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I can tell a syntho-piano a mile away. So can anyone else who's ever listened to a good piano played 
right.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Marcos Sueiro" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 12:24 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Quarter-inch splicing tabs


> After reading this in the Feb 27 Business Week, I'll believe anything when it comes to people's 
> hearing.
>
> "The familiar acoustic piano, with hammers that hit strings, seems almost quaint. As a piece of 
> furniture, it's still impressive. But unless you spend big, it won't sound half as good as even a 
> low-end portable keyboard that stores digital samples of actual notes played on a grand piano."
>
> Marcos (in his 30s)
>
>
> --On Monday, March 13, 2006 11:06 AM -0600 Scott Phillips <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> I'm having much the same experience when interacting with the
>> '30-something' engineering types. I'm 53. It does make me wonder if the
>> older folks here on the list are having the same experiences.....
>>
>> Perhaps some of us should take up teaching.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Karl Miller
>> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 9:37 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Quarter-inch splicing tabs
>>
>> On Sat, 11 Mar 2006, Marie Azile O'Connell wrote:
>>
>>> There was something comforting about editing the 'old' way.  I used to
>>
>>> love moving both reels back and forth to get the exact position, mark
>>> it, cut and splice, and have it as perfect as can be.  But, I love a
>>> challenge!  The learning curve was digital, and it did take longer,
>>> and at times I would despair!  But, 'seeing' the waveform was so cool,
>>
>>> and after a while that came easy to do.  I almost feel like I am
>> cheating.  Progress......
>>
>> As for nostalgia..."when I was a kid" my first semester of electronic
>> music, c.1970, was devoted exclusively to the techniques of musique
>> concrete. I still recall splicing blocks where the edit would be spread
>> out over a foot...which was the only way to get a long attack on the
>> initial envelope. Talk about needing sharp razor blades...and of course
>> we used acetate tape...
>>
>> I have often wondered about all of those tapes that still probably
>> reside in the electronic music labs...I am reminded of all of the
>> different formats we used over the years...8 channel pieces on 1/2 inch
>> tape, dbx encoded, etc. I wonder if anyone has been doing work with
>> these artifacts.
>>
>> And speaking of nostalgia...at a wedding on Friday night I was seated
>> next to some "kid" (probably in his early 30s) who had an interest in
>> the history of electronic music. He quizzed me like I was some relic
>> from the ancient past.
>>
>> I keep my 8 inch floppies (Fairlight), old reels (Music V) etc as a
>> reminder of how quickly things change...well for me, it seems "like it
>> was only yesterday..."
>>
>> Indeed, I do feel like I am cheating today. It also makes me appreciate
>> all that much more the craft of those engineers of the past. At times I
>> think that as the technology improved, the number of edits increased...
>>
>> Karl (feeling old at just 58)
>>
>
>
>
> Marcos