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Well, the reason they don't use just any old record is that after they 
"ricki-ricki-ricki", the record keeps playing into the break or chorus.  You 
could manipulate 1,000,000 Strings, but it'd be damn boring (or at least the 
bass line is very lacking on most).  Many times, they "ricki" to kill time 
till the other record catches up to the one they are "ricki"-ing on.  And 
that's why they have continually variable speed, to match different records 
BPM.  Just watch the film and it'll make more sense.  And I should point out 
that DJs aren't rappers.  NO "kill da bitch", "shoot da cop", "you a ho" 
kind of thing with DJs.  They aren't the same kind of personality.  You hear 
about rappers shooting each other, but I know of no DJ war (to date).  The 
DJs are just making new constructs out of various samples, loops, records 
and anything else they can think of.  And they tend to be very thoughtful 
people.  Also, there's a large industry devoted just to making pressings for 
DJs.  They reissue hard to find records.  To me, they help keep vinyl 
pressing plants, suppliers and mastering engineers in a job.  For that, we 
should be very thankful.  I'll cry when the last record is press, but at 
this rate, vinyl will outlast those shiny silver things.  And don't get too 
appalled about any rare records they might be destroying.  Most records they 
sample are R&B, late '60s and early '70s jazz.  They aren't mixing 10" Blue 
Notes, Martzy and 78 RPM Robert Johnson (although the Beastie Boys mix in 
classical music all the time--and lounge).
Phillip
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2006 6:31 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] The Future of RECORD Collecting - an interesting 
documentary


> Question: isn't "scratching" destructive to potentially out-of-print or 
> valuable LPs? If "scratching" is this "ricki-ricki-ricki" sound that one 
> hears on, for instance, Run-DMC records, then why does a "DJ" need to use 
> a vintage disk to get this sound? Won't a cutout bin 10,000 Strings record 
> do just fine?
>
> What's next -- "stretching" (whereby one takes an old master tape and 
> mangles it so that it bounces and weaves over the playback heads in a 
> "rhythmic" fashion)? Or perhaps "grinding" (whereby one throws old 78RPM 
> records into a blender and uses the powder as part of their pyrotechnics 
> display for their DJ show since it's very clear that real music is not the 
> point of these spectacles)?
>
> -- Tom Fine
> Interested in preserving out-of-print music whenver possible
>
> PS-- Showing the on-going bizarre nature of modern "music," Blue Note put 
> out a record where two German "DJ's" play cuts from out-of-print Blue Note 
> LPs (many of which should STAY out of print because they're early 70's 
> "smooth" jazz junk), processed to death through compressors and bass-heavy 
> equalization, into a digital chain to produce a two-CD set. I won't even 
> ask why not just make a good-quality remaster job from the master tapes, 
> perhaps that's too simple and direct (and perhaps this music only appeals 
> to people who want to hear it processed to death).
>