Print

Print


A variation on this theme of feed drag and tension was the later 
invention and use of servoed feed and take-up reels for capstanless tape 
handling used on my brother's (John Stephens) analog multitrack ATRs 
that are still in use by many engineers who prefer it for mastering. 
Ampex later used a similar type of technique on one of their models 
(John never patented his).  His additional R&D has to do with upgrading 
Bosch FDL60 Telecines.
http://stephensaudiovideo.com/

He is also mentioned in the AES history of American Tape Recording:
http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:21D8Xe9AHy4J:www.aes.org/aeshc/pdf/chronology.pdf+Stephens+Multitrack&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=20

Also one of his legendary 1" cutting/splicing blocks is on sale on eBay:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Ampex-Stephens-signed-Editall-2-inch-splice-blocks_W0QQitemZ7395867404QQcategoryZ15199QQtcZphotoQQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Needless to say, there is a bit of family pride in his accomplishments

Rod Stephens
Family Theater Productions

Robert Hodge wrote:

>Ampex used an indirect drive on their first machines- Models 200 and 300. The fine speed adjustment for the capstan drive was accomplished by adding and subtracting the amount of drag applied to the rubber tire coupled through a flywheel to the capstan shaft.  A minimum warm up time of 5 minutes was needed before any adjustment to the drive was attempted.
>
>A supplied strobe disc was used to determine the correct amount of drag.
>It must have been difficult to maintain speed consistancy between machines , using this method.
>
>No wonder later machines used the vastly superior direct capstan drive motor.
>
>Bob Hodge
>
> 
>
>
>
>Robert Hodge,
>Senior Engineer
>Belfer Audio Archive
>Syracuse University
>222 Waverly Ave .
>Syracuse N.Y. 13244-2010
>
>315-443- 7971
>FAX-315-443-4866
>
>  
>
<snip>