Print

Print


Yeah, I know from reading stuff about Stan Ricker, George Piros and guys 
like that, that they did things their own way.  There wasn't a BS in cutting 
records, so experimentation ruled the day.  So I'm sure some of the 
mastering guys stayed with 1mil mastering of mono records when .7 mil became 
the supposed industry standard.  They also didn't strictly adhere to RIAA 
when RIAA was adopted.  Sure makes it nice to have one of the preamps with 
multiple curves.

Some of those reissues may have been made with the mastering tapes sent to 
the mastering engineers.  They EQ'd the tapes and sent them to the 
engineers.  I know for sure that the original tapes didn't have all that 
funny business on them.  There've been recent reissues by RCA of the 
Dynagroove material that sounds fantastic.  Many people, supposedly in the 
know, like Harry Pearson, state that the Dynagroove process happened post 
recording session and pre vinyl mastering (or at least that's how I 
understand it).    Also, as anecdotal evidence, I compared British pressings 
of Dynagroove recordings to the American counterpart, and the British 
pressing had none of the weird crap going on.  Not EQ'd weird and none of 
what sounded like gain riding to me.  Totally different.  One was the Robert 
Shaw Chorale doing Britten's "Rejoice in the Lamb" and the other was a 
Menotti record that I'll go look for.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mike Richter" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2006 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-static question


> phillip holmes wrote:
>> What kind of cartridge do you use?  You could buy several different 
>> stylus tips to experiment with.
>>
>> Mono LPs were cut with a wider groove, so that a microgroove stylus will 
>> ride much further down in the groove than it should.
>
> The width of the cut varied widely over the years and over the labels. It 
> is quite common to need a 78-rpm stylus for EMI LPs even into the very 
> early stereo era; in contrast, even the early (US) Columbias can be played 
> well with a modern elliptical stylus for 33s.
>
> The ability to de-warp a recording depends on the vinyl used. RCA's 
> Dynagroove recordings seem to defy attempts to apply pressure when warm. 
> Of course, their deliberate distortion adds to the problem of getting an 
> acceptable result. Still worse, it appears from the reissues that the 
> distortions are inherent in the master tapes.
>
> Mike
> -- 
> [log in to unmask]
> http://www.mrichter.com/
>
>