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[log in to unmask] wrote:
> In a message dated 2/4/2006 4:46:21 PM Eastern Standard Time, [log in to unmask] 
> writes:
> 
> If people request dvd copies of our material we use stand-alone panasonic dvd
> recorders with success. I copy the footage onto the onboard harddrives and 
> then
> do minimal editing and then burn them onto dvd
> 
> Once the dvd is finalized i make a copy of it with our computer dvd burner for
> our Archives
> 
> Hope this helps!
> 
> Erik
> ****************
> 
> This is the approach we are trying currently, using a Sony DVD recorder. 
> However we are having problems with the burner in the computer and the editing 
> software is inadequate. Using the DVD recorder only, means running the tape for 
> each copy.
> 
> It would be better to go directly to the computer with reliable hardware and 
> software. I'm looking for recommendations.
> 
> Mike Csontos

***********
I discovered the hard way that most standalone DVD recorders do not 
produce discs fully compliant with the DVD standards; they tend to have 
oddities in the TOC which make playback inconsistent and which can 
confuse computer-based drives. I have found the best course, even with 
the Panasonic which appears to be fully compliant is to use DVDShrink 
(PC only) to make the first copy. The files it leaves behind will write 
more copies in Nero if required and I hold the original disc as an 
ultimate backup.

There is a page on standalone DVD recorders in the primer at my WWW site 
(on the side for CD recording). One problem with recording directly to 
the PC is that the software I've found does not support SMPTE time 
codes. The result is loss of A/V sync, usually after a few tens of 
minutes. The standalone recorder has no such problem although 
occasionally one can see a very brief hesitation. (I am told that the 
Mac is not subject to this problem.)

Mike
-- 
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http://www.mrichter.com/