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And to expand on what Bill said, if you don't have staff to play LPs for 
people, it's important to ask patrons if they are comfortable playing 
LPs and not assume they know how to use a turntable. We provide 
assistance to patrons who need a refresher (or have never seen an LP!) 
and we have printed cards with "LP 101" tips on proper handling and 
playback that we borrowed from our music library. A five minute intro on 
how to play an LP is a lot faster than making a CD copy and gets you 
pretty much the same results as far as preserving the collection goes.

David Seubert

Bill Schurk wrote:

>Yo:
>  I'm responding by echoing what David S. has written.  We at the Sound Recordings Archives at Bowling Green State University have NEVER circulated nor have we ever allowed the handling of any recordings for the public listening booths by anyone except our own trained staff.  We now have eight turntables.  When we opened in 1967 we had two plus a transcription table that we still have and use today!  We could never find staff time to make digital copies nor can we find space to even house them if we had them.  We are nearing 110,000 separate cataloging records in OCLC, downloading to our own BGlink.  Way over 100,000 pieces are vinyl with the rest are CD's, DVD's, and VHS tapes.  And, yes, I remember those first cataloged slabs o' vinyl I entered into the collection in late 1967 and early 1968.  They are still being played and are still in verrrrrry good condition.  We get so many gifts of LP's from that era that we also upgrade wherever possible.  We still have most of our
> original Beatles, Stones, Doors, Hendrix, Moody Blues, Pearls Before Swine, and Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders pieces.  We have to watch out that we never replace those original pressings though for newer repros that are of less intrinsic value and many time have special packaging or label of container info that newer issues don't have.
>  And then what about the still to be cataloged 200,000+ LP's we (i.e. I) have to catalog??  And the 300,000+ 45's?
>  Bill Schurk
>  Sound Recordings Archivist
>  Music Library and Sound Recordings Archives
>  William T. Jerome Library
>  Bowling Green State University
>  Bowling Green, OH  43403-0179
>  [log in to unmask]
>  Bowling Green, O
>