Print

Print


Didn't Elton John record there with Thom Bell as well? (not that I liked 
that album).

--On Wednesday, March 22, 2006 8:13 AM -0500 Tom Fine 
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Well, there were some gems that came out of Sigma, at least by my tastes:
>
> 1. David Bowie "Young Americans" (Sigma Philly, 1974)
> 2. Wilson Pickett did sessions with Gamble & Huff that resulted in
> "Engine #9" and re-established his career (Sigma Philly, 70's)
> 3. Steely Dan "Goucho" was mixed at Sigma NYC
> 4. Talking Heads "Remain In Light" partly tracked and mixed at Sigma NYC
> 5. Talking Heads "Little Creatures" same story
> 6. David Byrne/Brian Eno "My Life In A Bush of Ghosts" was done at Sigma
> NYC, using a 24-track to sync up their instrumentals to found tracks for
> "lyrics". Very advanced use of the technology for that time, although it
> was old hat to the electronic music crowd.
>
> Then there were the endless disco session and thousands of vapid
> commercials that paid the bills.
>
> That Gamble & Huff stuff is HEAVILY sampled and used by the hip-hop/DJ
> crowd today. I think "TSOP" was one of the top-selling singles of the
> 70's.
>
> When I was an errand boy and tape dubber at Sigma NYC (1981-83 summers),
> the commercial business was transitioning away from a squad of crack
> studio musicians showing up, getting a chart and cutting a commercial in
> 3 hours to where one guy showed up with a Synclavier and dumped 8 tracks
> onto tape and then a singer showed up and a voice-over guy showed up and
> they cut a worse commercial but in half the time. Nowadays, it's a guy at
> home with a MIDI rig cutting even worse commercials but for a fraction of
> the cost. That's a large part of what killed off the big studio business
> in NY -- the agencies took most of their production in-house and
> musicians' union rates got to where no one could afford big sessions with
> large ensembles anymore. Plus, the um "talent" pool has gotten very
> brackish in recent generations of "musicians."
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Marcos Sueiro" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2006 7:54 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Quarter-inch splicing tabs
>
>
>> Thanks for the correction --amazing that Sigma Sound was still working
>> until two years ago. Truth  be told, I was never a big fan of that
>> sound, although it really is a feat of engineering...
>>
>> marcos
>>
>> --On Tuesday, March 21, 2006 6:18 PM -0500 Tom Fine
>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Marcos:
>>>
>>> It was Joe TarsiA, founder and owner of Sigma Sound Studios. Joe sold
>>> Sigma only a couple of years ago. That place was definitely home of the
>>> Philly Sound, second home of Gamble and Huff (sp?). Their NYC studio was
>>> the birthplace of the Village People, for better or worse (definitely
>>> better for Sigma, as all those gold records led to a disco-fueled hot
>>> hand).
>>>
>>> -- Tom Fine
>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Marcos Sueiro"
>>> <[log in to unmask]> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2006 9:42 AM
>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Quarter-inch splicing tabs
>>>
>>>
>>>> I have
>>>>> had a couple of opportunities to be a "recording artist" (popular
>>>>> music, not classical) and I have found that as soon as musicians
>>>>> find out the opportunity for "changes via edit" exists, they
>>>>> immediately discover a near-infinite number of "flaws" in their
>>>>> solos which need to be corrected!
>>>>
>>>> So true. So goes also with artists who want to change the volume of one
>>>> track in the mix by half  of one dB, or move one note in a solo by
>>>> miliseconds.
>>>>
>>>> Perhaps my favourite quote from an ARSC Conference came in Philadelphia
>>>> from Joe Tarsio, pivotal  engineer for the "philly sound" of the 1970s:
>>>> "Remember, automation was supposed to *save* us  time!"
>>>>
>>>> Marcos