings


> From: "Bob Conrad" <[log in to unmask]>
>> >I have a number of Jim Jordan radio broadcasts from 1929 Chicago, 
>> >station
>> >WENT
>
> I assume you mean WENR unless the recordings spoof a fake radio station.
>
>> ("Mike and Herman")It is just a hunch, but I have always thought these 
>> were
>> >made as auditions, to be sent to far off radio stations in the hopes of
>> >signing them up in some sort of syndication or affiliate deal.
>
> This is possible since Chicago was where the business of syndicating 
> recordings
> of programs was invented with "Amos 'n' Andy" in March 1928 and The 
> National
> Radio Advertising Co's Maytag drama series in December 1928.  But Jim 
> Jordan
> was probably doing "The Smackouts" on WMAQ by 1929, and the names Mike and
> Herman sound like those used in "Louie's Hungry Five" which was syndicated 
> by
> The Chicago Tribune in 1930, and it is known that Jim Jordan had nothing 
> to do
> with that series.
>
>> > and all of them are on uncoated aluminum, some
>> > are 7", others are 5" and all play at 78rpm.
>> > So the technology did exist,
>> > at least in 1929.  Bob Conrad    Fort Lee, NJ
>
> From Steven Smolian <[log in to unmask]>:
>> Any idea of the specific date?  The uncoated aluminums were in use one 
>> side
>> or the other of 1930, but were mostly a "bureau" operation, as far as I 
>> can
>> tell, until home recording units became available as well.  Typically, 
>> there
>> were booths in music and department stores.
>
> The first known Speak-O-Phone installation was in a St. Louis dept. store
> around
> Thanksgiving 1928.  They did not make machines available to individuals 
> except
> for one supplied to Cabel Greet of Columbia University who used it to 
> record
> Vachel Lindsey.  Other companies had machines for embossing aluminum on 
> the
> market by 1930.
>
>> As to those who recorded
>> off-the-air on a speculative basis and made dubs on demand, one service I
>> know of began c. 1934.  There may have been others.  I understand these
>> recording outfits were listed in the yellow pages of the cities in which
>> they operated.    Steve Smolian
>
> There were many recording studios in business making air-checks by the end 
> of
> 1930, especially in Chicago.
>
>> > Steven Smolian wrote:
>> >
>> >> I remember reading that the trial of a navl enlisted man for rape in
>> >> Hawaii (there was a PBS bcst on it recently) had Darrow's jury 
>> >> summation
>> >> broadcast back to the mainland.
>
> What does this have to do with the 1925 Scopes trial?
>
>> >> It could have been recorded either by Ediphone dictating machine or, 
>> >> just
>> >> possibly, by RCA paper discs for use with the Electrola radio and
>> >> recorder. I've seen but do not own some dated late in 1929.
>> >> Steve Smolian
>
> They weren't paper, they were celluloid on paper for the 5-inch discs and 
> vinyl
> for the 10 and 12-inch.  The first machine was the Radiola 86 which was
> released in Sept 1929.
>
> From: <[log in to unmask]>
>
>> >>> [log in to unmask] writes:
>> >>> The trial was the first live radio broadcast from a trial but there 
>> >>> was
>> >>> no recording made.
>
>> >>> William Jennings Bryan did record a number of other
>> >>> speeches some of which are available online at
>> >>> <http://www.historicalvoices.org/earliest_voices/bryan.html> from the
>> >>> Vincent Voice Library (although none appear directly related to 
>> >>> Scopes).
>
> It would have been difficult for Bryan to record anything related to the 
> Scopes
> trial since he died several days after the end of the trial.  All the
> recordings he did make were Edison cylinders and Gennett discs.
>
>> >>> This information is helpful. The people putting on the play somehow
>> >>> thought
>> >>> that they should incorporate a wire recorder into the set. While we
>> >>> could have
>> >>> loaned them a Telegraphone, it is just as well that they don't need 
>> >>> it.
>
> There was a WGN carbon microphone in the courtroom and that was it.  Why 
> would
> anyone have considered having a recording machine in the courtroom since 
> it is
> well known that this did not happen.
>
>> >>> That time period must have been a null in extemporaneous sound
>> >>> recordings.
>
> There are quite a few broadcasts that were recorded between 1923 and 1930. 
> But
> not the Scopes trial.  People have been looking for them for decades.
>
> Michael Biel   [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>
>> >>> Wax cylinders were out of the picture and instantaneous discs had not
>> >>> been well
>> >>> developed.
>> >>>
>> >>> I remember reading in a contemporary early 20's magazine about a 
>> >>> project
>>
>> >>> to
>> >>> archive radio broadcasts on Telegraphone wires. I wonder if anything
>> >>> ever came
>> >>> of that.
>> >>>
>> >>> Mike Csontos
>> >>>
>
>
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