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I've had it work for vinyl, but I've only done it when it was untrackable at 3 grams. So only a few 
times. And even after it's fixed, it's still hill-and-dale hell, so usually not even worth listening 
or transferring. But since so much interesting stuff is out of print or never made it to CD, a fella 
needs an arsenal of tricks.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "steven c" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2006 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] De-static question


> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>> I think the only time you'd do this -- EVER -- would be if you cannot dial
> your tonearm heavy enough
>> to track a very badly warped record. And I think you'd be better off
> investing in a couple of plates
>> of 13"x13" glass and putting the record in an oven on the WARM setting and
> no higher for an hour or
>> two and then turning the oven off and letting it cool to room temp. The
> top plate of glass should be
>> heavier than the bottom plate, so gravity can be your ally. I'd much
> rather take measures on the
>> vinyl than on the cartridge and tonearm.
>>
> While that method works just fine for shellac discs (78's), I tend to
> wonder how well it would work on vinyl records. With vinyl, the warpage
> as actually caused by expansion, and not by the substance becoming more
> flexible as its temperature rises...
>
> Steven C. Barr