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John Ross wrote:

> At  7/18/2006 08:15 PM, Cary  Ginell wrote:
> >if it wasn't for the Folkways recordings, he [Pete Seeger] would not
> >have had any income.
>
> Probably true, but the Folkways stipend (for want of a better word)
> was only part of his income. During those years, he spent a lot of
> time touring and performing "under the radar" of the mainstream music
> business , at schools, colleges and kid's camps. Arguably, he laid
> much of the groundwork for the folk music boom of the sixties by
> exposing a generation of kids to the idea that there's more to folk
> music than your third grade teacher with a pitchpipe.
>
> Of course, the Folkways LPs and the concerts fed off of each other --
> his audiences bought his records, and the records got him more
> concerts, so the "no income" part might be true.
>
> And if he hadn't been doing all those records for Folkways, there's
> no doubt in my mind that Kenny Goldstein would have recorded him for
> Riverside and Prestige, or Diane Hamilton and the Clancys would have
> recorded him for Tradition. They probably wouldn't have produced the
> ongoing revenue stream that he got from Moe Asch -- Utah Phillips
> talks about having done his first record for Prestige, "and damn
> little else" -- but there were other labels out there where he could
> have made records, even at the depth of the blacklists.
>
> And of course, the irony of Pete's having made records for John
> Hammond on Columbia was that they were released around the same time
> that CBS was censoring him when he sang "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy"
> on the Smothers Brothers TV show.
>
> John Ross

And weren't there royalties from the Weavers songs the group collectively
composed as Paul Campbell? Decca didn't withdraw the recordings..far from it,
they kept on repackaging them.

dl