Print

Print


Richard was referring to using a CSS stylesheet rather than an XSLT 
stylesheet to present one display version for the "screen" and another 
for printing using the same HTML code.  We have been utilizing this 
technique at our institution for quite some time.  Since the TOC is a 
navigational aid that is only useful for the screen, I have used CSS to 
remove it when our finding aids are printed.

Fox, Michael wrote:
> The EAD Cookbook has always included stylesheets that excluded the Table of Contents and internal links for the production of print versions.  Obviously it's not a complex undertaking to modify any existing stylesheet in this way.
> 
> Mchael Fox 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of
> Richard Davis
> Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2006 5:52 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: HTML frameset problem
> 
> 
> Mark Carlson wrote:
> 
>> But I would also recommend that you take a look at using CSS to mimic 
>> the functionality of frames. 
> 
> Another advantage of a CSS/XHTML approach could be the possibility of 
> creating a separate stylesheet for printing. This might even omit the 
> TOC, though it display on-screen. There's a good piece on this here:
> 
> http://www.tufts.edu/webcentral/tutorials/printcss/
> 
> Further enlightenment at
> http://www.csszengarden.com/
> 
> Have fun!
> 
> Richard