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On 27/03/06, Karl Miller wrote:
> On Fri, 24 Mar 2006, Lou Judson wrote:
> 
>> Password protected. Can you copy and paste it?
>> On Mar 24, 2006, at 7:11 AM, Karl Miller wrote:
>> 
>>> Just encountered this article from the Chonicle.
>>> Might make an interesting interface to an online catalog.
> 
> Hoping this doesn't send me to jail...
> 
> Karl
> 
> Tapping Musical Memory
> By KAREN BIRCHARD
> 
> Ever have a song stuck in your head, but you can't quite name the
> tune? A new tool developed by three students at Simon Fraser
> University, in British Columbia, may be able to help.
> 
> The Song Tapper, at http://www.songtapper.com, allows users to tap a
> beat on the space bar and get a list of possible titles in response.
> The site evolved from a project last year for an
> artificial-intelligence class and now gets as many as 10,000 hits a
> day.
> 
> "We wanted to do something that involved music, lyrics, and rhythm."
> says Geoff Peters, one of the inventors. "We decided to try matching
> rhythms in one song to rhythms in others."
> 
> The Song Tapper usually identifies the song, but only if the person
> doing the tapping has a passable sense of rhythm.
> 
> Tapping out "The Star Spangled Banner" to demonstrate how it works,
> Mr. Peters produced a list of titles that included not only America's
> national anthem but also "Island in the Sun," by Weezer, and "Happy
> Birthday." (Tapping out "O Canada" brings up many possibilities,
> including "YMCA.")
> 
> Mr. Peters, Caroline Anthony, and Michael Schwartz generated a lot of
> interest in their algorithm-based invention last year at a conference
> on artificial intelligence. Since then, the site's song base has
> increased to more than 11,000 songs, since anyone can add to it if the
> song they just tapped out doesn't show up as a possibility.
> 
> Mr. Peters sees a future for the idea in children's toys, and there
> has been interest in linking the Song Tapper with an online music
> store. In the meantime, he says, the cost of the server is covered by
> the site's advertisers. "Each connection gives us a little bit of
> money," he says.

There is a book called "Directory of Tunes" by Parsons which is a little
more sophisticated as it uses UP and DOWN relative to the previous note.

That could no doubt be converted into a web site.

Regards
-- 
Don Cox
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