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Tom Fine wrote:
> I must be lucky because I just haven't had more than less than a handful 
> of discs fail over time, so far. And we're talking generic green-dye 
> cheapos written on with a Sharpie. I just last week had to recover some 
> WAV files from one of those. I had a very careful listen to them in the 
> workstation because I was curious, especially about the effect of the 
> Sharpie ink 5 years later. They were fine, except I didn't have as good 
> a DAW or analog playback gear back then! Hopefully, I can report back in 
> 15 more years. I store my data CDR's and DVDR's in paper envelopes in 
> shoebox-type cardboard boxes, so they don't get direct sunlight or dust.
> 
> -- Tom Fine

The Sharpie solvent is not the worst around, but even Sanford recommends 
their pens with water-based ink for writing on CD and DVD. A second 
factor is the nature of the disc's overcoating; some cheapies use a thin 
acrylic lacquer which is quite permeable. Media which are printed or 
otherwise have a heavier overcoating *may* be more resistant, even 
impervious. On the other hand, it is wise to use water-based inks as in 
pens made for the purpose or those available at an art-supply store. My 
favorite is Faber-Castell PITT Artist Pen with the Brush tip.

On media made for ink-jet printing, I too have been using Sharpies for 
many years without problems.

Mike
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